Cristina Gasparetto

Overview:

Dr. Gasparetto performs both laboratory and clinical research in the field of multiple myeloma. Her primary research interests are in developing immunotherapy approaches to treating multiple myeloma particularly in conjunction with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Ongoing laboratory research projects include the development of dendritic cell vaccines and antibody therapies. Clinical studies include a recently approved trial involving vaccination with autologous dendritic cells pulsed with idiotypic protein following high dose chemotherapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cells transplant. Upcoming trials include novel antibody therapies for multiple myeloma. Dr. Gasparetto is also an investigator on several other clinical trials for myeloma including non-myeloablative allogeneic transplantation, high dose sequential chemotherapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation and transplantation of partially HLA matched unrelated cord blood.

Positions:

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1986

Sapienza University of Rome (Italy)

Medical Resident, Medicine

Duke University

Fellow in Hematology/Oncology, Medicine

Duke University

Grants:

Dendritic Cell Based Vaccination for Multiple Myeloma

Administered By
Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase 2, Open-label, Multicenter, Dose-Escalation and Expansion Study of Venetoclax in Combination with Pomalidomide and Dexamethasone in Subjects with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
AbbVie Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase 1/2, Multicenter, Dose-Escalation and Expansion Study of Combination Therapy with Venetoclax, Daratumumab and Dexamethasone (with and without Bortezomib) in Subjects with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
AbbVie Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Open-Label, Multicenter, Dose-Escalation Expansion Phase IB study to Evaluate Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and activity of BET Inhibitor RO6870810, Given as Mono- and combination Therapy to patients with Advanced Multiple Myeloma

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase 1, Open Label Study to evaluate the safety Pharmacokinetic, Pharmacodynamic and clinical activity of PF-06863135, A B-Cell Maturation Antigen (BCMA)- CD3 Bispecifi Antibody In Patient

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Pfizer, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Safety, Clinical Activity, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics from a Phase I Study of PF-06863135, a B-Cell Maturation Antigen (BCMA)-CD3 Bispecific Antibody, in Patients with Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma (RRMM)

