Susan Dent

Overview:

Medical Oncologist with a focus on breast cancer
Associate Director of Breast Cancer Clinical Research
Co-Director Duke Cardio-Oncology Program

Positions:

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1990

McMaster University (Canada)

Internal Medicine

Royal College of Physicians (United Kingdom)

Medical Oncology

Royal College of Physicians (United Kingdom)

Grants:

CardiovAscular Risk profile and Treatment patterns in ER+HER2 - Advanced Breast Cancer: A retrospective cohort study (CAREB)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A PHASEIB/III STUDY OF IPATASERTIB PLUS PALBOCICLIB AND FULVESTRANT VERSUS PLACEBO PLUS PALBOCICLIB AND FULVESTRANT IN HORMONE RECEPTOR POSITIVE AND HER2 NEGATIVE LOCALLY ADVANCED UNRESECTABLE OR METASTATIC BREAST CANCER

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Cardio-oncology care in the era of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic: An International Cardio-Oncology Society (ICOS) statement.

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has given rise to a pandemic of unprecedented proportions in the modern era because of its highly contagious nature and impact on human health and society: coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Patients with cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and established CV disease (CVD) are among those initially identified at the highest risk for serious complications, including death. Subsequent studies have pointed out that patients with cancer are also at high risk for a critical disease course. Therefore, the most vulnerable patients are seemingly those with both cancer and CVD, and a careful, unified approach in the evaluation and management of this patient population is especially needed in times of the COVID-19 pandemic. This review provides an overview of the unique implications of the viral outbreak for the field of cardio-oncology and outlines key modifications in the approach to this ever-increasing patient population. These modifications include a shift toward greater utilization of cardiac biomarkers and a more focused CV imaging approach in the broader context of modifications to typical practice pathways. The goal of this strategic adjustment is to minimize the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection (or other future viral outbreaks) while not becoming negligent of CVD and its important impact on the overall outcomes of patients who are being treated for cancer.
Authors
Lenihan, D; Carver, J; Porter, C; Liu, JE; Dent, S; Thavendiranathan, P; Mitchell, JD; Nohria, A; Fradley, MG; Pusic, I; Stockerl-Goldstein, K; Blaes, A; Lyon, AR; Ganatra, S; López-Fernández, T; O'Quinn, R; Minotti, G; Szmit, S; Cardinale, D; Alvarez-Cardona, J; Curigliano, G; Neilan, TG; Herrmann, J
MLA Citation
Lenihan, Daniel, et al. “Cardio-oncology care in the era of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic: An International Cardio-Oncology Society (ICOS) statement.Ca Cancer J Clin, vol. 70, no. 6, Nov. 2020, pp. 480–504. Pubmed, doi:10.3322/caac.21635.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1460013
PMID
32910493
Source
pubmed
Published In
Ca: a Cancer Journal for Clinicians
Volume
70
Published Date
Start Page
480
End Page
504
DOI
10.3322/caac.21635

Cardio-Oncology in the Era of the COVID-19 Pandemic and Beyond.

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has emerged as a global pandemic and public health crisis. Increasing waves of intermittent infectious outbreaks have dramatically influenced care among broad populations. Over the past 2 decades, there has been a rapid increase in cancer survival, with >400 000 new survivors each year. The increasingly common presence of cardiovascular disease in patients during or after cancer treatment led to the rapid growth of the field of cardio-oncology with a mandate of identifying, treating, and preventing the various forms of cardiovascular disease seen among this population. This review evaluates the implications of the pandemic on the practice and study of cardio-oncology. The evolving understanding of the relationship between comorbid disease and clinical outcomes among this population is assessed. With the impetus of the pandemic, cardio-oncology can be deliberate in embracing changes to cardiac screening, monitoring, and intervention during oncology care. Bridging 2 specialties, consideration of the lessons learned in cancer and cardiovascular may pivotally inform ongoing therapeutic efforts. Further, the development of multicenter registries focused on understanding and optimizing outcomes among these patients should be considered. Together, these insights may critically inform strategies for the care of cardio-oncology patients in future phases of the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.
Authors
Addison, D; Campbell, CM; Guha, A; Ghosh, AK; Dent, SF; Jneid, H
MLA Citation
Addison, Daniel, et al. “Cardio-Oncology in the Era of the COVID-19 Pandemic and Beyond.J Am Heart Assoc, vol. 9, no. 19, Oct. 2020, p. e017787. Pubmed, doi:10.1161/JAHA.120.017787.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1453203
PMID
32713239
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of the American Heart Association
Volume
9
Published Date
Start Page
e017787
DOI
10.1161/JAHA.120.017787

Strategies to Prevent Cardiovascular Toxicity in Breast Cancer: Is It Ready for Primetime?

