William Eward

Overview:

I am an Orthopaedic Oncologist, with dual clinical degrees (MD and DVM).  I treat complex sarcomas in people and animals.  My laboratory studies comparative oncology - discoveries we can make about cancer by analyses across different species.

Positions:

Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

Orthopaedics
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2006

University of Vermont, College of Medicine

Grants:

Bortezomib: A novel treatment to improve outcomes in dogs with osteosarcoma

Administered By
Orthopaedics
Awarded By
Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Intraoperative detection and ablation of microscopic residual cancer in the tumor bed

Administered By
Orthopaedics
Awarded By
Lumicell Diagnostics
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Prospective Observational Study of Intraoperative Angiography for Predicting Wound Complications in Irradiated Soft Tissue Sarcoma of the Extremities

Administered By
Orthopaedics
Awarded By
Piedmont Orthopedic Foundation
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

SCH: Overcoming the Intraoperative Data Desert: Biophotonics, Advanced Sensing, and Control for Automated Surgery

Administered By
Neurosurgery
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Phase 1 Study of X-PACT (X-ray Psoralen Activated Cancer Therapy)

Administered By
Orthopaedics
Awarded By
Immunolight, LLC
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

ASO Author Reflections: Identifying Modifiable and Non-Modifiable Risk Factors of Readmission and Short-Term Mortality in Chondrosarcoma.

Authors
MLA Citation
Lazarides, Alexander L., et al. “ASO Author Reflections: Identifying Modifiable and Non-Modifiable Risk Factors of Readmission and Short-Term Mortality in Chondrosarcoma.Ann Surg Oncol, Oct. 2021. Pubmed, doi:10.1245/s10434-021-10904-3.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1499473
PMID
34635971
Source
pubmed
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Published Date
DOI
10.1245/s10434-021-10904-3

Identifying Modifiable and Non-modifiable Risk Factors of Readmission and Short-Term Mortality in Chondrosarcoma: A National Cancer Database Study.

BACKGROUND: Limited data are available to inform the risk of readmission and short-term mortality in musculoskeletal oncology. The goal of this study was to identify factors independently associated with 30-day readmission and 90-day mortality following surgical resection of chondrosarcoma. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 6653 patients following surgical resection of primary chondrosarcoma in the National Cancer Database (2004-2017). Both demographic and clinicopathologic variables were assessed for correlation with readmission and short-term mortality utilizing univariate and multivariate logistic regression modeling. RESULTS: Of 220 readmissions (3.26%), risk factors independently associated with an increased risk of unplanned 30-day readmission included Charlson-Deyo Comorbidity Index (CDCC) (odds ratio [OR] 1.31; p = 0.027), increasing American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage (OR 1.31; p = 0.004), undergoing major amputation (OR 2.38; p = 0.001), and axial skeletal location (OR 1.51; p = 0.028). A total of 137 patients died within 90 days of surgery (2.25%). Risk factors associated with increased mortality included the CDCC (OR 1.60; p = 0.001), increasing age (OR 1.06; p < 0.001), having Medicaid insurance status (OR 3.453; p = 0.005), living in a zip code with a higher educational attainment (OR 1.59; p = 0.003), increasing AJCC stage (OR 2.32; p < 0.001), longer postoperative length of stay (OR 1.015; p = 0.033), and positive surgical margins (OR 2.75; p = 0.001). Although a majority of the cohort did not receive radiation therapy (88.8%), receiving radiotherapy (OR 0.132; p = 0.010) was associated with a decreased risk of short-term mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Several tumor, treatment, and patient factors can help inform the risk of readmission and short-term mortality in patients with surgically treated chondrosarcoma.
Authors
Evans, DR; Lazarides, AL; Cullen, MM; Somarelli, JA; Blazer, DG; Visguass, JD; Brigman, BE; Eward, WC
MLA Citation
Evans, Daniel R., et al. “Identifying Modifiable and Non-modifiable Risk Factors of Readmission and Short-Term Mortality in Chondrosarcoma: A National Cancer Database Study.Ann Surg Oncol, Sept. 2021. Pubmed, doi:10.1245/s10434-021-10802-8.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1497734
PMID
34570333
Source
pubmed
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Published Date
DOI
10.1245/s10434-021-10802-8

ASO Visual Abstract: Identifying Modifiable and Non-Modifiable Risk Factors of Readmission and Short-Term Mortality in Osteosarcoma-A National Cancer Database Study.