<jats:p>Introduction: PF-06863135 (PF-3135) is a bispecific, humanized, monoclonal antibody (mAb) consisting of BCMA- and CD3-targeting arms paired on an IgG2a backbone by hinge-mutation technology. PF-3135 binds BCMA+ myeloma cells and CD3+ T cells with affinities of 20 pM and ~40 nM, respectively (Panowski et al. Blood 2016). We report here findings from the dose-escalation portion of an ongoing, multi-center, open-label, phase I study (NCT03269136) of PF-3135 in patients with RRMM.</jats:p> <jats:p>Methods: Adult patients (≥18 years of age) with RRMM, previously treated with a proteasome inhibitor, an immunomodulatory drug, and an anti-CD38 mAb, received escalating, intravenous (IV) doses of PF-3135, once weekly. Prior BCMA-targeted bispecific T-cell engager or chimeric antigen receptor T-cell (CART) treatment was allowed by protocol. Patients had measurable disease per the International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) updated criteria 2014. A modified toxicity probability interval method (mTPI), targeting a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) rate of 25% (equivalence interval ± 5%) was used for dose escalation. The primary study objectives are to assess PF-3135 safety and tolerability, to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and select the recommended phase II dose (RP2D). Secondary objectives include evaluation of anti-myeloma activity, pharmacokinetics (PK), and immunogenicity of PF-3135.</jats:p> <jats:p>Results: As of April 9, 2019, 17 patients had received once weekly, non-continuous, IV infusion of PF-3135 in 6 dose-escalation groups. The majority were men (71%). The median age was 61 yrs (range, 47-82 yrs) and median disease duration since onset was 7 yrs (range, 1.1-13.3 yrs). Ten (59%) patients had ≥1 chromosomal abnormality and 5 (29%) had a normal karyotype (status not known for 2 [12%] patients). The median number of prior anti-myeloma therapies was 11; 5 (29%) patients had received prior BCMA-targeted therapy. Eight (47%) patients had relapsed MM and 8 (47%) had refractory disease (recurrence type not known for 1 [6%] patient). Ten (59%) patients experienced treatment-related (TR) AEs of any grade. Most TRAEs were grade 1-2, including cytokine release syndrome (CRS, 24%), thrombocytopenia (24%), anemia (18%), and pyrexia (18%). Three (18%) patients had grade 3 TRAEs (increased alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase, leukocytopenia, neutropenia, and lymphopenia). One patient treated at the highest dose level, who had received prior BCMA CART therapy, developed treatment-related febrile neutropenia, a DLT, which may have been related to CRS and borderline/low neutrophil count at baseline. None of the patients had grade 4-5 TRAEs or discontinued treatment due to a TRAE. The median duration of treatment was 4 (range, 2-12) actual dosing days. Sixteen of the 17 patients were evaluable for response. At the time of data cut-off, one (6%) patient had a minimal response and 6 (35%) patients had stable disease (SD) across dose levels, as best response by investigator IMWG assessment; 9 (53%) patients experienced disease progression. The clinical benefit rate (defined as best response ≥SD) was 41% (95% CI: 18.4%, 67.1%).</jats:p> <jats:p>Conclusions: Treatment with IV PF-3135 was well tolerated at the dose levels evaluated. The observed CRS events were moderate and dose-dependent. Additional dose cohorts are accruing. The latest clinical, biomarker, and PK data will be presented for this ongoing study.</jats:p> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Disclosures</jats:title> <jats:p>Raje: Medscape: Honoraria; Research to Practice: Honoraria; Takeda: Consultancy, Honoraria; Merck: Consultancy, Honoraria; Janssen: Consultancy, Honoraria; Celgene: Consultancy, Honoraria; BMS: Consultancy, Honoraria; Amgen: Consultancy, Honoraria; AstraZeneca: Research Funding. Jakubowiak:Janssen: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; GSK: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Takeda: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Adaptive Biotechnologies: Consultancy, Honoraria; Juno: Consultancy, Honoraria; Sanofi: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; SkyLineDx: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; AbbVie: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Amgen: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; BMS: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; KaryoPharm Therapeutics: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Millennium: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Celgene: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Gasparetto:Janssen: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Travel, accommodations, or other expenses paid or reimbursed ; BMS: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Travel, accommodations, or other expenses paid or reimbursed ; Celgene: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Travel, accommodations, or other expenses paid or reimbursed . Cornell:KaryoPharm: Consultancy; Takeda: Consultancy. Krupka:Pfizer: Employment, Equity Ownership. Navarro:Pfizer: Employment, Equity Ownership. Forgie:Pfizer: Employment, Equity Ownership. Udata:Pfizer: Employment, Equity Ownership. Basu:Pfizer: Employment, Equity Ownership. Chou:Pfizer: Employment, Equity Ownership. Leung:Pfizer: Employment, Equity Ownership. Lesokhin:BMS: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding; Serametrix Inc.: Patents &amp; Royalties; Takeda: Consultancy, Honoraria; Genentech: Research Funding; Juno: Consultancy, Honoraria; GenMab: Consultancy, Honoraria; Janssen: Research Funding.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>OffLabel Disclosure:</jats:title> <jats:p>PF-06863135, investigational agent</jats:p> </jats:sec>
Authors
Raje, NS; Jakubowiak, A; Gasparetto, C; Cornell, RF; Krupka, HI; Navarro, D; Forgie, AJ; Udata, C; Basu, C; Chou, J; Leung, A; Lesokhin, AM
MLA Citation
Raje, Noopur S., et al. “Safety, Clinical Activity, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics from a Phase I Study of PF-06863135, a B-Cell Maturation Antigen (BCMA)-CD3 Bispecific Antibody, in Patients with Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma (RRMM).” Blood, vol. 134, no. Supplement_1, American Society of Hematology, 2019, pp. 1869–1869. Crossref, doi:10.1182/blood-2019-121805.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1469912
Source
crossref
Published In
Blood
Volume
134
Published Date
Start Page
1869
End Page
1869
DOI
10.1182/blood-2019-121805

