Laura Fish

Positions:

Assistant Professor in Family Medicine and Community Health

Family Medicine and Community Health, Prevention Research
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.P.H. 1992

University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

Ph.D. 2006

University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

Grants:

IPA - Laura Jane Fish

Administered By
Family Medicine and Community Health
Awarded By
Veterans Administration Medical Center
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

IPA-Laura Fish

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Veterans Administration Medical Center
Role
Clinical Research Manager
Start Date
End Date

Implement SmokeFreeTXT eReferral Program into the Duke Smoking Cessation Program

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
ICF International, Inc.
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Evaluating fitness-for-use of Electronic Health Records in Clinical Research

Administered By
Duke Clinical Research Institute
Awarded By
Food and Drug Administration
Role
Interviewer
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Feasibility of a text-based reduction intervention in helping rural and underserved smokeless tobacco users quit.

INTRODUCTION: Smokeless tobacco (ST) use significantly affects morbidity and mortality and remains disproportionally prevalent in rural and medically underserved communities. Few programs exist for rural smokeless tobacco users. Text-based interventions may increase the reach of cessation interventions; yet, none has tested them in ST users. We evaluated the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of a text-based Scheduled Gradual Reduction (SGR) intervention in rural and underserved ST users. METHODS: ST users were randomized in 2:1 fashion to the SGR group (N = 65), a text-based reduction program plus text-based support counseling messages or text-based support messages only group (N = 33). We surveyed participants at 30-days post intervention initiation to assess feasibility and acceptability and examined self-report 7-day point prevalence cessation at 30-days and 6-months post intervention initiation in the two arms. RESULTS: We achieved benchmarks for feasibility and acceptability. Among the SGR participants 51% (n = 48) reported that intervention was useful in helping them quit, 83% (n = 48) indicated that they would recommend the intervention to a friend. Over 95% (n = 39) of SGR participants said that they read all alert texts. The SGR participants had a higher quit rate at 30-days compared to support messages alone (SGR = 21.5%, Control = 9.1%, p = 0.1627, Cohen's d equivalent = 0.56, medium effect). However, the quit rate at 6-months was 21% (p = 0.9703) for both groups. CONCLUSIONS: A text-based intervention was feasible and acceptable among underserved ST users. SGR helped promote short-term cessation. The text-based interventions both had long-term efficacy. Given that text-based interventions have the potential to increase reach in underserved ST users, further testing is warranted.
Authors
Noonan, D; Silva, S; Fish, LJ; Peter, K; Conley, C; Simmons, LA; Severson, H; Pollak, KI
MLA Citation
Noonan, Devon, et al. “Feasibility of a text-based reduction intervention in helping rural and underserved smokeless tobacco users quit.Addict Behav, vol. 108, Sept. 2020, p. 106434. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2020.106434.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1439854
PMID
32361367
Source
pubmed
Published In
Addict Behav
Volume
108
Published Date
Start Page
106434
DOI
10.1016/j.addbeh.2020.106434

Factors associated with biomedical research participation within community-based samples across 3 National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers.

BACKGROUND: Engaging diverse populations in biomedical research, including biospecimen donation, remains a national challenge. This study examined factors associated with an invitation to participate in biomedical research, intent to participate in biomedical research in the future, and participation in biomedical research and biospecimen donation among a diverse, multilingual, community-based sample across 3 distinct geographic areas. METHODS: Three National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers engaged in community partnerships to develop and implement population health assessments, reaching a convenience sample of 4343 participants spanning their respective catchment areas. Data harmonization, multiple imputation, and multivariable logistic modeling were used. RESULTS: African Americans, Hispanic/Latinos, and other racial minority groups were more likely to be offered opportunities to participate in biomedical research compared to whites. Access to care, history of cancer, educational level, survey language, nativity, and rural residence also influenced opportunity, intent, and actual participation in biomedical research. CONCLUSIONS: Traditionally underserved racial and ethnic groups reported heightened opportunity and interest in participating in biomedical research. Well-established community partnerships and long-standing community engagement around biomedical research led to a diverse sample being reached at each site and may in part explain the current study findings. However, this study illustrates an ongoing need to establish trust and diversify biomedical research participation through innovative and tailored approaches. National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers have the potential to increase opportunities for diverse participation in biomedical research through community partnerships and engagement. Additional work remains to identify and address system-level and individual-level barriers to participation in both clinical trials and biospecimen donation for research.
Authors
Barrett, NJ; Rodriguez, EM; Iachan, R; Hyslop, T; Ingraham, KL; Le, GM; Martin, K; Haring, RC; Rivadeneira, NA; Erwin, DO; Fish, LJ; Middleton, D; Hiatt, RA; Patierno, SR; Sarkar, U; Gage-Bouchard, EA
MLA Citation
Barrett, Nadine J., et al. “Factors associated with biomedical research participation within community-based samples across 3 National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers.Cancer, vol. 126, no. 5, Mar. 2020, pp. 1077–89. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cncr.32487.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1426848
PMID
31909824
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Volume
126
Published Date
Start Page
1077
End Page
1089
DOI
10.1002/cncr.32487

Project PLACE: Enhancing community and academic partnerships to describe and address health disparities.