Authors
Evans, DR; Lazarides, AL; Cullen, MM; Visgauss, JD; Somarelli, JA; Blazer, D; Brigman, BE; Eward, WC
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1482797
PMID
34032958
Source
pubmed
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Published Date
DOI
10.1245/s10434-021-10131-w

A Zebrafish Model of Metastatic Colonization Pinpoints Cellular Mechanisms of Circulating Tumor Cell Extravasation.

Metastasis is a multistep process in which cells must detach, migrate/invade local structures, intravasate, circulate, extravasate, and colonize. A full understanding of the complexity of this process has been limited by the lack of ability to study these steps in isolation with detailed molecular analyses. Leveraging a comparative oncology approach, we injected canine osteosarcoma cells into the circulation of transgenic zebrafish with fluorescent blood vessels in a biologically dynamic metastasis extravasation model. Circulating tumor cell clusters that successfully extravasated the vasculature as multicellular units were isolated under <i>intravital</i> imaging (n = 6). These extravasation-positive tumor cell clusters sublines were then molecularly profiled by RNA-Seq. Using a systems-level analysis, we pinpointed the downregulation of KRAS signaling, immune pathways, and extracellular matrix (ECM) organization as enriched in extravasated cells (p < 0.05). Within the extracellular matrix remodeling pathway, we identified versican (<i>VCAN</i>) as consistently upregulated and central to the ECM gene regulatory network (p < 0.05). Versican expression is prognostic for a poorer metastasis-free and overall survival in patients with osteosarcoma. Together, our results provide a novel experimental framework to study discrete steps in the metastatic process. Using this system, we identify the versican/ECM network dysregulation as a potential contributor to osteosarcoma circulating tumor cell metastasis.
Authors
Allen, TA; Cullen, MM; Hawkey, N; Mochizuki, H; Nguyen, L; Schechter, E; Borst, L; Yoder, JA; Freedman, JA; Patierno, SR; Cheng, K; Eward, WC; Somarelli, JA
MLA Citation
Allen, Tyler A., et al. “A Zebrafish Model of Metastatic Colonization Pinpoints Cellular Mechanisms of Circulating Tumor Cell Extravasation.Frontiers in Oncology, vol. 11, Jan. 2021, p. 641187. Epmc, doi:10.3389/fonc.2021.641187.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1498525
PMID
34631514
Source
epmc
Published In
Frontiers in Oncology
Volume
11
Published Date
Start Page
641187
DOI
10.3389/fonc.2021.641187

The Utility of Chest Imaging for Surveillance of Atypical Lipomatous Tumors.

Unlike other soft tissue sarcomas, atypical lipomatous tumors (ALTs) are thought to have a low propensity for metastasis. Despite this, a standard of care for pulmonary metastasis (PM) surveillance has not been established. This study aimed to evaluate the utility of chest imaging for PM surveillance following ALT excision. This was a multi-institution, retrospective review of all patients with primary ALTs of the extremities or superficial torso who underwent excision between 2006 and 2018. Minimum follow-up was two years. Long-term survival was evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method. 190 patients with ALT were included. Average age was 61.7 years and average follow-up was 58.6 months (24 to 180 months). MDM2 testing was positive in 88 patients (46.3%), and 102 (53.7%) did not receive MDM2 testing. 188 patients (98.9%) had marginal excision, and 127 (66.8%) had marginal or positive margins. Patients received an average of 0.9 CT scans and 1.3 chest radiographs over the surveillance period. 10-year metastasis-free survival was 100%, with no documented deaths from disease. This study suggests that chest imaging does not have a significant role in PM surveillance following ALT excision, but advanced local imaging and chest surveillance may be considered in cases of local recurrence or concern for dedifferentiation.
Authors
Lazarides, AL; Ferlauto, HR; Burke, ZDC; Griffin, AM; Leckey, BD; Bernthal, NM; Wunder, JS; Ferguson, PC; Visgauss, JD; Brigman, BE; Eward, WC
MLA Citation
Lazarides, Alexander L., et al. “The Utility of Chest Imaging for Surveillance of Atypical Lipomatous Tumors.Sarcoma, vol. 2021, Jan. 2021, p. 4740924. Epmc, doi:10.1155/2021/4740924.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1499621
PMID
34671190
Source
epmc
Published In
Sarcoma
Volume
2021
Published Date
Start Page
4740924
DOI
10.1155/2021/4740924