Results from a Phase II Study of Isatuximab As a Single Agent and in Combination with Dexamethasone in Patients with Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title> <jats:p>Background: Isatuximab (ISA) targets CD38-expressing tumor cells through a combination of activities, including antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, direct pro-apoptotic activity, and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. A phase I study evaluating ISA monotherapy demonstrated promising clinical activity in 35 patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM) (Martin T et al, J Clin Oncol 2014; 32:8532). This is an ongoing phase II study (NCT01084252) with 2 stages: stage 1 to select the dose for stage 2 of the study, and stage 2 to assess efficacy and safety of ISA monotherapy or in combination with dexamethasone in RRMM. In stage 1, patients were randomized to 1 of 3 dose groups: ISA 3 mg/kg Q2W, 10 mg/kg Q2W × 2 cycles then Q4W, or 10 mg/kg Q2W. Based on pharmacokinetic data, a fourth dose of 20 mg/kg QW × 4 doses then Q2W was added. The overall response rates (ORRs) for the 4 dosing schemes were 4% (1/23), 20% (5/25), 29% (7/24), and 24% (6/25), respectively. Based on these results, a dose of 20 mg/kg QW for cycle 1 followed by 20 mg/kg Q2W in subsequent cycles was chosen for stage 2 of the study (Richter J et al, J Clin Oncol 2016;34:8005). Here, we report the baseline characteristics and demographic data from stage 2 at the selected dosing scheme from stage 1. Full safety and efficacy data will be presented at the meeting.</jats:p> <jats:p>Methods: This study enrolled patients with MM who had previously received an immunomodulatory drug and a proteasome inhibitor. Patients received ISA monotherapy (20 mg/kg on Day 1, 8, 15, and 22 [QW] of cycle 1 followed by 20 mg/kg on Day 1 and 15 [Q2W] of subsequent cycles) or ISA in combination with dexamethasone (40 mg/day [20 mg/day in patients ≥75 years old]). The primary objective was to evaluate the activity of ISA as monotherapy and in combination with dexamethasone in patients with RRMM in terms of ORR.</jats:p> <jats:p>Results: A total of 165 patients received at least 1 cycle of treatment. Median age was 67 (37-85) years. Median time from diagnosis to first dose was 5.35 (0.7-23.0) years. Median number of prior lines was 4 (2-11) and median number of prior regimens was 6 (2-17). Patients received a median of 5 (1-17) cycles of treatment, with a median duration of exposure of 22 (1-69) weeks. Discontinuation occurred in 106 (64.2%) patients due to adverse events (15 patients, 9.1%), disease progression (85 patients, 51.5%), or patient decision (6 patients, 3.6%).</jats:p> <jats:p>Conclusion: The full efficacy and safety data for this heavily pre-treated RRMM population will be available for presentation at the meeting.</jats:p> <jats:p>Funding: Sanofi</jats:p> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Disclosures</jats:title> <jats:p>Dimopoulos: Janssen: Honoraria; Takeda: Honoraria; Bristol-Myers Squibb: Honoraria; Amgen: Honoraria; Celgene: Honoraria. Bringhen:Celgene: Honoraria; Amgen: Honoraria, Other: Advisory Board; Janssen: Honoraria, Other: Advisory Board; Takeda: Consultancy; Bristol-Myers Squibb: Honoraria. Anttila:Janssen: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Amgen: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Takeda: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Capra:Janssen: Research Funding, Speakers Bureau; Roche: Speakers Bureau; Amgen: Speakers Bureau; AbbVie: Research Funding; Sanofi: Research Funding; Bristol Myers Squibb: Research Funding; Novartis: Research Funding. Cavo:AbbVie: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Janssen: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau; GlaxoSmithKline: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Celgene: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau; Takeda: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Adaptive Biotechnologies: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Amgen: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Bristol-Myers Squibb: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Cole:University of Michigan: Employment; Cancer Support Community myeloma advisory board: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Gasparetto:Celgene: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Travel, Research Funding; Janssen: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Travel; Bristol-Myers Squibb: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Travel; Takeda: Honoraria. Hungria:Janssen: Honoraria; Celgene: Honoraria; Amgen: Honoraria; Takeda: Honoraria. Jenner:Celgene: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Speakers Bureau; Novartis: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Speakers Bureau; Amgen: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Speakers Bureau; Takeda: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Speakers Bureau. Vorobyev:Janssen: Consultancy, Speakers Bureau; Roche: Consultancy, Speakers Bureau; Biocad: Consultancy; Takeda: Speakers Bureau; BMS: Speakers Bureau; Astellas: Speakers Bureau. Yanez Ruiz:Universidad de la Frontera: Employment. Yin:Sanofi: Employment. Hamlett:BDM Consulting Inc.: Employment; Sanofi: Consultancy. Vij:Jansson: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Bristol-Myers Squibb: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding; Amgen: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Karyopharma: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Jazz Pharmaceuticals: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Takeda: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding; Celgene: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding.</jats:p> </jats:sec>
Authors
Dimopoulos, MA; Bringhen, S; Anttila, P; Capra, M; Cavo, M; Cole, CE; Gasparetto, CJ; Hungria, VTM; Jenner, M; Vorobyev, V; Yanez Ruiz, E; Yin, J; Hamlett, A; Vij, R
MLA Citation
Dimopoulos, Meletios A., et al. “Results from a Phase II Study of Isatuximab As a Single Agent and in Combination with Dexamethasone in Patients with Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma.” Blood, vol. 132, no. Supplement 1, American Society of Hematology, 2018, pp. 155–155. Crossref, doi:10.1182/blood-2018-155.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1373818
Source
crossref
Published In
Blood
Volume
132
Published Date
Start Page
155
End Page
155
DOI
10.1182/blood-2018-155

