Peter Fecci

Overview:

As the Director of both the Brain Tumor Immunotherapy Program and the Center for Brain and Spine Metastasis at Duke University, I focus our programmatic interests on the design, optimization, and monitoring of immune-based treatment platforms for patients with intracranial tumors, whether primary or metastatic. Within this broad scope, however, my own group looks more specifically at limitations to immunotherapeutic success, with a particular focus on understanding and reversing T cell dysfunction in patients with glioblastoma (GBM) and brain metastases. We employ a systematic approach to categorizing T cell dysfunction (Woroniecka et al, Clin Cancer Res 2018 Aug 15;24(16):3792-3802), and whereas our earlier work addressed concerns for regulatory T cell-induced tolerance, we now heavily study T cell ignorance and exhaustion, as well. Regarding the former, we recently published the novel phenomenon of S1P1-mediated bone marrow T cell sequestration in patients with intracranial tumors (Chongsathidkiet et al, Nat Medicine 2018 Sep;24(9):1459-1468). Regarding the latter, we have likewise recently identified and characterized exhaustion as a significant limitation to T-cell function within GBM (Woroniecka et al, Clin Cancer Res 2018 Sep 1;24(17):4175-4186). I very much look to collaboratively integrate our approaches with others investigating innovative treatment options. I continue my focus on combining strategies for reversing T cell deficits with current and novel immune-based platforms as a means of deriving and improving rational and precise anti-tumor therapies. It is my sincerest desire to forge a career focused on co-operative, multi-disciplinary, organized brain tumor therapy. Ultimately, my goal is to help coordinate the efforts of a streamlined and effective center for brain tumor research and clinical care. I hope to play some role in ushering in a period where the science and treatment arms of brain tumor therapy suffer no disjoint, but instead represent the convergent efforts of researchers, neuro-oncologists, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, biomedical engineers, and neurosurgeons alike. I hope to see such synergy become standard of care.

Positions:

Associate Professor of Neurosurgery

Neurosurgery
School of Medicine

Assistant Research Professor in Immunology

Immunology
School of Medicine

Associate Professor in Pathology

Pathology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2007

Duke University School of Medicine

Ph.D. 2007

Duke University

Internship, General Surgery

Massachusetts General Hospital

Residency, Neurosurgery

Massachusetts General Hospital

Postdoctoral Fellow

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Instructor, Neurosurgery

Massachusetts General Hospital

Grants:

Laser Ablation of Abnormal Neurolgoical Tissue using Robotic Neuroblate System (LAANTERN) Prospective Registry

Administered By
Neurosurgery
Awarded By
Monteris Medical, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

NINDS Research Education Programs for Residents and Fellows in Neurosurgery

Administered By
Neurosurgery
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

LITT and Short Course Radiation for Patients with GBM Requiring Standard Treatment Alternatives (LASR)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Monteris Medical, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Directed Chemotherapy Delivery for Leptomeningeal Metastases

Administered By
Neurosurgery
Awarded By
Minnetronix, Inc
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Validation of Novel Therapeutic Approach for Leptomeningeal Metastases

Administered By
Neurosurgery
Awarded By
Minnetronix, Inc
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy Followed By SRS Increases Time to Progression of Recurrent Brain Metastases Initially Treated With SRS

Authors
Grabowski, MM; Sankey, E; Srinivasan, E; Howell, E; Scott, A; Olufawo, M; Otvos, B; Kim, A; Barnett, G; Leuthardt, E; Mohammadi, A; Fecci, P
MLA Citation
Grabowski, Matthew M., et al. “Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy Followed By SRS Increases Time to Progression of Recurrent Brain Metastases Initially Treated With SRS.” Journal of Neurosurgery, vol. 132, no. 4, AMER ASSOC NEUROLOGICAL SURGEONS, 2020, pp. 111–111.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1437925
Source
wos
Published In
Journal of Neurosurgery
Volume
132
Published Date
Start Page
111
End Page
111

Bone Marrow T-Cell Sequestration and Lymphopenia Accompanying Ischemic Stroke are Mediated by T-Cell S1P1 Loss

Authors
Chongsathidkiet, P; Dechant, C; Wilkinson, D; Wang, H; Kemeny, H; Cui, X; Lorrey, S; Laskowitz, DT; Fecci, PE
MLA Citation
Chongsathidkiet, Pakawat, et al. “Bone Marrow T-Cell Sequestration and Lymphopenia Accompanying Ischemic Stroke are Mediated by T-Cell S1P1 Loss.” Neurosurgery, vol. 66, 2019, pp. 51–52.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1447809
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Neurosurgery
Volume
66
Published Date
Start Page
51
End Page
52

