Michael Datto

Overview:

Dr. Datto is an AP/CP/MGP board certified pathologist who specializes in molecular pathology. He is the Associate Vice President for Duke University Health System Clinical Laboratories, the Vice Chair for Clinical Pathology and Medical Director for Duke University Health System Clinical Laboratories.  

In these roles, he is responsible for maintaining the standards of the College of American Pathologists and CLIA/CMS within all Clinical Laboratories at Duke.  Specifically, Dr. Datto oversees clinical testing and reporting, develops quality management systems and proficiency testing programs, provides consultation with ordering physicians, ensures educational programs, develops strategic plans that are in line with the needs of our patient population, physicians and health system leadership, coordinates research and development, ensures adequate and appropriately trained personnel, and provides profession interpretation for molecular diagnostic testing including the wide range of PCR, quantitative PCR, sequencing and FISH based tests for inherited genetic diseases, hematologic malignancies, solid tumors and infectious diseases.

Dr. Datto also serves as the chair of the Accreditation Committee (AC) for the College of American Pathologists (CAP).  The CAP is the largest accreditor of hospital based laboratories in the US and serves as a ‘deemed entity’ by the Center for Medicare Services. In his role of chair of the AC, Dr. Datto oversees the committee that makes clinical accreditation decisions for approximately 7,000 clinical domestic and international laboratories.

Finally, Dr. Datto has an active academic program developing data system to aggregate, normalize and utilize high complexity and high volume laboratory data.  Dr. Datto and his team have developed the Molecular Registry of Tumors (Mr.T); a software solution that supports clinical trials matching, engagement with the AACR GENIE Project and the Molecular Tumor Board for Duke University Health System.  The ultimate goal of this work is to ensure that the vast amount of laboratory data generated on our Duke patients can be put to use, driving better patient care, research and education.

Positions:

Associate Professor of Pathology

Pathology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.A. 1991

Johns Hopkins University

Ph.D. 1998

Duke University

M.D. 1999

Duke University

Post-Doctoral Fellow, Pharmacology

Duke University

Resident, Pathology

Duke University

Grants:

Non Muscle Myosin II Contractility Putatively Regulates Scar Contracture

Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Collaborator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Donor-Derived Neuroendocrine Carcinoma Transmission to Two Kidney Transplant Recipients Demonstrated by Short Tandem Repeat Analysis: A Case Report.

Cancer transmission from a donor organ to a transplant recipient is a rare but not infrequently fatal event. We report a case of lung cancer transmission from a deceased donor to 2 kidney recipients. Approximately 1 year after uneventful kidney transplantation, both recipients developed acute kidney failure. Computed tomography imaging of abdomen and pelvis for both recipients showed masses in the transplanted kidneys along with innumerable masses in the livers. Pathologic examinations for both cases demonstrated high-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma with "mirror image" histologic findings in the transplant kidneys with liver metastases. Short tandem repeat (STR) analyses were performed to determine the origin of the tumors. STRs of both tumors were nearly identical to that of the donor, proving that both tumors were from the same donor. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that both tumors were positive for thyroid transcription factor 1, supporting a lung primary. One recipient died as a direct sequela to metastatic tumor, and the other required transplant nephrectomy and chemotherapy. Awareness of this largely nonpreventable complication and prompt molecular testing if cancer transmission is suspected are important.
Authors
Takeda, K; Mittenzwei, R; Geisinger, KR; Datto, MB; Rebellato, LM
MLA Citation
Takeda, Kotaro, et al. “Donor-Derived Neuroendocrine Carcinoma Transmission to Two Kidney Transplant Recipients Demonstrated by Short Tandem Repeat Analysis: A Case Report.Transplant Proc, Apr. 2021. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.transproceed.2021.03.002.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1478150
PMID
33824012
Source
pubmed
Published In
Transplant Proc
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.transproceed.2021.03.002

Early experience with universal preprocedural testing for SARS-CoV-2 in a relatively low-prevalence area.

We implemented universal severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) testing of patients undergoing surgical procedures as a means to conserve personal protective equipment (PPE). The rate of asymptomatic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was <0.5%, which suggests that early local public health interventions were successful. Although our protocol was resource intensive, it prevented exposures to healthcare team members.
Authors
Lewis, SS; Smith, BA; Akinboyo, IC; Seidelman, J; Wolfe, C; Kirk, AB; Martin, G; Denny, T; Lobaugh, B; Rehder, C; Cardona, D; Lee, MJ; Polage, CR; Datto, MB
MLA Citation
Lewis, Sarah S., et al. “Early experience with universal preprocedural testing for SARS-CoV-2 in a relatively low-prevalence area.Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol, vol. 42, no. 3, Mar. 2021, pp. 341–43. Pubmed, doi:10.1017/ice.2020.398.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1453778
PMID
32741409
Source
pubmed
Published In
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol
Volume
42
Published Date
Start Page
341
End Page
343
DOI
10.1017/ice.2020.398

Results and Clinical Utilization of Foundation Medicine Molecular Tumor Profiling in Uterine and Ovarian Cancers.

