Holly Dressman

Positions:

Research Professor in Molecular Genetics and Microbiology

Molecular Genetics and Microbiology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.S. 1988

North Carolina State University

Ph.D. 1994

Pennsylvania State University

Postdoctoral Fellow, Molecular Genetics

NIEHS

Grants:

Biodosimetry High-Throughput Test RFP-16-100-SOL-00010

Administered By
Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
Awarded By
DxTerity Diagnostics
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Point of Care Biodosimeter

Administered By
Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
Awarded By
Department of Health and Human Services
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Intellectual Property Challenges for the Development of Genomic Diagnostics

Administered By
University Institutes and Centers
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Collaborator
Start Date
End Date

Novel Zebrafish Models to Study Toxicity of PCBs and Pesticides During Pregnancy

Administered By
Biomedical Engineering
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Advisor
Start Date
End Date

Neurosciences Microarray Center

Administered By
Neurobiology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Mircroarray Manager
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

The Pediatric Obesity Microbiome and Metabolism Study (POMMS): Methods, Baseline Data, and Early Insights.

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to establish a biorepository of clinical, metabolomic, and microbiome samples from adolescents with obesity as they undergo lifestyle modification. METHODS: A total of 223 adolescents aged 10 to 18 years with BMI ≥95th percentile were enrolled, along with 71 healthy weight participants. Clinical data, fasting serum, and fecal samples were collected at repeated intervals over 6 months. Herein, the study design, data collection methods, and interim analysis-including targeted serum metabolite measurements and fecal 16S ribosomal RNA gene amplicon sequencing among adolescents with obesity (n = 27) and healthy weight controls (n = 27)-are presented. RESULTS: Adolescents with obesity have higher serum alanine aminotransferase, C-reactive protein, and glycated hemoglobin, and they have lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol when compared with healthy weight controls. Metabolomics revealed differences in branched-chain amino acid-related metabolites. Also observed was a differential abundance of specific microbial taxa and lower species diversity among adolescents with obesity when compared with the healthy weight group. CONCLUSIONS: The Pediatric Metabolism and Microbiome Study (POMMS) biorepository is available as a shared resource. Early findings suggest evidence of a metabolic signature of obesity unique to adolescents, along with confirmation of previously reported findings that describe metabolic and microbiome markers of obesity.
Authors
McCann, JR; Bihlmeyer, NA; Roche, K; Catherine, C; Jawahar, J; Kwee, LC; Younge, NE; Silverman, J; Ilkayeva, O; Sarria, C; Zizzi, A; Wootton, J; Poppe, L; Anderson, P; Arlotto, M; Wei, Z; Granek, JA; Valdivia, RH; David, LA; Dressman, HK; Newgard, CB; Shah, SH; Seed, PC; Rawls, JF; Armstrong, SC
MLA Citation
McCann, Jessica R., et al. “The Pediatric Obesity Microbiome and Metabolism Study (POMMS): Methods, Baseline Data, and Early Insights.Obesity (Silver Spring), vol. 29, no. 3, Mar. 2021, pp. 569–78. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/oby.23081.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1474621
PMID
33624438
Source
pubmed
Published In
Obesity (Silver Spring)
Volume
29
Published Date
Start Page
569
End Page
578
DOI
10.1002/oby.23081

The cancer microbiome atlas: a pan-cancer comparative analysis to distinguish tissue-resident microbiota from contaminants.

Studying the microbial composition of internal organs and their associations with disease remains challenging due to the difficulty of acquiring clinical biopsies. We designed a statistical model to analyze the prevalence of species across sample types from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), revealing that species equiprevalent across sample types are predominantly contaminants, bearing unique signatures from each TCGA-designated sequencing center. Removing such species mitigated batch effects and isolated the tissue-resident microbiome, which was validated by original matched TCGA samples. Gene copies and nucleotide variants can further distinguish mixed-evidence species. We, thus, present The Cancer Microbiome Atlas (TCMA), a collection of curated, decontaminated microbial compositions of oropharyngeal, esophageal, gastrointestinal, and colorectal tissues. This led to the discovery of prognostic species and blood signatures of mucosal barrier injuries and enabled systematic matched microbe-host multi-omic analyses, which will help guide future studies of the microbiome's role in human health and disease.
Authors
Dohlman, AB; Arguijo Mendoza, D; Ding, S; Gao, M; Dressman, H; Iliev, ID; Lipkin, SM; Shen, X
MLA Citation
Dohlman, Anders B., et al. “The cancer microbiome atlas: a pan-cancer comparative analysis to distinguish tissue-resident microbiota from contaminants.Cell Host Microbe, vol. 29, no. 2, Feb. 2021, pp. 281-298.e5. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.chom.2020.12.001.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1471127
PMID
33382980
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cell Host Microbe
Volume
29
Published Date
Start Page
281
End Page
298.e5
DOI
10.1016/j.chom.2020.12.001

Data from: The Cancer Microbiome Atlas (TCMA): A Pan-Cancer Comparative Analysis to Distinguish Organ-Associated Microbiota from Equiprevalent Contaminants

Authors
Shen, X; Ding, S; Dressman, H; Dohlman, AB; Gao, M; Arguijo-Mendoza, D; Lipkin, SM; Iliev, ID
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1472984
Source
crossref
Published Date
DOI
10.7924/r4rn36833

Short-Chain Fatty Acid Production by Gut Microbiota from Children with Obesity Differs According to Prebiotic Choice and Bacterial Community Composition.

