Laura Fish

Positions:

Assistant Professor in Family Medicine and Community Health

Family Medicine and Community Health, Prevention Research
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.P.H. 1992

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Ph.D. 2006

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Grants:

IPA - Laura Jane Fish

Administered By
Family Medicine and Community Health
Awarded By
Veterans Administration Medical Center
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

IPA-Laura Fish

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Veterans Administration Medical Center
Role
Clinical Research Manager
Start Date
End Date

Evaluating fitness-for-use of Electronic Health Records in Clinical Research

Administered By
Duke Clinical Research Institute
Awarded By
Food and Drug Administration
Role
Interviewer
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Cost of Reconstruction: A Qualitative Study of Women after Breast Cancer

Authors
Lane, WO; Rushing, C; Mundy, LR; Shammas, R; Hollenbeck, ST; Fish, LJ; Greenup, RA
MLA Citation
Lane, Whitney O., et al. “Cost of Reconstruction: A Qualitative Study of Women after Breast Cancer.” Journal of the American College of Surgeons, vol. 229, no. 4, ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2019, pp. S147–S147.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1421710
Source
wos
Published In
Journal of the American College of Surgeons
Volume
229
Published Date
Start Page
S147
End Page
S147

Efficacy of a Texting Program to Promote Cessation Among Pregnant Smokers: A Randomized Control Trial.

INTRODUCTION: Smoking during pregnancy poses serious risks to baby and mother. Few disseminable programs exist to help pregnant women quit or reduce their smoking. We hypothesized that an SMS text-delivered scheduled gradual reduction (SGR) program plus support texts would outperform SMS support messages alone. METHODS: We recruited 314 pregnant women from 14 prenatal clinics. Half of the women received theory-based support messages throughout their pregnancy to promote cessation and prevent relapse. The other half received the support messages plus alert texts that gradually reduced their smoking more than 3-5 weeks. We conducted surveys at baseline, end of pregnancy, and 3 months postpartum. Our primary outcome was biochemically validated 7-day point prevalence abstinence at late pregnancy. Our secondary outcome was reduction in cigarettes per day. RESULTS: Adherence to the SGR was adequate with 70% responding to alert texts to smoke within 60 minutes. Women in both arms quit smoking at the same rate (9%-12%). Women also significantly reduced their smoking from baseline to the end of pregnancy from nine cigarettes to four; we found no arm differences in reduction. CONCLUSIONS: Support text messages alone produced significant quit rates above naturally occurring quitting. SGR did not add significantly to helping women quit or reduce. Sending support messages can reach many women and is low-cost. More obstetric providers might consider having patients who smoke sign up for free texting programs to help them quit. IMPLICATIONS: A disseminable texting program helped some pregnant women quit smoking.Clinical Trial Registration number: NCT01995097.
Authors
Pollak, KI; Lyna, P; Gao, X; Noonan, D; Bejarano Hernandez, S; Subudhi, S; Swamy, GK; Fish, LJ
MLA Citation
Pollak, Kathryn I., et al. “Efficacy of a Texting Program to Promote Cessation Among Pregnant Smokers: A Randomized Control Trial..” Nicotine Tob Res, Sept. 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/ntr/ntz174.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1417045
PMID
31647564
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nicotine Tob Res
Published Date
DOI
10.1093/ntr/ntz174

EFFICACY OF A SMS INTERVENTION TO PROMOTE SMOKING CESSATION VIA SCHEDULED GRADUAL REDUCTION AMONG PREGNANT WOMEN

Authors
Pollak, K; Lyna, P; Gao, X; Hernandez, SB; Subudhi, S; Swamy, G; Fish, LJ
MLA Citation
Pollak, Kathryn, et al. “EFFICACY OF A SMS INTERVENTION TO PROMOTE SMOKING CESSATION VIA SCHEDULED GRADUAL REDUCTION AMONG PREGNANT WOMEN.” Annals of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 53, OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC, 2019, pp. S837–S837.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1398416
Source
wos
Published In
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume
53
Published Date
Start Page
S837
End Page
S837

Advancement of multidisciplinary education and research in translational sciences: MERITS program development at Duke University.

Introduction: The Duke Multidisciplinary Education and Research in Translational Sciences Program provides educational resources for faculty and trainees in translational research. Methods: To aid in program development, we assessed perceptions of translational science through focus groups targeting different career stages. Results: In total, 3 essential themes emerged: collaboration, movement toward application, and public health impact. Facilitators and barriers varied among groups. Conclusion: Training programs must provide specific strategies for collaboration and selectively accelerating discoveries to therapies.
Authors
Freel, SA; Fish, LJ; Mirman, B; Sudan, R; Devi, GR
MLA Citation
Freel, Stephanie A., et al. “Advancement of multidisciplinary education and research in translational sciences: MERITS program development at Duke University..” J Clin Transl Sci, vol. 2, no. 1, Feb. 2018, pp. 57–62. Pubmed, doi:10.1017/cts.2018.17.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1417917
PMID
31660219
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Clinical and Translational Science
Volume
2
Published Date
Start Page
57
End Page
62
DOI
10.1017/cts.2018.17

Lack of utility of cigarettes per day cutoffs for clinical and laboratory smoking research.

BACKGROUND: Most clinical and laboratory smoking research studies require that participants smoke at a certain level to be eligible for enrollment. However, there is limited evidence that use of these cutoffs differentiates groups of smokers along clinically meaningful criteria. METHODS: Using receiver operating characteristic curves, we analyzed data from daily smokers in the National Epidemiologic Study of Alcohol Use and Related Conditions - III (NESARC-III) to examine the utility of smoking rates for determining whether participants met DSM-5 criteria for tobacco use disorder, experienced nicotine withdrawal or had a history of failed quit attempts. We also examined whether relationships between these variables differed as a function of key sample characteristics. RESULTS: Smoking rate exhibited a weak relationship with the presence of tobacco use disorder (AUC = 0.664), whether individuals experience nicotine withdrawal (AUC = 0.672) and whether individuals had a history of failed quit attempts (AUC = 0.578). The relationship between smoking rate and a history of failed quit attempts was weaker for women than men (p < .05). Otherwise, utility did not differ as a function of sex, race/ethnicity, education, income, or use of multiple tobacco products. Optimal cutoffs varied somewhat across indices, but the largest number of correct classifications occurred at very low smoking rates. CONCLUSIONS: Researchers should consider abandoning the use of smoking rate cutoffs to determine study eligibility. If smoking rate cutoffs are used, a rationale should be presented along with justification for the specific cutoff chosen.
Authors
Oliver, JA; Pacek, LR; Locey, EN; Fish, LM; Hendricks, PS; Pollak, KI
MLA Citation
Oliver, Jason A., et al. “Lack of utility of cigarettes per day cutoffs for clinical and laboratory smoking research..” Addict Behav, vol. 98, Nov. 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2019.106066.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1404136
PMID
31386967
Source
pubmed
Published In
Addict Behav
Volume
98
Published Date
Start Page
106066
DOI
10.1016/j.addbeh.2019.106066