BACKGROUND: Recent advances in next-generation sequencing have allowed for an increase in molecular tumor profiling. OBJECTIVE: We sought to assess the actionability and clinical utilization of molecular tumor profiling results obtained via Foundation Medicine tumor sequencing tests in uterine and ovarian cancers. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed a single-institution retrospective chart review to obtain demographic and clinical information in patients with uterine and ovarian cancer whose tumors were submitted to Foundation Medicine for molecular tumor profiling over a 7-year period. Alterations identified on testing were stratified according to the OncoKB database actionability algorithm. Descriptive statistics were primarily used to analyze the data. RESULTS: Tumors from 185 women with gynecologic cancer were submitted for molecular tumor profiling between 2013 and 2019. The majority of tests (144/185; 78%) were ordered after a diagnosis of recurrence. In 60 (32%), no actionable molecular alteration was identified. Thirteen (7%) identified an alteration that directed to a US Food and Drug Administration-approved therapy in that tumor type, while 112 (61%) had alterations with investigational or hypothetical treatment implications. In patients with any actionable finding, treatment was initiated in 27 (15%) based on these results. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of uterine and ovarian cancers (93%) did not have molecular alterations with corresponding Food and Drug Administration-approved treatments. Even in patients with a potentially actionable alteration, gynecologic oncologists were more likely to choose an alternative therapy. Further investigation is warranted to determine which patients with uterine and ovarian cancer are most likely to benefit from molecular tumor profiling and the ideal timing of testing. The potential to identify effective therapeutic options in a minority of patients needs to be balanced with the current limited clinical applicability of these results in most cases.
Authors
Watson, CH; Broadwater, G; Wong, J; Spinosa, D; de Oca, MKM; Datto, M; Green, M; Hubbard, C; McKinney, M; McCall, SJ; Havrilesky, LJ; Strickler, JH; Berchuck, A; Strickland, KC; Previs, RA
MLA Citation
Watson, Catherine H., et al. “Results and Clinical Utilization of Foundation Medicine Molecular Tumor Profiling in Uterine and Ovarian Cancers.Target Oncol, vol. 16, no. 1, Jan. 2021, pp. 109–18. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s11523-020-00785-z.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1470791
PMID
33400095
Source
pubmed
Published In
Target Oncol
Volume
16
Published Date
Start Page
109
End Page
118
DOI
10.1007/s11523-020-00785-z

Assessment of an Online Tool to Simulate the Effect of Pooled Testing for SARS-CoV-2 Detection in Asymptomatic and Symptomatic Populations.

Authors
Polage, CR; Lee, MJ; Hubbard, C; Rehder, C; Cardona, D; Denny, T; Datto, MB
MLA Citation
Polage, Christopher R., et al. “Assessment of an Online Tool to Simulate the Effect of Pooled Testing for SARS-CoV-2 Detection in Asymptomatic and Symptomatic Populations.Jama Netw Open, vol. 3, no. 12, Dec. 2020, p. e2031517. Pubmed, doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.31517.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1468639
PMID
33301014
Source
pubmed
Published In
Jama Network Open
Volume
3
Published Date
Start Page
e2031517
DOI
10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.31517

Implementation of a Pooled Surveillance Testing Program for Asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 Infections on a College Campus - Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, August 2-October 11, 2020.

On university campuses and in similar congregate environments, surveillance testing of asymptomatic persons is a critical strategy (1,2) for preventing transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). All students at Duke University, a private research university in Durham, North Carolina, signed the Duke Compact (3), agreeing to observe mandatory masking, social distancing, and participation in entry and surveillance testing. The university implemented a five-to-one pooled testing program for SARS-CoV-2 using a quantitative, in-house, laboratory-developed, real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test (4,5). Pooling of specimens to enable large-scale testing while minimizing use of reagents was pioneered during the human immunodeficiency virus pandemic (6). A similar methodology was adapted for Duke University's asymptomatic testing program. The baseline SARS-CoV-2 testing plan was to distribute tests geospatially and temporally across on- and off-campus student populations. By September 20, 2020, asymptomatic testing was scaled up to testing targets, which include testing for residential undergraduates twice weekly, off-campus undergraduates one to two times per week, and graduate students approximately once weekly. In addition, in response to newly identified positive test results, testing was focused in locations or within cohorts where data suggested an increased risk for transmission. Scale-up over 4 weeks entailed redeploying staff members to prepare 15 campus testing sites for specimen collection, developing information management tools, and repurposing laboratory automation to establish an asymptomatic surveillance system. During August 2-October 11, 68,913 specimens from 10,265 graduate and undergraduate students were tested. Eighty-four specimens were positive for SARS-CoV-2, and 51% were among persons with no symptoms. Testing as a result of contact tracing identified 27.4% of infections. A combination of risk-reduction strategies and frequent surveillance testing likely contributed to a prolonged period of low transmission on campus. These findings highlight the importance of combined testing and contact tracing strategies beyond symptomatic testing, in association with other preventive measures. Pooled testing balances resource availability with supply-chain disruptions, high throughput with high sensitivity, and rapid turnaround with an acceptable workload.
Authors
Denny, TN; Andrews, L; Bonsignori, M; Cavanaugh, K; Datto, MB; Deckard, A; DeMarco, CT; DeNaeyer, N; Epling, CA; Gurley, T; Haase, SB; Hallberg, C; Harer, J; Kneifel, CL; Lee, MJ; Louzao, R; Moody, MA; Moore, Z; Polage, CR; Puglin, J; Spotts, PH; Vaughn, JA; Wolfe, CR
MLA Citation
Denny, Thomas N., et al. “Implementation of a Pooled Surveillance Testing Program for Asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 Infections on a College Campus - Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, August 2-October 11, 2020.Mmwr Morb Mortal Wkly Rep, vol. 69, no. 46, Nov. 2020, pp. 1743–47. Pubmed, doi:10.15585/mmwr.mm6946e1.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1464818
PMID
33211678
Source
pubmed
Published In
Mmwr. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
Volume
69
Published Date
Start Page
1743
End Page
1747
DOI
10.15585/mmwr.mm6946e1