Oluwadamilola Fayanju

Overview:

Dr. Fayanju is an Assistant Professor of Surgery and Population Health Sciences in the Duke University School of Medicine, Associate Director for Disparities & Value in Healthcare with Duke Forge (the university’s center for actionable data science: https://forge.duke.edu/oluwadamilola-fayanju-md-ma-mphs), and Director of the Durham VA Breast Clinic.

She received her undergraduate degree in History and Science and an MA in Comparative Literature from Harvard. She received her MD and a master of population health sciences (MPHS) from Washington University in St. Louis, where she also completed her residency in General Surgery. She completed fellowship training in Breast Surgical Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Her research, which is supported by an NIH K08 career development award, has 3 areas of focus: (1) addressing disparities in breast cancer presentation, treatment, outcome, and clinical trial participation; (2) improving prognostication and treatment for biologically aggressive variants of breast cancer that are often more common among racial and ethnic minorities; and (3) creating value in oncologic care, especially through the collection and application of patient-reported outcomes.

She is active in several national organizations, currently serving on the Board of Directors for the Surgical Outcomes Club and on various committees including the Breast, Cancer Care Delivery, and Health Disparities Committees for the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology; the Patient-reported Outcomes, Patient Safety and Quality, and Publications Committees for the American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBrS); the Program Committee for the Association for Academic Surgery (AAS); the Women in Surgery Committee for the Society of Black Academic Surgeons (SBAS); and the Locoregional and Patient-reported Outcomes Committees for the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC).

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Surgery

Surgical Oncology
School of Medicine

Assistant Professor in Population Health Sciences

Population Health Sciences
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

A.B. 2001

Harvard University

M.A. 2001

Harvard University

M.D. 2007

Washington University School of Medicine

MPHS 2011

Washington University School of Medicine

General Surgery Resident, Surgery

Washington University School of Medicine

Breast Surgical Oncology Fellow, Surgery

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Grants:

Publications:

Hiding in Plain Sight.

Authors
MLA Citation
Fayanju, Oluwadamilola Lola M. “Hiding in Plain Sight..” Jama, vol. 322, no. 22, Dec. 2019, pp. 2173–74. Pubmed, doi:10.1001/jama.2019.19326.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1011701
PMID
31821434
Source
pubmed
Published In
Jama
Volume
322
Published Date
Start Page
2173
End Page
2174
DOI
10.1001/jama.2019.19326

Correction to: Factors Associated with Reoperation in Breast-Conserving Surgery for Cancer: A Prospective Study of American Society of Breast Surgeon Members.

The Disclosures in the original article are incomplete. Not included is the following information.
Authors
Landercasper, J; Borgert, AJ; Fayanju, OM; Cody, H; Feldman, S; Greenberg, C; Linebarger, J; Pockaj, B; Wilke, L
MLA Citation
Landercasper, Jeffrey, et al. “Correction to: Factors Associated with Reoperation in Breast-Conserving Surgery for Cancer: A Prospective Study of American Society of Breast Surgeon Members..” Ann Surg Oncol, vol. 26, no. Suppl 3, Dec. 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.1245/s10434-019-07799-6.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1418714
PMID
31512023
Source
pubmed
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
26
Published Date
Start Page
891
DOI
10.1245/s10434-019-07799-6

Patient-reported outcomes in the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium.

Members of the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium conducted an expert-driven literature review to identify a list of domains and to evaluate potential measures of these domains for inclusion in a list of preferred measures. Measures were included if they were easily available, free of charge, and had acceptable psychometrics based on published peer-reviewed analyses. A total of 22 domains and 52 measures were identified during the selection process. Taken together, these measures form a reliable and validated list of measurement tools that are easily available and used in multiple cancer trials to assess patient-reported outcomes in relevant patients.
Authors
Bowen, DJ; Shinn, EH; Gregrowski, S; Kimmick, G; Dominici, LS; Frank, ES; Smith, KL; Rocque, G; Ruddy, KJ; Pollastro, T; Melisko, M; Ballinger, TJ; Fayanju, OM; Wolff, AC
MLA Citation
Bowen, Deborah J., et al. “Patient-reported outcomes in the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium..” Cancer, Nov. 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cncr.32615.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1421501
PMID
31743427
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Published Date
DOI
10.1002/cncr.32615

Nodal Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Predicts Receipt of Radiation Therapy after Breast Cancer Diagnosis.

BACKGROUND: Pathologic complete response (pCR) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) is associated with improved overall survival (OS) in breast-cancer patients, but it is unclear how post-NACT response influences radiotherapy administration in patients presenting with node-positive disease. We sought to determine whether nodal pCR is associated with likelihood of receiving nodal radiation and whether radiotherapy among patients experiencing nodal pCR is associated with improved OS. METHODS: cN1 female breast cancer patients diagnosed 2010-2015 who were ypN0 (i.e., nodal pCR, n=12,341) or ypN1 (i.e., residual disease, n=13,668) post-NACT were identified in the National Cancer Database. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with receiving radiotherapy. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to estimate the association between radiotherapy and adjusted OS. RESULTS: 26,009 patients were included. 43.9% (n=5,423) of ypN0 and 55.3% (n=7,556) of ypN1 patients received nodal radiation. Rates of nodal radiation remained the same over time among ypN0 patients (trend test p=0.29) but increased among ypN1 patients from 49% in 2010 to 59% in 2015 (trend test p<0.001). After adjusting for covariates, nodal pCR (vs no stage change) was associated with decreased likelihood of nodal radiation after mastectomy (∼20% decrease) and lumpectomy (∼30% decrease, both p<0.01). After mastectomy, nodal (vs no) radiation conferred no significant survival benefit in ypN0 patients but approached significance for ypN1 patients (hazard ratio [HR] 0.83, 95% CI 0.69-0.99, p=0.04, overall p-value=0.11). After lumpectomy, nodal radiation was associated with improved adjusted OS for ypN0 (HR 0.38, 95% CI 0.22-0.66) and ypN1 patients (HR 0.44, 95% CI 0.30-0.66, both p<0.001), but this improvement was not significantly greater than that associated with breast-only radiation. CONCLUSIONS: ypN0 patients were less likely to receive nodal radiation than ypN1 patients, suggesting that selective omission already occurs and, in the context of limited survival data, could potentially be appropriate for select patients.
MLA Citation
Fayanju, Oluwadamilola M., et al. “Nodal Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Predicts Receipt of Radiation Therapy after Breast Cancer Diagnosis..” Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys, Oct. 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2019.10.039.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1418091
PMID
31678225
Source
pubmed
Published In
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.ijrobp.2019.10.039

Educational Outcomes of a Pre-Clinical Medical Student Curriculum with Medicaid and Uninsured Surgical Oncology Patients

Authors
Olivere, LA; Rhodin, KE; Hong, C; Oyekunle, T; Howell, E; Giri, VK; Mehta, K; Tong, BC; Sosa, JA; Fayanju, OM
MLA Citation
Olivere, Lindsey A., et al. “Educational Outcomes of a Pre-Clinical Medical Student Curriculum with Medicaid and Uninsured Surgical Oncology Patients.” Journal of the American College of Surgeons, vol. 229, no. 4, ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2019, pp. S241–S241.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1421405
Source
wos
Published In
Journal of the American College of Surgeons
Volume
229
Published Date
Start Page
S241
End Page
S241