James Davis

Overview:

Dr. James Davis is a practicing physician of Internal Medicine, and serves as the Medical Director for Duke Center for Smoking Cessation, Director of the Duke Smoking Cessation Program and Co-Director of the Duke-UNC Tobacco Treatment Specialist Credentialing Program.  His research focuses on development of new pharmaceutical treatments for smoking cessation.  He is principal investigator on several trials including a study on “adaptive” smoking cessation and several trials on new medications for smoking cessation. The new medications leverage more novel neurobiological mechanisms - NMDA receptor antagonism, nicotinic receptor antagonism, which impact addiction-based learning and cue response. Additionally, Dr. Davis serves as co-investigator on trials on lung cancer screening, e-cigarettes, minor nicotine alkaloids, imaging trials, lung function trials and others. Dr. Davis leads the Duke Smoke-Free Policy Initiative, is co-author on a national  tobacco dependence treatment guideline, and provides training in tobacco dependence treatment for the Duke School of Medicine, Duke Internal Medicine, Family Practice and Psychiatry residency programs. 

Positions:

Associate Professor of Medicine

Medicine, General Internal Medicine
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1997

Southern Illinois University, School of Medicine

Internal Medicine Residency

Mayo Clinic

Grants:

Pfizer Preceptorship

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Pfizer, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Randomized, Double-Blind Study to Evaluate the Impact of AXS-05 on Smoking Behavior.

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Axsome Therapeutics Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Lung Cancer Screening Implementation: Evaluation of Patient-Centered Care

Administered By
Medicine, General Internal Medicine
Awarded By
Portland VA Research Foundation
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Davis Tobacco-Free Generation Campus initiative Grant

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
American Cancer Society, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Innovations to Increase Utilization of a Smoking Cessation Program ¿ A Retrospective Review

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Pfizer, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Experiences With Smoking Cessation Attempts and Prior Use of Cessation Aids in Smokers With HIV: Findings From a Focus Group Study Conducted in Durham, North Carolina.

Cigarette smoking remains disproportionately prevalent and is increasingly a cause of death and disability among people with HIV (PWH). Many PWH are interested in quitting, but interest in and uptake of first-line smoking cessation pharmacotherapies are varied in this population. To provide current data regarding experiences with and perceptions of smoking cessation and cessation aids among PWH living in Durham, North Carolina, the authors conducted five focus group interviews (total n = 24; 96% African American) using semistructured interviews. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, coded, and thematically analyzed. Major themes included ambivalence and/or lack of interest in cessation; presence of cessation barriers; perceived perceptions of ineffectiveness of cessation aids; perceived medication side effects; and conflation of the harms resulting from use of tobacco products and nicotine replacement therapy. Innovative and effective interventions must account for the aforementioned multiple barriers to cessation as well as prior experiences with and misperceptions regarding cessation aids.
Authors
Pacek, LR; Holloway, AD; Cropsey, KL; Meade, CS; Sweitzer, MM; Davis, JM; Joseph McClernon, F
MLA Citation
Pacek, Lauren R., et al. “Experiences With Smoking Cessation Attempts and Prior Use of Cessation Aids in Smokers With HIV: Findings From a Focus Group Study Conducted in Durham, North Carolina.Aids Educ Prev, vol. 33, no. 2, Apr. 2021, pp. 158–68. Pubmed, doi:10.1521/aeap.2021.33.2.158.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1478467
PMID
33821680
Source
pubmed
Published In
Aids Educ Prev
Volume
33
Published Date
Start Page
158
End Page
168
DOI
10.1521/aeap.2021.33.2.158

Association of Lung Cancer Screening Communication and Smoking Cessation Readiness

Authors
DeSalvo, J; Schweiger, L; Melzer, AC; Davis, J; Slatore, CG
MLA Citation
DeSalvo, J., et al. “Association of Lung Cancer Screening Communication and Smoking Cessation Readiness.” American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vol. 201, 2020.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1467708
Source
wos-lite
Published In
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Volume
201
Published Date

Cue-based treatment for light smokers: A proof of concept pilot.