304 Safety of Laser Ablation for Brain Tumors: Preliminary Results From the Laser Ablation of Abnormal Neurological Tissue Using Robotic NeuroBlate System (LAANTERN) Registry

Authors
Kamath, AA; Kim, AH; Chen, CC; Tatter, SB; Fecci, P; Toyota, B; Chiang, V; Mohammadi, AM; Rao, G; Judy, KD; Field, M; Sloan, AE; Neimat, JS; Leuthardt, EC
MLA Citation
Kamath, Ashwin A., et al. “304 Safety of Laser Ablation for Brain Tumors: Preliminary Results From the Laser Ablation of Abnormal Neurological Tissue Using Robotic NeuroBlate System (LAANTERN) Registry.” Neurosurgery, vol. 65, no. CN_suppl_1, Oxford University Press (OUP), 2018, pp. 123–24. Crossref, doi:10.1093/neuros/nyy303.304.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1434267
Source
crossref
Published In
Neurosurgery
Volume
65
Published Date
Start Page
123
End Page
124
DOI
10.1093/neuros/nyy303.304

301 Antitumor Efficacy of Anti-PDL-1 In ACTH-Secreting Pituitary Adenomas: A Novel Immunotherapeutic Approach for Cushing's Disease

Authors
Kemeny, H; Elsamadicy, AA; Farber, SH; Chongsathidkiet, P; Dechant, C; Shen, S; Dunn, IF; Fecci, PE
MLA Citation
Kemeny, Hanna, et al. “301 Antitumor Efficacy of Anti-PDL-1 In ACTH-Secreting Pituitary Adenomas: A Novel Immunotherapeutic Approach for Cushing's Disease.” Neurosurgery, vol. 65, no. CN_suppl_1, Oxford University Press (OUP), 2018, pp. 122–23. Crossref, doi:10.1093/neuros/nyy303.301.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1434268
Source
crossref
Published In
Neurosurgery
Volume
65
Published Date
Start Page
122
End Page
123
DOI
10.1093/neuros/nyy303.301

Nanostar probes: A golden platform for Synergistic Immuno Photothermal Nanotherapy (SYMPHONY) for the treatment of metastatic cancer

© 2020 SPIE. The discovery of new treatments for cancer is imperative. Recently, we showed in a proof-of-concept study that SYnergistic IMmuno PHOtothermal NanotherapY (SYMPHONY) is a powerful treatment for metastatic bladder cancer and brain tumor in mouse models. Our work has recently demonstrated that combining immunotherapy checkpoint inhibitors and gold nanostar (AuNS) photothermal therapy (PTT) is more effective in killing primary tumors and activating the immune system to eradicate tumors at distant sites, than each individual treatment alone. When the tumor is being ablated via PTT in mice models, using low intensity heat from a near infrared laser, the dying tumor releases proteins that trigger the immune system to destroy remaining tumor cells. Immune checkpoint inhibitors prevent the tumor cells from hiding from the immune system's mechanisms; thus, the immune system becomes capable of attacking distant secondary tumors, after the primary tumor has been eradicated using AuNS mediated PTT. The data shows that after the cured mice were rechallenged with bladder cancer cells, no tumor formation was observed after 60 days; hence these results indicate that the SYMPHONY treatment can function as a cancer vaccine and lead to long-lasting immunity.
Authors
Cupil-Garcia, V; Liu, Y; Crawford, BM; Chongsathidkiet, P; Palmer, G; Maccarini, P; Fecci, PE; Inman, B; Vo-Dinh, T
MLA Citation
Cupil-Garcia, V., et al. “Nanostar probes: A golden platform for Synergistic Immuno Photothermal Nanotherapy (SYMPHONY) for the treatment of metastatic cancer.” Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging  Proceedings of Spie, vol. 11257, 2020. Scopus, doi:10.1117/12.2552995.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1447096
Source
scopus
Published In
Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging Proceedings of Spie
Volume
11257
Published Date
DOI
10.1117/12.2552995

Research Areas:

Blood-Brain Barrier
Brain metastasis
Cancer
Glioma
Glioma, Subependymal
Immunotherapy
Immunotherapy, Active
T cells
T cells--Effect of drugs on
T cells--Receptors
Translational Medical Research