Oluwadamilola Fayanju

Overview:

Dr. Fayanju is an Associate Professor of Surgery and Population Health Sciences in the Duke University School of Medicine, Associate Director for Disparities & Value in Healthcare with Duke Forge (the university’s center for actionable data science: https://forge.duke.edu/oluwadamilola-fayanju-md-ma-mphs), and Director of the Durham VA Breast Clinic.

She received her undergraduate degree in History and Science and an MA in Comparative Literature from Harvard. She received her MD and a master of population health sciences (MPHS) from Washington University in St. Louis, where she also completed her residency in General Surgery. She completed fellowship training in Breast Surgical Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Her research, which is supported by an NIH K08 career development award, has 3 areas of focus: (1) addressing disparities in breast cancer presentation, treatment, outcome, and clinical trial participation; (2) improving prognostication and treatment for biologically aggressive variants of breast cancer that are often more common among racial and ethnic minorities; and (3) creating value in oncologic care, especially through the collection and application of patient-reported outcomes (PROs). Her scholarship has been published in a variety of journals including Annals of Surgery, Cancer, and JAMA.

She is active in several national organizations, currently serving on the Board of Directors for the Surgical Outcomes Club and on various committees including the Breast, Cancer Care Delivery, and Health Disparities Committees for the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology; the Patient-reported Outcomes, Patient Safety and Quality, and Publications Committees for the American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBrS); the Nominating and Program Committees for the Association for Academic Surgery (AAS); the Women in Surgery Committee for the Society of Black Academic Surgeons (SBAS); and the Locoregional and Patient-reported Outcomes Committees for the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC).

Positions:

Associate Professor of Surgery

Surgical Oncology
School of Medicine

Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences

Population Health Sciences
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

A.B. 2001

Harvard University

M.A. 2001

Harvard University

M.D. 2007

Washington University School of Medicine

M.P.H.S. 2011

Washington University School of Medicine

General Surgery Resident, Surgery

Washington University School of Medicine

Breast Surgical Oncology Fellow, Surgery

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Grants:

A Trial of Endocrine Response in Women with Invasive Lobular Breast Cancer

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
University of Pittsburgh
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Does treatment sequence affect outcomes in patients with metaplastic breast cancer?

Introduction: We compared characteristics and outcomes by treatment sequence among patients with metaplastic breast cancer (MBC), an aggressive subtype. Methods: Women ≥18 years old with newly diagnosed Stage I-III MBC from 2003 to 2018 who received any treatment in our health system were identified. Unadjusted overall survival (OS) was estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method; the log-rank test was used to compare survival differences between recipients of neoadjuvant (NACT) and adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT). Results: Of the 91 MBC patients identified, 60 received chemotherapy. NACT recipients (n = 20, median age 46.5 y) were younger than ACT recipients (n = 40, median age 60.5 y, p < 0.001) but similar with regards to race and radiation receipt. There was no significant OS difference between NACT and ACT recipients (log-rank p = 0.15), which remained true when patients were stratified by age (≥50 y vs < 50 y). Conclusions: Among MBC patients, NACT recipients were younger than ACT recipients, but there was no survival difference by treatment sequence.
Authors
Ladipo, OL; Ren, Y; Caddell, KB; Sampathkumar, A; Almond, CA; Fayanju, OM
MLA Citation
Ladipo, O. L., et al. “Does treatment sequence affect outcomes in patients with metaplastic breast cancer?American Journal of Surgery, Jan. 2021. Scopus, doi:10.1016/j.amjsurg.2021.01.007.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1473160
Source
scopus
Published In
American Journal of Surgery
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.amjsurg.2021.01.007

Oncologic Outcomes After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Postmastectomy Breast Reconstruction.

MLA Citation
Fayanju, Oluwadamilola M., et al. “Oncologic Outcomes After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Postmastectomy Breast Reconstruction.Jama Surg, vol. 155, no. 12, Dec. 2020, pp. 1150–51. Pubmed, doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2020.4138.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1463092
PMID
33052373
Source
pubmed
Published In
Jama Surg
Volume
155
Published Date
Start Page
1150
End Page
1151
DOI
10.1001/jamasurg.2020.4138

The effect of body mass index (BMI) on survival in patients with breast cancer and obesity-associated conditions.

Authors
Caddell, KB; Ren, Y; Sampathkumar, A; Almond, CA; Ladipo, OL; Champ, CE; Rosenberger, LH; Greenup, RA; Plichta, JK; DiLalla, G; Menendez, CS; Tolnitch, L; Hwang, E-SS; Hyslop, T; Fayanju, OM
MLA Citation
Caddell, Keenan B., et al. “The effect of body mass index (BMI) on survival in patients with breast cancer and obesity-associated conditions.Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 38, no. 29, 2020.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1473540
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
38
Published Date

Disparities at the Intersection of Race and Ethnicity: Examining Trends and Outcomes in Hispanic Women With Breast Cancer.

