Brittany Davidson

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gynecologic Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2009

University of Virginia

University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Medical School

Duke University

Obstetrics and Gynecology Certification

American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Gynecologic Oncology Subspeciality Certification

American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Grants:

CL-PTL-119: Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled Phase III Trial of Maintenance FANG (bi-shRNAfurin and GMCSF Augmented Autologous Tumor Cell Immunotherapy) for High Risk Stage III/IV Ovarian Cancer

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Gradalis, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Cost-Effectiveness of Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis During Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Ovarian Cancer.

PURPOSE: Two recent clinical trials have demonstrated that direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are effective as venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis in patients with moderate-to-high risk ambulatory cancer initiating chemotherapy. Patients with advanced ovarian cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy are at particularly increased risk of VTE. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis from a health system perspective to determine if DOACs are a feasible prophylactic strategy in this population. METHODS: A simple decision tree was created from a health system perspective, comparing two strategies: prophylactic DOAC taken for 18 weeks during chemotherapy versus no VTE prophylaxis. Rates of VTE (7.3% DOAC v 13.6% no treatment), major bleeding (2.6% v 1.3%), and clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding (4.6% v 3.3%) were modeled. Cost estimates were obtained from wholesale drug costs, published studies, and Medicare reimbursement data. Probabilistic, one-way, and two-way sensitivity analyses were performed. RESULTS: In the base case model, DOAC prophylaxis is more costly and more effective than no therapy (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio = $256,218 in US dollars/quality-adjusted life year). In one-way sensitivity analyses, reducing the DOAC cost by 32% or raising the baseline VTE rate above 18% renders this strategy potentially cost-effective with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio below $150,000 in US dollars/quality-adjusted life year. CONCLUSION: Further confirmation of the true baseline VTE rate among women initiating neoadjuvant chemotherapy for ovarian cancer will determine whether prophylactic dose DOAC is a value-based strategy. Less costly VTE prophylaxis options such as generic DOACs (once available) and aspirin also warrant investigation.
Authors
Ryan, ES; Havrilesky, LJ; Salinaro, JR; Davidson, BA
MLA Citation
Ryan, Emma S., et al. “Cost-Effectiveness of Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis During Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Ovarian Cancer.Jco Oncol Pract, Apr. 2021, p. OP2000783. Pubmed, doi:10.1200/OP.20.00783.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1481200
PMID
33914645
Source
pubmed
Published In
Jco Oncol Pract
Published Date
Start Page
OP2000783
DOI
10.1200/OP.20.00783

Pembrolizumab window study: Illuminating the immunologic landscape in gynecologic cancers

Authors
MLA Citation
Gaillard, S., et al. “Pembrolizumab window study: Illuminating the immunologic landscape in gynecologic cancers.” Gynecologic Oncology, vol. 159, Elsevier BV, 2020, pp. 41–41. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.ygyno.2020.06.087.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1467265
Source
crossref
Published In
Gynecologic Oncology
Volume
159
Published Date
Start Page
41
End Page
41
DOI
10.1016/j.ygyno.2020.06.087

The gynecologic oncology patient experience with oral anti-cancer therapy: A quantitative and qualitative analysis of medication adherence

MLA Citation
Watson, C. H., et al. “The gynecologic oncology patient experience with oral anti-cancer therapy: A quantitative and qualitative analysis of medication adherence.” Gynecologic Oncology, vol. 159, Elsevier BV, 2020, pp. 285–285. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.ygyno.2020.05.499.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1467406
Source
crossref
Published In
Gynecologic Oncology
Volume
159
Published Date
Start Page
285
End Page
285
DOI
10.1016/j.ygyno.2020.05.499

Development of a prediction model for postoperative opioid use following gynecologic surgery

Authors
Rodriguez, IV; Salinaro, JR; Kohrman, O; Habib, AS; Havrilesky, LJ; Jelovsek, JE; Davidson, BA
MLA Citation
Rodriguez, I. V., et al. “Development of a prediction model for postoperative opioid use following gynecologic surgery.” Gynecologic Oncology, vol. 159, Elsevier BV, 2020, pp. 274–75. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.ygyno.2020.05.479.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1467551
Source
crossref
Published In
Gynecologic Oncology
Volume
159
Published Date
Start Page
274
End Page
275
DOI
10.1016/j.ygyno.2020.05.479

Gynecologic malignancy-associated bowel obstruction: Outcomes and prognostic implications

Authors
Howell, EP; Watson, CH; Puechl, AM; Davidson, BA
MLA Citation
Howell, E. P., et al. “Gynecologic malignancy-associated bowel obstruction: Outcomes and prognostic implications.” Gynecologic Oncology, vol. 159, Elsevier BV, 2020, pp. 316–316. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.ygyno.2020.05.572.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1467552
Source
crossref
Published In
Gynecologic Oncology
Volume
159
Published Date
Start Page
316
End Page
316
DOI
10.1016/j.ygyno.2020.05.572

Research Areas:

Cancer in women
Palliative Care