Caroline Dorfman

Overview:

Caroline Dorfman, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University. Dr. Dorfman is a member of the Duke Pain Prevention and Treatment Research Program and the Duke Cancer Institute. Dr. Dorfman completed her graduate training in clinical psychology at the Ohio State University and her clinical internship at Duke University Medical Center. Her research focuses on developing, implementing, and evaluating psychosocial and behavioral interventions designed to meet the needs of cancer survivors and their partners/families.

Positions:

Assistant Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 2015

Ohio State University

Grants:

Publications:

WEIGHT-RELATED BEHAVIORS OF CANCER SURVIVORS & PARTNERS: INTERVENTION DEVELOPMENT AND RESULTS OF A PILOT DYADIC INTERVENTION

Authors
Dorfman, CS; Winger, JG; Somers, T; Shelby, RA; Kimmick, G; Craighead, L; Patel, ML; Keefe, FJ
MLA Citation
Dorfman, Caroline S., et al. “WEIGHT-RELATED BEHAVIORS OF CANCER SURVIVORS & PARTNERS: INTERVENTION DEVELOPMENT AND RESULTS OF A PILOT DYADIC INTERVENTION.” Annals of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 53, OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC, 2019, pp. S709–S709.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1398066
Source
wos
Published In
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume
53
Published Date
Start Page
S709
End Page
S709

QUALITATIVE FEEDBACK ON A PSYCHOSOCIAL PAIN MANAGEMENT INTERVENTION FOR PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED CANCER

Authors
MLA Citation
Winger, Joseph G., et al. “QUALITATIVE FEEDBACK ON A PSYCHOSOCIAL PAIN MANAGEMENT INTERVENTION FOR PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED CANCER.” Annals of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 53, OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC, 2019, pp. S264–S264.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1397866
Source
wos
Published In
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume
53
Published Date
Start Page
S264
End Page
S264

PERCEIVED SOCIAL SUPPORT IS RELEVANT IN THE MANAGEMENT OF PAIN AND DEPRESSION AMONG ADULTS WITH SICKLE CELL DISEASE (SCD)

Authors
Choi, K; Dorfman, C; Putilin, D; Wood, M; Feliu, M; Barker, C; Reif, R; Edwards, C
MLA Citation
Choi, Karmel, et al. “PERCEIVED SOCIAL SUPPORT IS RELEVANT IN THE MANAGEMENT OF PAIN AND DEPRESSION AMONG ADULTS WITH SICKLE CELL DISEASE (SCD).” Psychosomatic Medicine, vol. 77, no. 3, LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, 2015, pp. A6–A6.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1163863
Source
wos
Published In
Psychosomatic Medicine
Volume
77
Published Date
Start Page
A6
End Page
A6

Absence of carboxypeptidase E leads to adult hippocampal neuronal degeneration and memory deficits.

Molecules that govern the formation, integrity, and function of the hippocampus remain an important area of investigation. Here we show that absence of the proneuropeptide processing enzyme, carboxypeptidase E (CPE) in CPE knock-out (KO) mice had a profound effect on memory, synaptic physiology, and the cytoarchitecture of the hippocampus in these animals. Adult CPE-KO mice displayed deficits in memory consolidation as revealed by the water-maze, object preference, and social transmission of food preference tests. These mice also showed no evoked long-term potentiation. Additionally, CPE-KO mice at 4 weeks of age and older, but not at 3 weeks of age, exhibited marked degeneration specifically of the pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA3 region which normally expresses high levels of CPE. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the neuronal marker, NeuN, was reduced, while the glial marker, GFAP, was increased, characteristic of gliosis in the CA3 area of CPE-KO mice. Calbindin staining indicated early termination of the mossy fibers before reaching the CA1 region in these mice. Thus, absence of CPE leads to degeneration of the CA3 neurons and perturbation of the cytoarchitecture of the hippocampus. Ex vivo studies showed that overexpression of CPE in cultured hippocampal neurons protected them against H(2)O(2) oxidative-stress induced cell death. These findings taken together indicate that CPE is essential for the survival of adult hippocampal CA3 neurons to maintain normal cognitive function.
Authors
Woronowicz, A; Koshimizu, H; Chang, S-Y; Cawley, NX; Hill, JM; Rodriguiz, RM; Abebe, D; Dorfman, C; Senatorov, V; Zhou, A; Xiong, Z-G; Wetsel, WC; Loh, YP
MLA Citation
Woronowicz, Alicja, et al. “Absence of carboxypeptidase E leads to adult hippocampal neuronal degeneration and memory deficits..” Hippocampus, vol. 18, no. 10, 2008, pp. 1051–63. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/hipo.20462.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub744553
PMID
18570185
Source
pubmed
Published In
Hippocampus
Volume
18
Published Date
Start Page
1051
End Page
1063
DOI
10.1002/hipo.20462

Reminders of cancer risk and pain catastrophizing: relationships with cancer worry and perceived risk in women with a first-degree relative with breast cancer.

First-degree relatives of women with breast cancer may experience increased worry or perceived risk when faced with reminders of their own cancer risk. Worry and risk reminders may include physical symptoms (e.g., persistent breast pain) and caregiving experiences. Women who engage in pain catastrophizing may be particularly likely to experience increased distress when risk reminders are present. We examined the degree to which persistent breast pain and experience as a cancer caregiver were related to cancer worry and perceived risk in first-degree relatives of women with breast cancer (N = 85) and how catastrophic thoughts about breast pain could impact these relationships. There was a significant interaction between persistent breast pain and pain catastrophizing in predicting cancer worry (p = .03); among women who engaged in pain catastrophizing, cancer worry remained high even in the absence of breast pain. Pain catastrophizing also moderated the relationships between caregiving involvement and cancer worry (p = .003) and perceived risk (p = .03). As the degree of caregiving responsibility increased, cancer worry and perceived risk increased for women who engaged in pain catastrophizing; levels of cancer worry and perceived risk remained low and stable for women who did not engage in pain catastrophizing regardless of caregiving experience. The results suggest that first-degree relatives of breast cancer survivors who engage in pain catastrophizing may experience greater cancer worry and perceived risk and may benefit from interventions aimed at reducing catastrophic thoughts about pain.
Authors
Whitney, CA; Dorfman, CS; Shelby, RA; Keefe, FJ; Gandhi, V; Somers, TJ
MLA Citation
Whitney, Colette A., et al. “Reminders of cancer risk and pain catastrophizing: relationships with cancer worry and perceived risk in women with a first-degree relative with breast cancer..” Fam Cancer, vol. 18, no. 1, Jan. 2019, pp. 9–18. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s10689-018-0082-6.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1313744
PMID
29679190
Source
pubmed
Published In
Fam Cancer
Volume
18
Published Date
Start Page
9
End Page
18
DOI
10.1007/s10689-018-0082-6