James Davis

Overview:

Dr. James Davis is a practicing physician of Internal Medicine, and serves as the Medical Director for Duke Center for Smoking Cessation, Director of the Duke Smoking Cessation Program and Co-Director of the Duke-UNC Tobacco Treatment Specialist Credentialing Program.  His research focuses on development of new pharmaceutical treatments for smoking cessation.  He is principal investigator on several trials including a study on “adaptive” smoking cessation and several trials on new medications for smoking cessation. The new medications leverage more novel neurobiological mechanisms - NMDA receptor antagonism, nicotinic receptor antagonism, which impact addiction-based learning and cue response. Additionally, Dr. Davis serves as co-investigator on trials on lung cancer screening, e-cigarettes, minor nicotine alkaloids, imaging trials, lung function trials and others. Dr. Davis leads the Duke Smoke-Free Policy Initiative, is co-author on a national  tobacco dependence treatment guideline, and provides training in tobacco dependence treatment for the Duke School of Medicine, Duke Internal Medicine, Family Practice and Psychiatry residency programs. 

Positions:

Associate Professor of Medicine

Medicine, General Internal Medicine
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1997

Southern Illinois University, School of Medicine

Internal Medicine Residency

Mayo Clinic

Grants:

Pfizer Preceptorship

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Pfizer, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Randomized, Double-Blind Study to Evaluate the Impact of AXS-05 on Smoking Behavior.

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Axsome Therapeutics Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Lung Cancer Screening Implementation: Evaluation of Patient-Centered Care

Administered By
Medicine, General Internal Medicine
Awarded By
Portland VA Research Foundation
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Davis Tobacco-Free Generation Campus initiative Grant

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
American Cancer Society, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Innovations to Increase Utilization of a Smoking Cessation Program ¿ A Retrospective Review

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Pfizer, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Dextromethorphan and bupropion reduces high level remifentanil self-administration in rats.

Opiate addiction has risen substantially during the past decade. New treatments to combat opiate addiction are sorely needed. The current study was conducted to determine the acute individual and interactive effects of bupropion and dextromethorphan in a rat model of opiate self-administration using the short-acting synthetic opioid remifentanil. Both of these drugs have been found to reduce self-administration of nicotine. Bupropion and dextromethorphan and their combination had differential effects depending on whether the rats showed higher or lower baseline remifentanil self-administration. The rats with higher initial remifentanil self-administration showed a significant decrease in remifentanil self-administration with bupropion or dextromethorphan treatment, compared to the vehicle control condition. This decrease in self-remifentanil administration was most pronounced when combination of the higher doses of bupropion and dextromethorphan were administered. In contrast, the rats with lower baseline remifentanil self-administration showed the opposite effect of drug treatment with an increase in remifentanil self-administration with bupropion treatment compared to the vehicle control condition. Dextromethorphan had no significant effect inthis group. This study shows that combination bupropion and dextromethorphan affects remifentanil self-administration in a complex fashion with differential effects on low and high baseline responders. In subjects with high baseline remifentanil self-administration, bupropion and dextromethorphan treatment significantly reduced self-administration, whereas in subjects with low baseline remifentanil self-administration, bupropion increased remifentanil self-administration and dextromethorphan had no discernible effect. This finding suggests that combination bupropion-dextromethorphan should be tested in humans, with a focus on treating people with high-level opiate use.
Authors
Blair, G; Wells, C; Ko, A; Modarres, J; Pace, C; Davis, JM; Rezvani, AH; Rose, JE; Levin, ED
MLA Citation
Blair, Graham, et al. “Dextromethorphan and bupropion reduces high level remifentanil self-administration in rats.Pharmacol Biochem Behav, vol. 193, June 2020, p. 172919. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.pbb.2020.172919.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1436666
PMID
32246985
Source
pubmed
Published In
Pharmacol Biochem Behav
Volume
193
Published Date
Start Page
172919
DOI
10.1016/j.pbb.2020.172919

"I already know that smoking ain't good for me": Patient and Clinician Perspectives on Lung Cancer Screening Decision-Making Discussions as a Teachable Moment.