INTRODUCTION: Light smoking (smoking ≤ 10 cigarettes per day or on some days) has become increasingly prevalent in the US and increases morbidity and mortality. Many light smokers do not experience significant nicotine withdrawal but instead smoke in response to cues. Minimal evidence exists supporting interventions to help light smokers quit smoking. METHODS: We present results from a proof-of-concept pilot study designed to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of a cue-based smoking cessation intervention targeted to light daily and intermittent smokers. Participants were randomized to one of two arms: Arm 1) standard smoking cessation treatment or Arm 2) standard smoking cessation treatment + enhanced cue-based treatment that included interactive texting to extend cue exposure treatment to real-world settings and cue management counseling.Outcomes included feasibility (number of participants who were recruited and who completed the intervention), acceptability (intervention ratings), and preliminary efficacy (7-day point prevalence abstinence). RESULTS: We randomized 24 English and Spanish-speaking light smokers, 13 to the treatment arm and 11 to the control arm. Across both arms, 77% attended all counseling sessions, 90% rated these sessions as very useful and 100% said that they would recommend the intervention to a friend. 15% in the treatment arm had biochemically-validated smoking abstinence compared to 0% in the standard counseling arm. CONCLUSIONS: Results from this proof-of-concept study demonstrated that a cue-based intervention is feasible and acceptable among light smokers and suggests the need for a fully powered study to assess this approach. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT03416621.
Authors
Pollak, KI; Oliver, JA; Pieper, C; Davis, JM; Gao, X; Noonan, D; Kennedy, D; Granados, I; Fish, LJ
MLA Citation
Pollak, Kathryn I., et al. “Cue-based treatment for light smokers: A proof of concept pilot.Addict Behav, vol. 114, Mar. 2021, p. 106717. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2020.106717.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1463041
PMID
33109394
Source
pubmed
Published In
Addict Behav
Volume
114
Published Date
Start Page
106717
DOI
10.1016/j.addbeh.2020.106717

Strategies for Referring Cancer Patients in a Smoking Cessation Program.

Most people who smoke and develop cancer are unable to quit smoking. To address this, many cancer centers have now opened smoking cessation programs specifically designed to help cancer patients to quit. An important question has now emerged-what is the most effective approach for engaging smokers within a cancer center in these smoking cessation programs? We report outcomes from a retrospective observational study comparing three referral methods-traditional referral, best practice advisory (BPA), and direct outreach-on utilization of the Duke Cancer Center Smoking Cessation Program. We found that program utilization rate was higher for direct outreach (5.4%) than traditional referral (0.8%), p < 0.001, and BPA (0.2%); p < 0.001. Program utilization was 6.4% for all methods combined. Inferring a causal relationship between referral method and program utilization was not possible because the study did not use a randomized design. Innovation is needed to generate higher utilization rates for cancer center smoking cessation programs.
Authors
Davis, JM; Thomas, LC; Dirkes, JEH; Swartzwelder, HS
MLA Citation
Davis, James M., et al. “Strategies for Referring Cancer Patients in a Smoking Cessation Program.Int J Environ Res Public Health, vol. 17, no. 17, Aug. 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.3390/ijerph17176089.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1456707
PMID
32825665
Source
pubmed
Published In
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume
17
Published Date
DOI
10.3390/ijerph17176089

Comparison of referral methods into a smoking cessation program.

Rational, aims & objectives: The goal of this observational study was to compare three referral methods and determine which led to the highest utilization of the Duke Smoking Cessation Program (DSCP). Materials & methods: We conducted two assessments within the Duke health system: a 12-month assessment of Traditional Referral (a provider refers a patient during a patient visit) and Best Practice Advisory (BPA) (a provider refers a patient after responding to an alert within the electronic health record); and a 30-day assessment of Population Outreach (a list of smokers is generated through the electronic health record and patients are contacted directly). Results: Over the 12-month assessment, a total of 13,586 smokers were seen throughout health system clinics receiving services from the DSCP. During this period, the service utilization rate was significantly higher for Traditional Referral (3.8%) than for BPA (0.6%); p < 0.005. The 30-day pilot assessment of showed a service utilization rate for Population Outreach of 6.3%, significantly higher than Traditional Referral (3.8%); p < 0.005 and BPA (0.6%; p < 0.005). Conclusion: Population Outreach appears to be an effective referral method for increasing utilization of the DSCP.
Authors
Davis, JM; Thomas, LC; Dirkes, JE; Datta, SK; Dennis, PA
MLA Citation
Davis, James M., et al. “Comparison of referral methods into a smoking cessation program.J Comp Eff Res, vol. 9, no. 11, Aug. 2020, pp. 807–15. Pubmed, doi:10.2217/cer-2020-0004.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1456517
PMID
32795088
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Comp Eff Res
Volume
9
Published Date
Start Page
807
End Page
815
DOI
10.2217/cer-2020-0004

Research Areas:

Education
Mindfulness (Psychology)
Nicotine addiction
Oral medication
Research
Smoking Cessation