Treatment Patterns from 2009 to 2015 in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma in the United States: A Report from the Connect® MM Registry

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title> <jats:p>Introduction: Between 2009 and 2015, use of novel therapies (immunomodulating drugs and proteasome inhibitors) in multiple myeloma (MM) increased. Regimens initiated during this time frame may help project near-term future treatment patterns. Connect® MM is the first and largest prospective, observational, US-based, multicenter disease registry designed to characterize treatment patterns and outcomes for patients (pts) with newly diagnosed MM (NDMM). Pts with NDMM were enrolled in 2 sequential cohorts from Sep 2009 to Apr 2016. This noninterventional registry did not prescribe or limit therapy choices. Study sites represented all census regions, with 89% and 11% split between community and academic sites, respectively. This allowed a reasonable generalizability to patterns for the US.</jats:p> <jats:p>Methods: Connect® MM enrollment was initiated in Sep 2009 at 250 community and academic sites. Pts were enrolled within 2 months of diagnosis. Cohort 1 enrolled 1493 NDMM pts from Sep 2009 to Dec 2011, and Cohort 2 enrolled 1518 NDMM pts from Dec 2012 to Apr 2016. Data were collected at a baseline visit and quarterly visits thereafter until death or discontinuation. The current analysis was conducted for the population of treated pts (N=2848) as of May 2016. This study examined recorded treatment choice of first-line regimen, maintenance therapy, and second-line regimen in 6-month intervals. Trends in regimens were graphically represented using "Tepee" plots (Srinivasan, Shankar. Resource Tepee. Patent US 7,495,673 B1. 24 Feb 2009). Briefly, all pts who initiated treatment during each 6-month interval are represented horizontally, with each horizontal line indicating 100% of all treatment used in that period. The regimens are represented by gray shading with wider bands signifying the more frequently used regimens at each time interval.</jats:p> <jats:p>Results: Median follow‐up for all pts was 39.3 months (0.03‐78.4) in Cohort 1 and 15.4 months (0.2-40.1) in Cohort 2. For the treated population, the median age was 67 years (range 24‐94), 58% were male, 83% were white, and 38% of those reporting International Staging System stage had stage III MM. By US geographical region, 329 (11.6%) pts were from the Northeast, 1036 (36.4%) from the Midwest, 1117 (39.2%) from the South, 360 (12.6%) from the West, 4 (0.1%) from Puerto Rico, and 2 missing (0.05%). Most pts (2285; 80.2%) were from community sites, and 397 (13.9%) were from academic sites with the remaining from government sites. A total of 1416 (47.4%) reported an intent to transplant (stem cell transplant [SCT]) at the initiation of therapy. A total of 666 (25.8%) have progressed and entered second line. Tepee plots of treatment patterns for start of induction for those pts with and without SCT intent are provided in Figure 1A and 1B, respectively. The year 2012 does not feature in these induction plots, as this period corresponds to a time when pts were not enrolled-Cohort 1 had been completed and Cohort 2 had not yet opened. The 4 most common induction regimens for SCT intent, from left to right, in order of decreasing frequency of use, were lenalidomide (R), bortezomib (V), dexamethasone (D) combined (RVD); VD; cyclophosphamide plus VD (CyBorD); and RD. The 5 most common induction regimens for those without SCT intent, from left to right, in order of decreasing frequency of use, were VD, RD, RVD, CyBorD, and V. Triplet therapy in first-line induction pts increased in frequency from 2009 to 2014. The 4 most frequent maintenance regimens for those with SCT intent were R monotherapy, V monotherapy, RD, and RVD. The 4 most common maintenance regimens for pts who did not intend to receive SCT were R monotherapy, RD, VD, and V monotherapy. The most prevalent regimens in the second line were VD, RD, V, and RVD. Additional graphs including treatment patterns by age group (≤ 70 vs &gt; 70 years) and maintenance by conduct of first-line SCT will be presented.