Allan Friedman

Overview:

At the present time, I am participating in collaborative research in the areas of primary malignant brain tumors, epilepsy and subarachnoid hemorrhage.

Primary malignant brain tumors are increasing in frequency. Patients harboring glioblastoma, the most malignant primary brain tumor, have a life expectancy of less than one year. In colloboration with the Division of Neurology and the Department of Pathology, clinical and laboratory trials have been initiated to identify better treatment for this condition. At present, trials of monoclonal antibodies and novel chemotherapeutic agents are being carried out.

Although physicians have been interested in seizures since the time of Hippocrates, the origin of seizures remains obscure. At Duke University we have treated approximately thirty seizure patients a year by removing abnormal portions of brain. Tissue from these resections is being analyzed for genetics and receptor abnormalities. Positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are being used to ferret out the origin of the patient's seizures.

Approximately 28,000 patients each year suffer a ruptured intracranial aneurysm. Approximately ten percent of these patients have a genetic predisposition to forming intracranial aneurysms. In conjunction with the Division of Neurology, we are screening candidate genes searching for the cause of intracranial aneurysms.

Positions:

Guy L. Odom Distinguished Professor of Neurosurgery, in the School of Medicine

Neurosurgery
School of Medicine

Professor of Neurosurgery

Neurosurgery
School of Medicine

Interim Chair of Neurosurgery

Neurosurgery
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1974

University of Illinois

Grants:

Novel Targeted Therapeutics for CNS Malignancies

Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Collaborating Investigator
Start Date
End Date

IPA - Bharathi Hattiangady

Administered By
Neurosurgery
Awarded By
Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

IPA - Bing Shuai

Administered By
Neurosurgery
Awarded By
Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

In Memoriam: Robert H. Wilkins, MD, 1934 to 2017.

Authors
MLA Citation
Ewend, Matthew G., et al. “In Memoriam: Robert H. Wilkins, MD, 1934 to 2017.Neurosurgery, vol. 81, no. 1, July 2017, pp. 6–8. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/neuros/nyx283.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1427065
PMID
31895452
Source
pubmed
Published In
Neurosurgery
Volume
81
Published Date
Start Page
6
End Page
8
DOI
10.1093/neuros/nyx283

History of awake mapping and speech and language localization: from modules to networks.

Lesion-symptom correlations shaped the early understanding of cortical localization. The classic Broca-Wernicke model of cortical speech and language organization underwent a paradigm shift in large part due to advances in brain mapping techniques. This initially started by demonstrating that the cortex was excitable. Later, advancements in neuroanesthesia led to awake surgery for epilepsy focus and tumor resection, providing neurosurgeons with a means of studying cortical and subcortical pathways to understand neural architecture and obtain maximal resection while avoiding so-called critical structures. The aim of this historical review is to highlight the essential role of direct electrical stimulation and cortical-subcortical mapping and the advancements it has made to our understanding of speech and language cortical organization. Specifically, using cortical and subcortical mapping, neurosurgeons shifted from a localist view in which the brain is composed of rigid functional modules to one of dynamic and integrative large-scale networks consisting of interconnected cortical subregions.
Authors
Rahimpour, S; Haglund, MM; Friedman, AH; Duffau, H
MLA Citation
Rahimpour, Shervin, et al. “History of awake mapping and speech and language localization: from modules to networks.Neurosurg Focus, vol. 47, no. 3, Sept. 2019, p. E4. Pubmed, doi:10.3171/2019.7.FOCUS19347.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1406899
PMID
31473677
Source
pubmed
Published In
Neurosurgical Focus
Volume
47
Published Date
Start Page
E4
DOI
10.3171/2019.7.FOCUS19347

Research Update in Neuroscience for Neurosurgeons: a historical perspective.

Authors
Reseland, E; Agarwal, N; McDowell, MM; Stone, JG; Tonetti, DA; Awad, IA; Hodge, CJ; Koenig, KS; Friedman, AH; Friedlander, RM
MLA Citation
Reseland, Eric, et al. “Research Update in Neuroscience for Neurosurgeons: a historical perspective.J Neurosurg, vol. 131, no. 2, May 2019, pp. 639–48. Pubmed, doi:10.3171/2019.2.JNS183015.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1388568
PMID
31151108
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Neurosurg
Volume
131
Published Date
Start Page
639
End Page
648
DOI
10.3171/2019.2.JNS183015

Astrocytoma of the spinal cord

MLA Citation
McLendon, R. E., et al. “Astrocytoma of the spinal cord.” Russell and Rubinstein’s Pathology of Tumors of the Nervous System., 2006, pp. 97–102.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1406628
Source
scopus
Published Date
Start Page
97
End Page
102

Diffuse astrocytoma

Authors
McLendon, RE; Gray, L; Shah, L; Friedman, AH
MLA Citation
McLendon, R. E., et al. “Diffuse astrocytoma.” Russell and Rubinstein’s Pathology of Tumors of the Nervous System., 2006, pp. 57–74.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1406629
Source
scopus
Published Date
Start Page
57
End Page
74