Gayathri Devi

Overview:

Dr. Devi’s research interests include functional genomics, anti-cancer drug discovery and development, mechanisms of cancer cell signaling, tumor immunity and applications thereof for overcoming therapeutic resistance in cancer.

The lab has established prostate, inflammatory breast cancer and ovarian cellular and tumor models.

Positions:

Associate Professor in Surgery

Surgery, Surgical Sciences
School of Medicine

Associate Professor in Pathology

Pathology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 1998

University of Nebraska College of Medicine

Grants:

Resveratrol, Carbohydrate Restriction and Prostate Cancer Progression

Administered By
Surgery, Urology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Investigator
Start Date
End Date

GLI1 Inhibition to Enhance Chemo- and Targeted-Therapies in Inflammatory Breast Cancer

Administered By
Surgery, Surgical Sciences
Awarded By
North Carolina Central University
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Role of XIAP in Therapeutic Resistance in Inflammatory Breast Cancer

Administered By
Surgery
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Environmental Quality and Invasive Breast Cancer.

BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is a complex and multifactorial disease, and environmental factors have been suggested to increase its risk. However, prior research has largely focused on studying exposures to one factor/contaminant at a time, which does not reflect the real-world environment. METHODS: Herein, we investigate associations between breast cancer and the Environmental Quality Index (EQI), a comprehensive assessment of five domains of environmental quality (air, water, land, sociodemographic, and built) at the county level. Breast cancer diagnoses for North Carolina women were obtained from the North Carolina Central Cancer Registry (2009-2014) and the county of residence at the time of diagnosis was linked with the EQI. We evaluated the odds of localized, regional, or distant metastatic breast cancer in categories of environmental quality using women with carcinoma in situ as registry-based controls. RESULTS: Overall environmental quality was generally not associated with invasive breast cancer; however, all breast cancer types tended to be inversely associated with land quality, particularly in more rural communities [distant metastatic breast cancer was 5-8% more likely (OR 1.08; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.14, p=0.02) compared to carcinoma in situ]. CONCLUSIONS: Cumulatively, our results suggest that some broad measures of environmental quality are associated with invasive breast cancer but that associations vary by environmental domain, cancer stage, subtype, and urbanicity. IMPACT: Our findings suggest that components of land quality (e.g. pesticide applications and animal facilities) warrant additional investigation in relation to invasive breast cancer.
Authors
Gearhart-Serna, LM; Hoffman, K; Devi, GR
MLA Citation
Gearhart-Serna, Larisa M., et al. “Environmental Quality and Invasive Breast Cancer.Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev, Apr. 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-19-1497.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1436877
PMID
32238404
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev
Published Date
DOI
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-19-1497

Advancement of multidisciplinary education and research in translational sciences: MERITS program development at Duke University.

Introduction: The Duke Multidisciplinary Education and Research in Translational Sciences Program provides educational resources for faculty and trainees in translational research. Methods: To aid in program development, we assessed perceptions of translational science through focus groups targeting different career stages. Results: In total, 3 essential themes emerged: collaboration, movement toward application, and public health impact. Facilitators and barriers varied among groups. Conclusion: Training programs must provide specific strategies for collaboration and selectively accelerating discoveries to therapies.
Authors
Freel, SA; Fish, LJ; Mirman, B; Sudan, R; Devi, GR
MLA Citation
Freel, Stephanie A., et al. “Advancement of multidisciplinary education and research in translational sciences: MERITS program development at Duke University.J Clin Transl Sci, vol. 2, no. 1, Feb. 2018, pp. 57–62. Pubmed, doi:10.1017/cts.2018.17.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1417917
PMID
31660219
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Clinical and Translational Science
Volume
2
Published Date
Start Page
57
End Page
62
DOI
10.1017/cts.2018.17

Islet Xenotransplantation: A Quest for Clinically Available Immunosuppression Regimens.

Authors
Fitch, ZW; Gao, Q; Davis, RP; Mulvihill, MS; Song, M; Leopardi, F; Ribeiro, M; How, T; Reimann, K; Devi, GR; Collins, BH; Kirk, AD
MLA Citation
Fitch, Z. W., et al. “Islet Xenotransplantation: A Quest for Clinically Available Immunosuppression Regimens.American Journal of Transplantation, vol. 19, WILEY, 2019, pp. 473–74.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1402359
Source
wos
Published In
American Journal of Transplantation : Official Journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons
Volume
19
Published Date
Start Page
473
End Page
474

CD46 Transgene Modification and Thrombosis in Neonatal Porcine Islet Xenotransplantation.

Authors
Song, M; Samy, K; Gao, Q; Davis, RP; Leopard, F; Fitch, Z; Bennett, C; Devi, GR; Collins, BH; Kirk, AD
MLA Citation
Song, M., et al. “CD46 Transgene Modification and Thrombosis in Neonatal Porcine Islet Xenotransplantation.American Journal of Transplantation, vol. 19, WILEY, 2019, pp. 430–430.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1402758
Source
wos
Published In
American Journal of Transplantation : Official Journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons
Volume
19
Published Date
Start Page
430
End Page
430

Removal of 2, 4 dichlorophenol from aqueous medium using chemically modified low-cost adsorbent: Kinetics, isotherm, thermodynamics and regeneration studies

© 2019 Desalination Publications. All rights reserved. Elimination of 2,4 D from water bodies is very much essential and possible using adsorption. Using commercial adsorbents, removal of 2,4 D can be efficient but requires high operating cost and hence this study focuses on feasibility of producing Activated Carbon (AC) from agricultural residue for removing the 2,4 D from aqueous solutions was analyzed. The adsorbent prepared using the chemical method with phosphoric acid at 1:2 ratio and activated at 500°C, washed and dried AC was characterized for understanding its properties. Batch adsorption analysis of 2, 4 D adsorption on AC was conducted to study the effects of initial 2, 4 D concentration (200 mg/L to 1000 mg/L), pH (2–12), contact time (0–360 min) and temperature (30–50°C). The adsorption efficacy of prepared AC on 2, 4 D was determined with the optimized adsorbing conditions. The equilibrium data were analyzed using different isotherm models (Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, and Dubinin Radushkevich) and kinetics models (Pseudo-first order, Pseudo-second order). Also, the adsorption mechanism was found using the intra-particle diffusion model. The activated carbon from the selected agricultural residue was shown to be an efficient adsorbent by removing 87.59% of 2, 4 D. The thermodynamic and regeneration studies were carried out to find the feasibility and reusability of adsorbent. From the results, it was confirmed that the system follows Langmuir isotherm, Pseudo-second order and the reaction is spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The maximum regeneration of adsorbent was obtained using NaOH among the other eluents.
Authors
Devi, GR; Lakshmi, DV; Gandhi, NN
MLA Citation
Devi, G. R., et al. “Removal of 2, 4 dichlorophenol from aqueous medium using chemically modified low-cost adsorbent: Kinetics, isotherm, thermodynamics and regeneration studies.” Desalination and Water Treatment, vol. 156, 2019, pp. 331–39. Scopus, doi:10.5004/dwt.2019.23863.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1393862
Source
scopus
Published In
Desalination and Water Treatment
Volume
156
Published Date
Start Page
331
End Page
339
DOI
10.5004/dwt.2019.23863