Achieving cancer health equity is a national imperative. Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States and in North Carolina (NC), where the disease disproportionately impacts traditionally underrepresented race and ethnic groups, those who live in rural communities, the impoverished, and medically disenfranchised and/or health-disparate populations at high-risk for cancer. These populations have worse cancer outcomes and are less likely to be participants in clinical research and trials. It is critical for cancer centers and other academic health centers to understand the factors that contribute to poor cancer outcomes, the extent to which they impact the cancer burden, and develop effective interventions to address them. Key to this process is engaging diverse stakeholders in the development and execution of community and population health assessments, and the subsequent programs and interventions designed to address the need across the catchment area. This chapter describes the processes and lessons learned of the Duke Cancer Institute's (DCI) long standing community partnerships that led to Project PLACE (Population Level Approaches to Cancer Elimination), a National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded community health assessment reaching 2315 respondents in 7 months, resulting in a community partnered research agenda to advance cancer equity within the DCI catchment area. We illustrate the application of a community partnered health assessment and offer examples of strategic opportunities, successes, lessons learned, and implications for practice.
Authors
Barrett, NJ; Ingraham, KL; Bethea, K; Hwa-Lin, P; Chirinos, M; Fish, LJ; Randolph, S; Zhang, P; Le, P; Harvey, D; Godbee, RL; Patierno, SR
MLA Citation
Barrett, Nadine J., et al. Project PLACE: Enhancing community and academic partnerships to describe and address health disparities. Vol. 146, 2020, pp. 167–88. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/bs.acr.2020.01.009.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1436736
PMID
32241388
Source
pubmed
Volume
146
Published Date
Start Page
167
End Page
188
DOI
10.1016/bs.acr.2020.01.009

Advancement of multidisciplinary education and research in translational sciences: MERITS program development at Duke University.

Introduction: The Duke Multidisciplinary Education and Research in Translational Sciences Program provides educational resources for faculty and trainees in translational research. Methods: To aid in program development, we assessed perceptions of translational science through focus groups targeting different career stages. Results: In total, 3 essential themes emerged: collaboration, movement toward application, and public health impact. Facilitators and barriers varied among groups. Conclusion: Training programs must provide specific strategies for collaboration and selectively accelerating discoveries to therapies.
Authors
Freel, SA; Fish, LJ; Mirman, B; Sudan, R; Devi, GR
MLA Citation
Freel, Stephanie A., et al. “Advancement of multidisciplinary education and research in translational sciences: MERITS program development at Duke University.J Clin Transl Sci, vol. 2, no. 1, Feb. 2018, pp. 57–62. Pubmed, doi:10.1017/cts.2018.17.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1417917
PMID
31660219
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Clinical and Translational Science
Volume
2
Published Date
Start Page
57
End Page
62
DOI
10.1017/cts.2018.17

Efficacy of a Texting Program to Promote Cessation Among Pregnant Smokers: A Randomized Control Trial.

INTRODUCTION: Smoking during pregnancy poses serious risks to baby and mother. Few disseminable programs exist to help pregnant women quit or reduce their smoking. We hypothesized that an SMS text-delivered scheduled gradual reduction (SGR) program plus support texts would outperform SMS support messages alone. METHODS: We recruited 314 pregnant women from 14 prenatal clinics. Half of the women received theory-based support messages throughout their pregnancy to promote cessation and prevent relapse. The other half received the support messages plus alert texts that gradually reduced their smoking more than 3-5 weeks. We conducted surveys at baseline, end of pregnancy, and 3 months postpartum. Our primary outcome was biochemically validated 7-day point prevalence abstinence at late pregnancy. Our secondary outcome was reduction in cigarettes per day. RESULTS: Adherence to the SGR was adequate with 70% responding to alert texts to smoke within 60 minutes. Women in both arms quit smoking at the same rate (9%-12%). Women also significantly reduced their smoking from baseline to the end of pregnancy from nine cigarettes to four; we found no arm differences in reduction. CONCLUSIONS: Support text messages alone produced significant quit rates above naturally occurring quitting. SGR did not add significantly to helping women quit or reduce. Sending support messages can reach many women and is low-cost. More obstetric providers might consider having patients who smoke sign up for free texting programs to help them quit. IMPLICATIONS: A disseminable texting program helped some pregnant women quit smoking.Clinical Trial Registration number: NCT01995097.
Authors
Pollak, KI; Lyna, P; Gao, X; Noonan, D; Bejarano Hernandez, S; Subudhi, S; Swamy, GK; Fish, LJ
MLA Citation
Pollak, Kathryn I., et al. “Efficacy of a Texting Program to Promote Cessation Among Pregnant Smokers: A Randomized Control Trial.Nicotine Tob Res, vol. 22, no. 7, June 2020, pp. 1187–94. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/ntr/ntz174.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1417045
PMID
31647564
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nicotine Tob Res
Volume
22
Published Date
Start Page
1187
End Page
1194
DOI
10.1093/ntr/ntz174