Oluwadamilola Fayanju

Overview:

Dr. Fayanju is an Assistant Professor of Surgery and Population Health Sciences in the Duke University School of Medicine, Associate Director for Disparities & Value in Healthcare with Duke Forge (the university’s center for actionable data science: https://forge.duke.edu/oluwadamilola-fayanju-md-ma-mphs), and Director of the Durham VA Breast Clinic.

She received her undergraduate degree in History and Science and an MA in Comparative Literature from Harvard. She received her MD and a master of population health sciences (MPHS) from Washington University in St. Louis, where she also completed her residency in General Surgery. She completed fellowship training in Breast Surgical Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Her research, which is supported by an NIH K08 career development award, has 3 areas of focus: (1) addressing disparities in breast cancer presentation, treatment, outcome, and clinical trial participation; (2) improving prognostication and treatment for biologically aggressive variants of breast cancer that are often more common among racial and ethnic minorities; and (3) creating value in oncologic care, especially through the collection and application of patient-reported outcomes.

She is active in several national organizations, currently serving on the Board of Directors for the Surgical Outcomes Club and on various committees including the Breast, Cancer Care Delivery, and Health Disparities Committees for the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology; the Patient-reported Outcomes, Patient Safety and Quality, and Publications Committees for the American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBrS); the Nominating and Program Committees for the Association for Academic Surgery (AAS); the Women in Surgery Committee for the Society of Black Academic Surgeons (SBAS); and the Locoregional and Patient-reported Outcomes Committees for the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC).

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Surgery

Surgical Oncology
School of Medicine

Assistant Professor in Population Health Sciences

Population Health Sciences
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

A.B. 2001

Harvard University

M.A. 2001

Harvard University

M.D. 2007

Washington University School of Medicine

M.P.H.S. 2011

Washington University School of Medicine

General Surgery Resident, Surgery

Washington University School of Medicine

Breast Surgical Oncology Fellow, Surgery

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Grants:

Publications:

Surgery for Men with Breast Cancer: Do the Same Data Still Apply?

BACKGROUND: Men represent a small proportion of breast cancer diagnoses, and they are often excluded from clinical trials. Current treatments are largely extrapolated from evidence in women. We compare practice patterns between men and women with breast cancer following the publication of several landmark clinical trials in surgery. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with invasive breast cancer (2004-2015) from the National Cancer Data Base were identified; subcohorts were created based on eligibility for NSABP-B06, CALGB 9343, and ACOSOG Z0011. Practice patterns were stratified by gender and compared. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were utilized to estimate the association between OS and gender. RESULTS: Of the 1,664,746 patients identified, 99% were women and 1% were men. Among NSABP-B06 eligible men, mastectomy rates did not change (consistently ~ 80%), and their adjusted OS was minimally worse compared with women (HR 1.19, 95% CI 1.11-1.28). Following publication of CALGB 9343, omission of radiation after lumpectomy was less likely in men and lagged behind that of women, despite similar OS (male HR 0.92, 95% CI 0.59-1.44). Application of ACOSOG Z0011 findings resulted in deescalation of axillary surgery for men and women with comparable OS (male HR 0.69, 95% CI 0.33-1.45). CONCLUSIONS: Uptake of clinical trial results for men with breast cancer often mirrors that for women, despite exclusion from these studies. Furthermore, when study findings were applied to eligible patients, men and women demonstrated similar survival. Observational studies can help inform the potential application of study findings to this unique population and improve patient enrollment in clinical trials.
Authors
MLA Citation
Plichta, Jennifer K., et al. “Surgery for Men with Breast Cancer: Do the Same Data Still Apply?Ann Surg Oncol, July 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.1245/s10434-020-08901-z.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1452159
PMID
32705510
Source
pubmed
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Published Date
DOI
10.1245/s10434-020-08901-z

A Call to Action: Black/African American Women Surgeon Scientists, Where are They?

OBJECTIVE:To determine the representation of Black/AA women surgeons in academic medicine among U.S. medical school faculty and to assess the number of NIH grants awarded to Black/AA women surgeon-scientists over the past 2 decades. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA:Despite increasing ethnic/racial and sex diversity in U.S. medical schools and residencies, Black/AA women have historically been underrepresented in academic surgery. METHODS:A retrospective review of the Association of American Medical Colleges 2017 Faculty Roster was performed and the number of grants awarded to surgeons from the NIH (1998-2017) was obtained. Data from the Association of American Medical Colleges included the total number of medical school surgery faculty, academic rank, tenure status, and department Chair roles. Descriptive statistics were performed. RESULTS:Of the 15,671 U.S. medical school surgical faculty, 123 (0.79%) were Black/AA women surgeons with only 11 (0.54%) being tenured faculty. When stratified by academic rank, 15 (12%) Black/AA women surgeons were instructors, 73 (59%) were assistant professors, 19 (15%) were associate professors, and 10 (8%) were full professors of surgery. Of the 372 U.S. department Chairs of surgery, none were Black/AA women. Of the 9139 NIH grants awarded to academic surgeons from 1998 and 2017, 31 (0.34%) grants were awarded to fewer than 12 Black/AA women surgeons. CONCLUSION:A significant disparity in the number of Black/AA women in academic surgery exists with few attaining promotion to the rank of professor with tenure and none ascending to the role of department Chair of surgery. Identifying and removing structural barriers to promotion, NIH grant funding, and academic advancement of Black/AA women as leaders and surgeon-scientists is needed.
Authors
Berry, C; Khabele, D; Johnson-Mann, C; Henry-Tillman, R; Joseph, K-A; Turner, P; Pugh, C; Fayanju, OM; Backhus, L; Sweeting, R; Newman, EA; Oseni, T; Hasson, RM; White, C; Cobb, A; Johnston, FM; Stallion, A; Karpeh, M; Nwariaku, F; Rodriguez, LM; Jordan, AH
MLA Citation
Berry, Cherisse, et al. “A Call to Action: Black/African American Women Surgeon Scientists, Where are They?Annals of Surgery, vol. 272, no. 1, July 2020, pp. 24–29. Epmc, doi:10.1097/sla.0000000000003786.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1436015
PMID
32209893
Source
epmc
Published In
Annals of Surgery
Volume
272
Published Date
Start Page
24
End Page
29
DOI
10.1097/sla.0000000000003786

Do Histopathology and Clinical Outcomes of Breast Atypia Vary by Race/Ethnicity?