Cardio-oncology is an emerging field tasked with identifying and treating cancer therapy related cardiac dysfunction (e.g., cytotoxic agents, immunotherapies, radiation, and hormone therapies) and optimizing the cardiovascular health of cancer patients exposed to these agents. Novel cancer therapies have led to significant improvements in clinical outcomes for breast cancer patients. In this article, we review the current literature on assessing cardiovascular risk of breast cancer therapies and discuss strategies (including pharmacological and lifestyle interventions) to prevent cardiovascular toxicity.
Authors
Kikuchi, R; Shah, NP; Dent, SF
MLA Citation
Kikuchi, Robin, et al. “Strategies to Prevent Cardiovascular Toxicity in Breast Cancer: Is It Ready for Primetime?J Clin Med, vol. 9, no. 4, Mar. 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.3390/jcm9040896.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1436080
PMID
32218132
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Clinical Medicine
Volume
9
Published Date
DOI
10.3390/jcm9040896

Optimizing Cardiovascular Health in Patients With Cancer: A Practical Review of Risk Assessment, Monitoring, and Prevention of Cancer Treatment-Related Cardiovascular Toxicity.

Advances in cancer screening and improved treatment approaches have led to an increase in survivorship and, consequently, recognition of an association between cancer treatments and the development of cardiovascular complications. In addition, as the population becomes proportionally older, comorbid cardiovascular risk factors are more prevalent in the population and compound the risk of developing cancer treatment-related cardiovascular toxicity. Cardio-oncology has emerged as a new subspecialty of medicine that provides a multidisciplinary approach, bringing together oncologists, cardiologists, and allied health care providers who are tasked with optimizing the cardiovascular health of patients exposed to potentially cardiotoxic cancer therapy. Using a case-based approach, practical advice on how to identify, monitor, and treat patients with cancer who are at risk for developing cancer treatment-related cardiovascular dysfunction is discussed. Cardiovascular risk factors (e.g., age, hypertension, diabetes) and cancer therapies (chemotherapy, targeted therapy, radiation) associated with cardiovascular toxicity are presented. Current cardiac monitoring strategies such as two- and three-dimensional echocardiography, cardiac MRI, and biomarkers (troponin and brain natriuretic peptide [BNP]) are discussed. Last, the current literature on pharmacologic (e.g., angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, β-blockers, statins) and lifestyle (diet and exercise) strategies to mitigate cardiovascular toxicity during and following completion of cancer therapy are reviewed.
Authors
Dent, SF; Kikuchi, R; Kondapalli, L; Ismail-Khan, R; Brezden-Masley, C; Barac, A; Fradley, M
MLA Citation
Dent, Susan F., et al. “Optimizing Cardiovascular Health in Patients With Cancer: A Practical Review of Risk Assessment, Monitoring, and Prevention of Cancer Treatment-Related Cardiovascular Toxicity.Am Soc Clin Oncol Educ Book, vol. 40, Mar. 2020, pp. 1–15. Pubmed, doi:10.1200/EDBK_286019.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1436079
PMID
32213102
Source
pubmed
Published In
Am Soc Clin Oncol Educ Book
Volume
40
Published Date
Start Page
1
End Page
15
DOI
10.1200/EDBK_286019

Abstract P5-14-11: Cardiac monitoring in advanced breast cancer patients treated with trastuzumab: Does it improve cardiac safety?

Authors
Rushton-Marovac, MK; Lima, I; Tuna, M; Melloni, C; Pritchard, K; Hawken, S; Dent, SF
MLA Citation
Rushton-Marovac, Moira K., et al. “Abstract P5-14-11: Cardiac monitoring in advanced breast cancer patients treated with trastuzumab: Does it improve cardiac safety?Poster Session Abstracts, American Association for Cancer Research, 2020. Crossref, doi:10.1158/1538-7445.sabcs19-p5-14-11.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1442702
Source
crossref
Published In
Poster Session Abstracts
Published Date
DOI
10.1158/1538-7445.sabcs19-p5-14-11