PURPOSE: We sought to examine tumor subtype, stage at diagnosis, time to surgery (TTS), and overall survival (OS) among Hispanic patients of different races and among Hispanic and non-Hispanic (NH) women of the same race. METHODS: Women 18 years of age or older who had been diagnosed with stage 0-IV breast cancer and who had undergone lumpectomy or mastectomy were identified in the National Cancer Database (2004-2014). Tumor subtype and stage at diagnosis were compared by race/ethnicity. Multivariable linear regression and Cox proportional hazards modeling were used to estimate associations between race/ethnicity and adjusted TTS and OS, respectively. RESULTS: A total of 44,374 Hispanic (American Indian [AI]: 79 [0.2%]; Black: 1,011 [2.3%]; White: 41,126 [92.7%]; Other: 2,158 [4.9%]) and 858,634 NH women (AI: 2,319 [0.3%]; Black: 97,206 [11.3%]; White: 727,270 [84.7%]; Other: 31,839 [3.7%]) were included. Hispanic Black women had lower rates of triple-negative disease (16.2%) than did NH Black women (23.5%) but higher rates than did Hispanic White women (13.9%; P < .001). Hispanic White women had higher rates of node-positive disease (23.2%) versus NH White women (14.4%) but slightly lower rates than Hispanic (24.6%) and NH Black women (24.5%; P < .001). Hispanic White women had longer TTS versus NH White women regardless of treatment sequence (adjusted means: adjuvant chemotherapy, 42.71 v 38.60 days; neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 208.55 v 201.14 days; both P < .001), but there were no significant racial differences in TTS among Hispanic patients. After adjustment, Hispanic White women (hazard ratio, 0.77 [95% CI, 0.74 to 0.81]) and Black women (hazard ratio, 0.75 [95% CI, 0.58 to 0.96]) had improved OS versus NH White women (reference) and Black women (hazard ratio, 1.15 [95% CI, 1.12 to 1.18]; all P < .05). CONCLUSION: Hispanic women had improved OS versus NH women, but racial differences in tumor subtype and nodal stage among Hispanic women highlight the importance of disaggregating racial/ethnic data in breast cancer research.
Authors
Champion, CD; Thomas, SM; Plichta, JK; Parrilla Castellar, E; Rosenberger, LH; Greenup, RA; Hyslop, T; Hwang, ES; Fayanju, OM
MLA Citation
Champion, Cosette D., et al. “Disparities at the Intersection of Race and Ethnicity: Examining Trends and Outcomes in Hispanic Women With Breast Cancer.Jco Oncol Pract, Oct. 2020, p. OP2000381. Pubmed, doi:10.1200/OP.20.00381.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1462132
PMID
33026950
Source
pubmed
Published In
Jco Oncol Pract
Published Date
Start Page
OP2000381
DOI
10.1200/OP.20.00381

Characterizing participants in the North Carolina Breast and Cervical Cancer Control Program: A retrospective review of 90,000 women.

BACKGROUND: The North Carolina Breast and Cervical Cancer Control Program (NC BCCCP) provides breast cancer screening services to underserved women to mitigate disparities in access to care. The authors sought to characterize this understudied population. METHODS: Women 21 years old or older who underwent their first breast cancer screen through NC BCCCP from 2008 to 2018 were included. Demographic factors associated with the timeline of care and odds of a breast cancer diagnosis were identified with negative binomial and logistic regression, respectively. RESULTS: Of the 88,893 women identified, 45.5% were non-Hispanic (NH) White, 30.9% were NH Black, 19.6% were Hispanic, 1.7% were American Indian, and 1.1% were Asian. Breast cancer was diagnosed in 2.5% of the women (n = 2255). Hispanic women were the least likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer (odds ratio vs NH White women, 0.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.34-0.47). Among patients with breast pathology, the median time to diagnosis was 19 days (interquartile range [IQR], 10-33 days), and the time to treatment was 33 days (IQR, 19-54 days). After adjustments, a longer time to diagnosis was significantly associated with age (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 1.01; 95% CI, 1.01-1.02) and being NH Black (vs NH White; IRR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.06-1.29). A longer time to treatment was significantly associated with age (IRR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.01-1.01), being NH Black (vs NH White; IRR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.10-1.31), and being Hispanic (vs NH White; IRR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.05-1.41). CONCLUSIONS: NC BCCCP participants with breast cancer received treatment within approximately 1 month of presentation, and this finding aligns with quality care benchmarks. Nevertheless, racial/ethnic disparities in timeliness of care persist, and this suggests opportunities for improvement. LAY SUMMARY: This review of approximately 90,000 participants in a breast cancer screening program for uninsured and underinsured women highlights the importance of safety net programs in providing timely care to underserved patients. The authors found that the North Carolina Breast and Cervical Cancer Control Program met timeliness benchmarks from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention across all racial/ethnic groups. However, non-Hispanic Black women experienced relative delays in the time to diagnosis, and both non-Hispanic Black women and Hispanic women experienced relative delays in the time to treatment. These findings demonstrate how racial/ethnic disparities in the timeliness of care can persist even within a program intended to reduce barriers to access.
Authors
Tait, SD; Ren, Y; Horton, CC; Oshima, SM; Thomas, SM; Wright, S; Caesar, A; Plichta, JK; Hwang, ES; Greenup, RA; Rosenberger, LH; DiLalla, GD; Menendez, CS; Tolnitch, L; Hyslop, T; Nelson, D; Fayanju, OM
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1473539
PMID
33826758
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Published Date
DOI
10.1002/cncr.33473