BACKGROUND: The clinical behavior of breast cancer varies by racial and ethnic makeup (REM), but the impact of REM on the clinical outcomes of breast atypia remains understudied. We examined the impact of REM on risk of underlying or subsequent carcinoma following a diagnosis of breast atypia. METHODS: In this retrospective, single-institution chart review, adult women diagnosed with breast atypia (atypical ductal hyperplasia, atypical lobular hyperplasia, or lobular carcinoma in situ) were stratified by REM. Regression modeling was used to estimate risk of underlying or subsequent carcinoma. RESULTS: We identified 539 patients with breast atypia, including 15 Hispanic (2.8%), 127 non-Hispanic black (23.6%), and 397 non-Hispanic white women (73.7%). Diagnoses included 75.1% atypical ductal hyperplasia (n = 405), 4.6% atypical lobular hyperplasia (n = 25), and 20.2% lobular carcinoma in situ (n = 109). Rates for each type of atypia did not vary by REM (P = 0.33). Of those with atypia on needle biopsy, the rate of underlying carcinoma at excision was 17.3%. After adjustment, REM was not associated with greater risk for carcinoma at excision (P = 0.41). Of those with atypia alone on surgical excision, the rate of a subsequent carcinoma diagnosis was 15.4% (median follow-up 49 mo). REM was not associated with a long-term risk for carcinoma (P = 0.37) or differences in time to subsequent carcinoma (log-rank P = 0.52). Chemoprevention uptake rates were low (10.6%), especially among Hispanic (0%) and non-Hispanic black (3.8%) patients (P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with atypia, REM does not appear to influence type of histologic atypia, risk for carcinoma, or clinical outcome, despite differences in chemoprevention rates.
Authors
Sergesketter, AR; Thomas, SM; Parrilla Castellar, ER; Fayanju, OM; Menendez, C; Hwang, ES; Plichta, JK
MLA Citation
Sergesketter, Amanda R., et al. “Do Histopathology and Clinical Outcomes of Breast Atypia Vary by Race/Ethnicity?J Surg Res, vol. 255, June 2020, pp. 205–15. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jss.2020.05.066.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1448058
PMID
32563761
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Surg Res
Volume
255
Published Date
Start Page
205
End Page
215
DOI
10.1016/j.jss.2020.05.066

Surgical Management of the Axilla in Elderly Women With Node-positive Breast Cancer.

BACKGROUND: Elderly women with clinically node-positive (cN+) breast cancer (BC) often have comorbidities that limit life expectancy and complicate treatment. We sought to determine whether the number of lymph nodes (LNs) retrieved among older women with node-positive BC was associated with overall survival (OS). METHODS: Using the National Cancer Database (2010-2015), women 70-90 y with cN + BC and ≥1 LNs removed were categorized by treatment sequence: upfront surgery or neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models with restricted cubic splines characterized the functional association of LN retrieval with OS; threshold values of LN retrieval were estimated. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the association of LN retrieval groups with OS. RESULTS: In the upfront surgery cohort, a nonlinear association was identified between LNs retrieved and OS. In the NAC cohort, no association was identified. For the upfront surgery cohort, the optimal threshold value of LN retrieval was 21 LNs (90% confidence interval 18-23). Based on this estimate, LN retrieval groups were created: <6, 6-11, 12-17, 18-23, and >23 LNs. After adjustment, retrieval of <12 LNs in the upfront surgery group was associated with a worse OS. No differences were observed in the NAC group. CONCLUSIONS: For elderly women receiving upfront surgery, there is no survival benefit to removing more than 12 LNs, and for those receiving NAC, there is no association between number of LNs removed and survival. In older women who present with cN + BC, aggressive surgery to remove more than 12 LNs may not be necessary.
Authors
Marks, CE; Ren, Y; Rosenberger, LH; Thomas, SM; Greenup, RA; Fayanju, OM; McDuff, S; Kimmick, G; Shelley Hwang, E; Plichta, JK
MLA Citation
Marks, Caitlin E., et al. “Surgical Management of the Axilla in Elderly Women With Node-positive Breast Cancer.J Surg Res, vol. 254, May 2020, pp. 275–85. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jss.2020.04.036.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1446657
PMID
32480072
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Surg Res
Volume
254
Published Date
Start Page
275
End Page
285
DOI
10.1016/j.jss.2020.04.036

Abstract P3-08-10: Characterization of oncotype DX recurrence score and chemotherapy utilization patterns in young women (≤40) with early stage ER+/HER-, lymph node negative breast cancer

MLA Citation
Sammons, Sarah, et al. “Abstract P3-08-10: Characterization of oncotype DX recurrence score and chemotherapy utilization patterns in young women (≤40) with early stage ER+/HER-, lymph node negative breast cancer.” Poster Session Abstracts, American Association for Cancer Research, 2020. Crossref, doi:10.1158/1538-7445.sabcs19-p3-08-10.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1442733
Source
crossref
Published In
Poster Session Abstracts
Published Date
DOI
10.1158/1538-7445.sabcs19-p3-08-10