BACKGROUND: Lung cancer screening (LCS) is now recommended for people at high risk of dying of lung cancer. RESEARCH QUESTION: The purpose of this study was to use the LCS decision discussion as a case study to understand possible underlying components of a teachable moment to enhance motivation for smoking cessation. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: The study investigated how patients and clinicians communicate about smoking. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were performed of the experiences of 51 individuals who formerly or currently smoked who were offered LCS and 24 clinicians. Only the baseline interviews were used because including the follow-up interviews would have been beyond the scope of this article. The interviews focused on communication about smoking, the perceived importance of discussing smoking and screening together, and patients' perceived challenges to smoking cessation. RESULTS: Patients and clinicians differed in their views on the role of the LCS decision discussion as a teachable moment. Although clinicians felt that this discussion was a good opportunity to positively influence smoking behaviors, neither patients nor clinicians perceived the discussion as a teachable moment affecting smoking behaviors. Other motivating factors for smoking cessation were found. INTERPRETATION: Our findings indicate that LCS decision discussions are not currently a teachable moment for behavior change in smoking cessation, but perhaps clinicians could address other aspects of communication to enhance motivation for cessation. Our hypothesized teachable moment model helps explain that there may not be sufficient emotional response elicited during the discussion to motivate a major behavior change such as smoking cessation.
Authors
Golden, SE; Ono, SS; Melzer, A; Davis, J; Zeliadt, SB; Heffner, JL; Kathuria, H; Garcia-Alexander, G; Slatore, CG
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1438098
PMID
32304776
Source
pubmed
Published In
Chest
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.chest.2020.03.061

USE OF THE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD TO INCREASE PATIENT ENGAGEMENT IN A SMOKING CESSATION PROGRAM (SCP)

Authors
Datta, S; Davis, J; Dennis, P
MLA Citation
Datta, Santanu, et al. “USE OF THE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD TO INCREASE PATIENT ENGAGEMENT IN A SMOKING CESSATION PROGRAM (SCP).” Medical Decision Making, vol. 40, no. 1, SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2020, pp. E246–E246.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1431206
Source
wos
Published In
Medical Decision Making : an International Journal of the Society for Medical Decision Making
Volume
40
Published Date
Start Page
E246
End Page
E246

A Systematic Approach to Perioperative Smoking Cessation

© 2020 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved. Background:There is compelling evidence that smoking leads to poor postoperative outcomes including increased incidence of wound infection, respiratory infection, sepsis, cardiac arrest, and mortality. There is also compelling evidence that smoking cessation before surgery leads to improved outcomes. A recent meta-analysis found that brief smoking interventions may be insufficient to change postoperative outcomes. However, more intensive evidence-based smoking cessation interventions do improve postoperative outcomes and lead to long-term smoking abstinence. From a healthcare perspective, this raises a question of how to best provide effective perioperative smoking cessation treatment to a population.Methods:Duke University Health System recently developed a systematic approach to perioperative smoking cessation. In this report, we outline evidence-based principles for perioperative smoking cessation and describe initial results from a perioperative smoking cessation program.Results:In the first 100 days of the Duke Perioperative Smoking Cessation Program, we received 420 referrals. Participants had a mean pack-year history of 50.3 (packs/day×years smoking; SD 32.5), a mean Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence score of 4.5 (SD 2.5), and a mean expired breath carbon monoxide of 11.8 (SD 7.5) parts per million. Mean days from initial perioperative smoking cessation visit to surgery was 21.4 (SD 22.3).Discussion:This model of perioperative smoking cessation is in the early stages of development; however, evidence-based perioperative smoking cessation services can be effective across a health system.
Authors
Davis, JM; Thomas, LC; Dirkes, JEH; Aronson, S
MLA Citation
Davis, J. M., et al. “A Systematic Approach to Perioperative Smoking Cessation.” Techniques in Orthopaedics, vol. 35, no. 1, Jan. 2020, pp. 25–30. Scopus, doi:10.1097/BTO.0000000000000435.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1437863
Source
scopus
Published In
Techniques in Orthopaedics (Rockville, Md.)
Volume
35
Published Date
Start Page
25
End Page
30
DOI
10.1097/BTO.0000000000000435

Correction to: The Effect of Brief Mindfulness Training on Brain Reactivity to Food Cues During Nicotine Withdrawal: A Pilot Functional Imaging Study (Mindfulness, (2019), 10, 11, (2272-2276), 10.1007/s12671-019-01201-y)

© 2019, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature. The original publication is missing the following funding statement. “The study was funded by NIDA grant number P50DA027840”.
Authors
Kragel, EA; Sweitzer, MM; Davis, JM
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1416910
Source
scopus
Published In
Mindfulness
Volume
10
Published Date
Start Page
2480
DOI
10.1007/s12671-019-01245-0

Research Areas:

Education
Mindfulness (Psychology)
Nicotine addiction
Oral medication
Research
Smoking Cessation