</jats:p> <jats:p>Conclusions: Our work utilizes Tepee plots to outline induction and maintenance treatment patterns over time, for both SCT and non-SCT intent pts, using the largest, prospective, noninterventional registry study in the US. Triplet therapy use increased in the time period studied, with RVD being the most frequently used triplet for pts with or without SCT intent. The most common maintenance regimens included R as monotherapy or in combination.</jats:p> <jats:p /> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Disclosures</jats:title> <jats:p>Rifkin: Takeda: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Celgene: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Amgen/ONYX: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Abonour:Celgene: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Durie:Amgen: Consultancy; Janssen: Consultancy; Takeda: Consultancy. Gasparetto:Celgene: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding; Takeda: Consultancy; Janssen: Honoraria; Bristol-Myers Squibb: Honoraria. Jagannath:Bristol-Myers Squibb: Consultancy; Celgene: Consultancy; Merck: Consultancy. Terebelo:Celgene: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Toomey:Celgene: Consultancy. Kitali:Celgene: Employment, Equity Ownership. Zafar:Celgene: Employment. Srinivasan:Celgene: Employment; Individual Patent: Patents &amp; Royalties: US7,495,673B1 Used for MM-Connect Treatment Patterns Abstract.. Hardin:Celgene: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees.</jats:p> </jats:sec>
Authors
Rifkin, RM; Abonour, R; Durie, BGM; Gasparetto, CJ; Jagannath, S; Narang, M; Shah, JJ; Terebelo, HR; Toomey, K; Kitali, A; Zafar, F; Srinivasan, S; Hardin, JW
MLA Citation
Rifkin, Robert M., et al. “Treatment Patterns from 2009 to 2015 in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma in the United States: A Report from the Connect® MM Registry.” Blood, vol. 128, no. 22, American Society of Hematology, 2016, pp. 4489–4489. Crossref, doi:10.1182/blood.v128.22.4489.4489.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1347208
Source
crossref
Published In
Blood
Volume
128
Published Date
Start Page
4489
End Page
4489
DOI
10.1182/blood.v128.22.4489.4489

Engraftment Failure or Aplastic Anemia: A Case Report

Authors
Liu, J; Johns, A; Gasparetto, C
MLA Citation
Liu, JoAnn, et al. “Engraftment Failure or Aplastic Anemia: A Case Report.” Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, vol. 21, no. 2, Elsevier BV, 2015, pp. S140–41. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.bbmt.2014.11.195.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1071058
Source
crossref
Published In
Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation : Journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Volume
21
Published Date
Start Page
S140
End Page
S141
DOI
10.1016/j.bbmt.2014.11.195

Changes in patient-reported outcomes in patients diagnosed with and treated for multiple myeloma in the Connect MM registry

Authors
Pashos, CL; Shah, JJ; Terebelo, HR; Durie, BG; Abonour, R; Gasparetto, C; Mehta, J; Narang, M; Thomas, S; Toomey, K; Swern, AS; Sullivan, KA; Street, TK; Khan, ZM; Nourbakhsh, A; Hardin, J; Wildes, TM; Rifkin, RM
MLA Citation
Pashos, Chris L., et al. “Changes in patient-reported outcomes in patients diagnosed with and treated for multiple myeloma in the Connect MM registry.” Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 31, no. 15, AMER SOC CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 2013.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1033474
Source
wos
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
31
Published Date