William Eward

Overview:

I am an Orthopaedic Oncologist, with dual clinical degrees (MD and DVM).  I treat complex sarcomas in people and animals.  My laboratory studies comparative oncology - discoveries we can make about cancer by analyses across different species.

Positions:

Frank H. Bassett III, M. D. Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

Orthopaedic Surgery
School of Medicine

Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

Orthopaedic Surgery
School of Medicine

Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

Orthopaedic Surgery
School of Medicine

Associate Professor of Pathology

Pathology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2006

University of Vermont, College of Medicine

Grants:

Bortezomib: A novel treatment to improve outcomes in dogs with osteosarcoma

Administered By
Orthopaedic Surgery
Awarded By
Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Intraoperative detection and ablation of microscopic residual cancer in the tumor bed

Administered By
Orthopaedic Surgery
Awarded By
Lumicell Diagnostics
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Prospective Observational Study of Intraoperative Angiography for Predicting Wound Complications in Irradiated Soft Tissue Sarcoma of the Extremities

Administered By
Orthopaedic Surgery
Awarded By
Piedmont Orthopedic Foundation
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

SCH: Overcoming the Intraoperative Data Desert: Biophotonics, Advanced Sensing, and Control for Automated Surgery

Administered By
Neurosurgery
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Phase 1 Study of X-PACT (X-ray Psoralen Activated Cancer Therapy)

Awarded By
Immunolight, LLC
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Hydropneumodissection-Assisted Cryoablation of Recurrent Sarcoma Adjacent to the Sciatic Nerve as a Limb-Sparing Alternative to Hindquarter Amputation.

MLA Citation
Sag, Alan A., et al. “Hydropneumodissection-Assisted Cryoablation of Recurrent Sarcoma Adjacent to the Sciatic Nerve as a Limb-Sparing Alternative to Hindquarter Amputation.J Vasc Interv Radiol, vol. 34, no. 5, May 2023, pp. 923-926.e1. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jvir.2022.12.469.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1561049
PMID
36584809
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Vasc Interv Radiol
Volume
34
Published Date
Start Page
923
End Page
926.e1
DOI
10.1016/j.jvir.2022.12.469

Exportin 1 (XPO1) inhibition alone or in combination as a novel therapeutic strategy in osteosarcoma

Authors
Graves, L; Rupprecht, G; Altunel, E; Flamant, EM; Rao, S; Sivara, D; Lazarides, AL; Hoskinson, SM; Sheth, MU; Cheng, S; Kim, SY; Ware, KE; Agarwal, A; Cullen, MM; Syal, C; Selmic, LE; Everitt, JI; McCall, SJ; Eward, C; Kashyap, T; Maloof, M; Walker, CJ; Landesman, Y; Wagner, L; Eward, WC; Hsu, DS; Somarelli, JA
MLA Citation
Graves, Laurie, et al. “Exportin 1 (XPO1) inhibition alone or in combination as a novel therapeutic strategy in osteosarcoma.” Cancer Research, vol. 82, no. 12, 2022.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1571402
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Cancer Research
Volume
82
Published Date

Defining the relevance of surgical margins. Part two: Strategies to improve prediction of recurrence risk.

Due to the complex nature of tumour biology and the integration between host tissues and molecular processes of the tumour cells, a continued reliance on the status of the microscopic cellular margin should not remain our only determinant of the success of a curative-intent surgery for patients with cancer. Based on current evidence, relying on a purely cellular focus to provide a binary indication of treatment success can provide an incomplete interpretation of potential outcome. A more holistic analysis of the cancer margin may be required. If we are to move ahead from our current situation - and allow treatment plans to be more intelligently tailored to meet the requirements of each individual tumour - we need to improve our utilisation of techniques that either improve recognition of residual tumour cells within the surgical field or enable a more comprehensive interrogation of tumour biology that identifies a risk of recurrence. In the second article in this series on defining the relevance of surgical margins, the authors discuss possible alternative strategies for margin assessment and evaluation in the canine and feline cancer patient. These strategies include considering adoption of the residual tumour classification scheme; intra-operative imaging systems including fluorescence-guided surgery, optical coherence tomography and Raman spectroscopy; molecular analysis and whole transcriptome analysis of tissues; and the development of a biologic index (nomogram). These techniques may allow evaluation of individual tumour biology and the status of the resection margin in ways that are different to our current techniques. Ultimately, these techniques seek to better define the risk of tumour recurrence following surgery and provide the surgeon and patient with more confidence in margin assessment.
Authors
Bray, J; Eward, W; Breen, M
MLA Citation
Bray, Jonathan, et al. “Defining the relevance of surgical margins. Part two: Strategies to improve prediction of recurrence risk.Vet Comp Oncol, Feb. 2023. Pubmed, doi:10.1111/vco.12881.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1565446
PMID
36745110
Source
pubmed
Published In
Vet Comp Oncol
Published Date
DOI
10.1111/vco.12881

Inequitable distribution of plastic benefits and burdens on economies and public health

Plastic heterogeneously affects social systems – notably human health and local and global economies. Here we discuss illustrative examples of the benefits and burdens of each stage of the plastic lifecycle (e.g., macroplastic production, consumption, recycling). We find the benefits to communities and stakeholders are principally economic, whereas burdens fall largely on human health. Furthermore, the economic benefits of plastic are rarely applied to alleviate or mitigate the health burdens it creates, amplifying the disconnect between who benefits and who is burdened. In some instances, social enterprises in low-wealth areas collect and recycle waste, creating a market for upcycled goods. While such endeavors generate local socioeconomic benefits, they perpetuate a status quo in which the burden of responsibility for waste management falls on downstream communities, rather than on producers who have generated far greater economic benefits. While the traditional cost-benefit analyses that inform decision-making disproportionately weigh economic benefits over the indirect, and often unquantifiable, costs of health burdens, we stress the need to include the health burdens of plastic to all impacted stakeholders across all plastic life stages in policy design. We therefore urge the Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee to consider all available knowledge on the deleterious effects of plastic across the entire plastic lifecycle while drafting the upcoming international global plastic treaty.
Authors
Karasik, R; Lauer, NE; Baker, AE; Lisi, NE; Somarelli, JA; Eward, WC; Fürst, K; Dunphy-Daly, MM
MLA Citation
Karasik, R., et al. “Inequitable distribution of plastic benefits and burdens on economies and public health.” Frontiers in Marine Science, vol. 9, Jan. 2023. Scopus, doi:10.3389/fmars.2022.1017247.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1564834
Source
scopus
Published In
Frontiers in Marine Science
Volume
9
Published Date
DOI
10.3389/fmars.2022.1017247

Re: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Pubic Symphysis Urinary Fistula with Pubic Bone Osteomyelitis in the Treated Prostate Cancer Patient.

Authors
Elliott, SP
MLA Citation
Elliott, Sean P. “Re: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Pubic Symphysis Urinary Fistula with Pubic Bone Osteomyelitis in the Treated Prostate Cancer Patient.J Urol, vol. 204, no. 6, Dec. 2020, pp. 1372–73. Pubmed, doi:10.1097/JU.0000000000001279.01.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1566945
PMID
32956013
Source
pubmed
Published In
The Journal of Urology
Volume
204
Published Date
Start Page
1372
End Page
1373
DOI
10.1097/JU.0000000000001279.01