Brittany Davidson

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gynecologic Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2009

University of Virginia

University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Medical School

Duke University

Obstetrics and Gynecology Certification

American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Gynecologic Oncology Subspeciality Certification

American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Grants:

CL-PTL-119: Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled Phase III Trial of Maintenance FANG (bi-shRNAfurin and GMCSF Augmented Autologous Tumor Cell Immunotherapy) for High Risk Stage III/IV Ovarian Cancer

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Gradalis, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Khorana score stratification and incidence of venous thromboembolism among women with ovarian cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy

Authors
Salinaro, J; Zhang, Y; Buckingham, L; Clark, L; Havrilesky, L; Davidson, B
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1496696
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Gynecologic Oncology
Volume
162
Published Date
Start Page
S194
End Page
S194

The ABCs of ACPs: perspectives from gynecologic oncology clinicians on an advance care planning initiative

Authors
MLA Citation
Ma, Jessica, et al. “The ABCs of ACPs: perspectives from gynecologic oncology clinicians on an advance care planning initiative.” Gynecologic Oncology, vol. 162, 2021, pp. S287–88.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1496697
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Gynecologic Oncology
Volume
162
Published Date
Start Page
S287
End Page
S288

Telemedicine and gynecologic oncology: caring for patients remotely during a global pandemic

Authors
Gonzalez, R; Wong, J; Hayes, T; Havrilesky, L; Albright, B; Watson, C; Davidson, B; Previs, R
MLA Citation
Gonzalez, Rafael, et al. “Telemedicine and gynecologic oncology: caring for patients remotely during a global pandemic.” Gynecologic Oncology, vol. 162, 2021, pp. S71–72.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1496698
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Gynecologic Oncology
Volume
162
Published Date
Start Page
S71
End Page
S72

Adherence to PARP inhibitor therapy among women with ovarian cancer.

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate medical adherence for patients with ovarian cancer who initiated treatment with a PARP inhibitor therapy, and to identify factors associated with nonadherence. METHODS: We used the MarketScan Database to identify ovarian cancer patients who initiated PARP inhibitor therapy between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2017. The primary outcome was adherence defined as ≥ 80% proportion of days covered (PDC). A secondary outcome included adherence assessed using the medication possession ratio (MPR). Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to assess relation between PDC and explanatory variables. Sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate impact of dose-adjustments and toxicity-related delays on adherence. RESULTS: Among 170,976 patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer, 151 patients met inclusion criteria. The median time from diagnosis to initiating therapy was 33 months. Overall, 40 (26.5%) were non-adherent based on a PDC less than 80%. Non-adherent patients were more likely to receive niraparib and have a longer duration of therapy (p < 0.05). We found no significant impact of age, comorbidities, insurance plan, or year of PARP inhibitor initiation on non-adherence. In a sensitivity analysis to assess different definition of adherence, non-adherence ranged from 11.3% to 41.1%. When accounting for possible dose-adjustments, 21.2% of patients were non-adherent. CONCLUSION: This population based study of ovarian cancer patients found that a quarter of patients may be sub-optimally adherent to PARP inhibitor therapy. Future research should focus on identification of patients at risk for nonadherence and interventions to lower nonadherence among these patients.
Authors
Moss, HA; Chen, L; Hershman, DL; Davidson, B; Wright, JD
MLA Citation
Moss, Haley A., et al. “Adherence to PARP inhibitor therapy among women with ovarian cancer.Gynecol Oncol, vol. 163, no. 2, Nov. 2021, pp. 262–68. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.ygyno.2021.08.025.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1497276
PMID
34509297
Source
pubmed
Published In
Gynecol Oncol
Volume
163
Published Date
Start Page
262
End Page
268
DOI
10.1016/j.ygyno.2021.08.025

Primary cytoreductive surgery for advanced stage endometrial cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

OBJECTIVE: Endometrial cancer uncommonly presents at an advanced stage and little prospective evidence exists to guide the management thereof. We aimed to summarize the evidence about primary cytoreductive surgery in the treatment of advanced stage endometrial cancer. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, Embase, and Scopus databases were searched from inception to September 11, 2020, using search terms representing the themes "endometrial cancer," "advanced stage," and "primary cytoreductive surgery." STUDY ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA: We included full-text, English reports that included ≥10 patients undergoing primary cytoreductive surgery for advanced stage endometrial cancer and that reported on the outcomes of primary cytoreductive surgery and survival rates based on the residual disease burden. METHODS: Two reviewers independently screened the studies and with disagreements between the reviewers resolved by a third reviewer. Data were extracted using a standardized form. The percentage of cases reaching maximal (no gross residual disease) and optimal (<1 cm or <2 cm residual disease) cytoreduction were assessed by summing binomials proportions, and the association with survival was assessed using an inverse variance-weighted meta-analysis of logarithmic hazard ratios. RESULTS: From 1219 unique records identified, 34 studies were selected for inclusion. Studies consisted of single or multi-institutional cohorts of patients collected over a period of 6 to 24 years and included various mixes of histologies (endometrioid, serous, clear cell, and carcinosarcoma) and disease stages (III or IV). In a meta-analysis of the extent of residual disease after primary cytoreductive surgery, we found that 52.1% of cases reached no gross residual disease status (n=18 studies; 1329 patients) and 75% reached <1 cm residual disease status (n=27 studies; 2343 patients). The proportion of cytoreduction for both thresholds was lower for studies of stage IV vs stage III to IV disease (41.4% vs 69.8% for no gross residual disease; 63.2% vs 82.2% for <1 cm residual disease) but did not vary notably by histology. In a meta-analysis of the reported hazard ratios, submaximal (any gross residual disease vs no gross residual disease) and suboptimal (≥1 cm vs <1 cm) cytoreduction thresholds were associated with worse progression-free survival (submaximal hazard ratio, 2.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.45-3.21; I2=68%; suboptimal hazard ratio, 2.55; 95% confidence interval, 1.93-3.37; I2=63%) and overall survival rates (submaximal hazard ratio, 2.57; 95% confidence interval, 2.13-3.10; I2=1%; suboptimal hazard ratio, 2.62; 95% confidence interval, 2.20-3.11; I2=15%). Sensitivity analyses limited to high-quality studies demonstrated consistent results. CONCLUSION: Among cases of advanced stage endometrial cancer undergoing primary cytoreductive surgery, a significant proportion of patients are left with residual disease, which is associated with worse survival outcomes. Further investigations about the roles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and primary cytoreductive surgery in prospective trials is warranted in this population.
Authors
Albright, BB; Monuszko, KA; Kaplan, SJ; Davidson, BA; Moss, HA; Huang, AB; Melamed, A; Wright, JD; Havrilesky, LJ; Previs, RA
MLA Citation
Albright, Benjamin B., et al. “Primary cytoreductive surgery for advanced stage endometrial cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.Am J Obstet Gynecol, vol. 225, no. 3, Sept. 2021, pp. 237.e1-237.e24. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.ajog.2021.04.254.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1482001
PMID
33957111
Source
pubmed
Published In
American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume
225
Published Date
Start Page
237.e1
End Page
237.e24
DOI
10.1016/j.ajog.2021.04.254

Research Areas:

Cancer in women
Palliative Care