Katherine Garman

Overview:

My research focuses on injury, repair, and cancer development in the gastrointestinal tract. My laboratory performs translational research with the goal of improving health of the gastrointestinal tract. Our work is based in observations from human clinical research. We use databases of esophageal and colon disease to learn more about clinical risk factors for disease. We also use pathology samples of tumors to study the gastrointestinal tract in different states: healthy, inflamed or damaged, and with cancer.

Positions:

Associate Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Gastroenterology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Affiliate of the Regeneration Next Initiative

Regeneration Next Initiative
School of Medicine

Member of Duke Molecular Physiology Institute

Duke Molecular Physiology Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2002

Duke University

Medical Resident, Medicine

Duke University

Fellow in Gastroenterology, Medicine

Duke University

Chief Resident, Medicine

Duke University School of Medicine

Fellow in Gastroenterology, Medicine

Duke University

Grants:

Epigenetic Control of Intestinal Inflammation

Administered By
Cell Biology
Awarded By
Kenneth Rainin Foundation
Role
Collaborator
Start Date
End Date

Epigenetic control of intestinal inflammation

Administered By
Cell Biology
Awarded By
Kenneth Rainin Foundation
Role
Collaborator
Start Date
End Date

Submucosal esophageal structures as a progenitor niche for esophageal repair

Administered By
Medicine, Gastroenterology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Development of a Porcine Model of Esophageal Injury and Repair

Administered By
Medicine, Gastroenterology
Awarded By
University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Role of CAV3 Mutation in the Pathogenesis of Barrett's Esophagus

Administered By
Medicine, Gastroenterology
Awarded By
Case Western Reserve University
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Effect of Outpatient Status on Practice Management of H. pylori-associated Peptic Ulcer Disease

Authors
Feder, R; Posner, S; Qin, Y; Zheng, J; Chow, S-C; Garman, KS
MLA Citation
Feder, Rachel, et al. “Effect of Outpatient Status on Practice Management of H. pylori-associated Peptic Ulcer Disease.” American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 112, Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health), 2017, pp. S598–S598. Crossref, doi:10.14309/00000434-201710001-01094.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1339285
Source
crossref
Published In
American Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume
112
Published Date
Start Page
S598
End Page
S598
DOI
10.14309/00000434-201710001-01094

Sa1758 Colonic Tattooing: Differences in Reported and Actual Practices at a Tertiary Medical Center

Authors
Spaete, JP; Chow, S-C; Burbridge, RA; Garman, KS
MLA Citation
Spaete, Joshua P., et al. “Sa1758 Colonic Tattooing: Differences in Reported and Actual Practices at a Tertiary Medical Center.” Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, vol. 83, no. 5, Elsevier BV, 2016, pp. AB289–AB289. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.gie.2016.03.453.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1241393
Source
crossref
Published In
Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
Volume
83
Published Date
Start Page
AB289
End Page
AB289
DOI
10.1016/j.gie.2016.03.453

Prior tonsillectomy is associated with an increased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma.

BACKGROUND: Esophageal cancer is a deadly cancer with 5-year survival <20%. Although multiple risk factors for esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) including obesity, GERD and smoking have been identified, these risk factors do not fully explain the rising incidence of EAC. In this study, we evaluated the association between prior history of tonsillectomy and EAC. Our goal was to determine whether tonsillectomies were more frequent in patients with EAC (cases) than in our thoracic surgery controls. METHODS: Cases included 452 esophagectomy cases, including 396 with EAC and 56 who underwent esophagectomy for Barrett's esophagus (BE) with high grade dysplasia (HGD). 1,102 thoracic surgery patients with surgical indications other than dysplastic BE or esophageal cancer represented the controls for our analysis. The association of tonsillectomy and HGD/EAC were primarily evaluated by using univariate tests and then verified by logistic regression analysis. Baseline demographics, medical history, and thoracic surgery controls were compared by using χ2 tests or 95% CIs. Significant risk factors were considered as covariates in the multivariate models while evaluating the association between tonsillectomy and HGD/EAC. P-values or odds ratios were estimated with 95% confidence limits to identify significances which was more appropriate. RESULTS: Tonsillectomy was more common in cases than controls and was found to have a significant association with esophageal cancer (19.9% vs. 12.7%; p-value = 0.0003). This significant association persisted after controlling for other known risk factors/covariates. CONCLUSION: A prior history of tonsillectomy was significantly associated with HGD/EAC and may represent an independent risk factor for the development of EAC. However, the underlying biology driving this association remains unclear.
Authors
Garman, KS; Ajayi, TA; Boutte, HJ; Chiu, S-T; von Furstenberg, RJ; Lloyd, BR; Zhang, C; Onaitis, MW; Chow, S-C; McCall, SJ
MLA Citation
Garman, Katherine S., et al. “Prior tonsillectomy is associated with an increased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma.Plos One, vol. 15, no. 7, 2020, p. e0235906. Pubmed, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0235906.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1452502
PMID
32697782
Source
pubmed
Published In
Plos One
Volume
15
Published Date
Start Page
e0235906
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0235906

Spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy of tumor and normal excised human colon with thin film Si sensors

© 2019 The Authors. Spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy of normal and cancerous ex-vivo human colon tissue using a thin film Si photodiode array sensor is presented as a step toward the realization of in-vivo endoscopic spectral tissue characterization.
Authors
LaRiviere, B; Garman, KS; Ferguson, NL; Fisher, DA; Jokerst, NM
MLA Citation
LaRiviere, B., et al. “Spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy of tumor and normal excised human colon with thin film Si sensors.” Optics Infobase Conference Papers, vol. Part F166-Sensors 2019, 2019. Scopus, doi:10.1364/SENSORS.2019.STu2D.5.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1446997
Source
scopus
Published In
Optics Infobase Conference Papers
Volume
Part F166-Sensors 2019
Published Date
DOI
10.1364/SENSORS.2019.STu2D.5

Plasmonic nanobiosensors for detection of microRNA cancer biomarkers in clinical samples.

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in the regulation of biological processes and have demonstrated great potential as biomarkers for the early detection of various diseases, including esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and Barrett's esophagus (BE), the premalignant metaplasia associated with EAC. Herein, we demonstrate the direct detection of the esophageal cancer biomarker, miR-21, in RNA extracted from 17 endoscopic tissue biopsies using the nanophotonics technology our group has developed, termed the inverse molecular sentinel (iMS) nanobiosensor, with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection. The potential of this label-free, homogeneous biosensor for cancer diagnosis without the need for target amplification was demonstrated by discriminating esophageal cancer and Barrett's esophagus from normal tissue with notable diagnostic accuracy. This work establishes the potential of the iMS nanobiosensor for cancer diagnostics via miRNA detection in clinical samples without the need for target amplification, validating the potential of this assay as part of a new diagnostic strategy. Combining miRNA diagnostics with the nanophotonics technology will result in a paradigm shift in achieving a general molecular analysis tool that has widespread applicability for cancer research as well as detection of cancer. We anticipate further development of this technique for future use in point-of-care testing as an alternative to histopathological diagnosis as our method provides a quick result following RNA isolation, allowing for timely treatment.
Authors
Crawford, BM; Wang, H-N; Stolarchuk, C; von Furstenberg, RJ; Strobbia, P; Zhang, D; Qin, X; Owzar, K; Garman, KS; Vo-Dinh, T
MLA Citation
Crawford, Bridget M., et al. “Plasmonic nanobiosensors for detection of microRNA cancer biomarkers in clinical samples.Analyst, vol. 145, no. 13, July 2020, pp. 4587–94. Pubmed, doi:10.1039/d0an00193g.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1441616
PMID
32436503
Source
pubmed
Published In
Analyst
Volume
145
Published Date
Start Page
4587
End Page
4594
DOI
10.1039/d0an00193g

Research Areas:

Adenocarcinoma
Barrett Esophagus
Barrett's esophagus
Consumer behavior
Epithelial Cells
Esophageal Neoplasms
Mutation
Proteome