Pediatric obesity remains a public health burden and continues to increase in prevalence. The gut microbiota plays a causal role in obesity and is a promising therapeutic target. Specifically, the microbial production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) from the fermentation of otherwise indigestible dietary carbohydrates may protect against pediatric obesity and metabolic syndrome. Still, it has not been demonstrated that therapies involving microbiota-targeting carbohydrates, known as prebiotics, will enhance gut bacterial SCFA production in children and adolescents with obesity (age, 10 to 18 years old). Here, we used an in vitro system to examine the SCFA production by fecal microbiota from 17 children with obesity when exposed to five different commercially available over-the-counter (OTC) prebiotic supplements. We found microbiota from all 17 patients actively metabolized most prebiotics. Still, supplements varied in their acidogenic potential. Significant interdonor variation also existed in SCFA production, which 16S rRNA sequencing supported as being associated with differences in the host microbiota composition. Last, we found that neither fecal SCFA concentration, microbiota SCFA production capacity, nor markers of obesity positively correlated with one another. Together, these in vitro findings suggest the hypothesis that OTC prebiotic supplements may be unequal in their ability to stimulate SCFA production in children and adolescents with obesity and that the most acidogenic prebiotic may differ across individuals.IMPORTANCE Pediatric obesity remains a major public health problem in the United States, where 17% of children and adolescents are obese, and rates of pediatric "severe obesity" are increasing. Children and adolescents with obesity face higher health risks, and noninvasive therapies for pediatric obesity often have limited success. The human gut microbiome has been implicated in adult obesity, and microbiota-directed therapies can aid weight loss in adults with obesity. However, less is known about the microbiome in pediatric obesity, and microbiota-directed therapies are understudied in children and adolescents. Our research has two important findings: (i) dietary prebiotics (fiber) result in the microbiota from adolescents with obesity producing more SCFA, and (ii) the effectiveness of each prebiotic is donor dependent. Together, these findings suggest that prebiotic supplements could help children and adolescents with obesity, but that these therapies may not be "one size fits all."
Authors
Holmes, ZC; Silverman, JD; Dressman, HK; Wei, Z; Dallow, EP; Armstrong, SC; Seed, PC; Rawls, JF; David, LA
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1453744
PMID
32788375
Source
pubmed
Published In
Mbio
Volume
11
Published Date
DOI
10.1128/mBio.00914-20

RNA splicing and aggregate gene expression differences in lung squamous cell carcinoma between patients of West African and European ancestry.

OBJECTIVES: Despite disparities in lung cancer incidence and mortality, the molecular landscape of lung cancer in patients of African ancestry remains underexplored, and race-related differences in RNA splicing remain unexplored. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We identified differentially spliced genes (DSGs) and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in biobanked lung squamous cell carcinoma (LUSC) between patients of West African and European ancestry, using ancestral genotyping and Affymetrix Clariom D array. DSGs and DEGs were validated independently using the National Cancer Institute Genomic Data Commons. Associated biological processes, overlapping canonical pathways, enriched gene sets, and cancer relevance were identified using Gene Ontology Consortium, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, and CancerMine, respectively. Association with LUSC survival was conducted using The Cancer Genome Atlas. RESULTS: 4,829 DSGs and 267 DEGs were identified, including novel targets in NSCLC as well as genes identified previously to have relevance to NSCLC. RNA splicing events within 3 DSGs as well as 1 DEG were validated in the independent cohort. 853 DSGs and 29 DEGs have been implicated as potential drivers, oncogenes and/or tumor suppressor genes. Biological processes enriched among DSGs and DEGs included metabolic process, biological regulation, and multicellular organismal process and, among DSGs, ion transport. Overlapping canonical pathways among DSGs included neuronal signaling pathways and, among DEGs, cell metabolism involving biosynthesis. Gene sets enriched among DSGs included KRAS Signaling, UV Response, E2 F Targets, Glycolysis, and Coagulation. 355 RNA splicing events within DSGs and 18 DEGs show potential association with LUSC patient survival. CONCLUSION: These DSGs and DEGs, which show potential biological and clinical relevance, could have the ability to drive novel biomarker and therapeutic development to mitigate LUSC disparities.
Authors
Deveaux, AE; Allen, TA; Al Abo, M; Qin, X; Zhang, D; Patierno, BM; Gu, L; Gray, JE; Pecot, CV; Dressman, HK; McCall, SJ; Kittles, RA; Hyslop, T; Owzar, K; Crawford, J; Patierno, SR; Clarke, JM; Freedman, JA
MLA Citation
Deveaux, April E., et al. “RNA splicing and aggregate gene expression differences in lung squamous cell carcinoma between patients of West African and European ancestry.Lung Cancer, vol. 153, Mar. 2021, pp. 90–98. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.lungcan.2021.01.015.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1472476
PMID
33465699
Source
pubmed
Published In
Lung Cancer
Volume
153
Published Date
Start Page
90
End Page
98
DOI
10.1016/j.lungcan.2021.01.015