Cristina Gasparetto

Overview:

Dr. Gasparetto performs both laboratory and clinical research in the field of multiple myeloma. Her primary research interests are in developing immunotherapy approaches to treating multiple myeloma particularly in conjunction with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Ongoing laboratory research projects include the development of dendritic cell vaccines and antibody therapies. Clinical studies include a recently approved trial involving vaccination with autologous dendritic cells pulsed with idiotypic protein following high dose chemotherapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cells transplant. Upcoming trials include novel antibody therapies for multiple myeloma. Dr. Gasparetto is also an investigator on several other clinical trials for myeloma including non-myeloablative allogeneic transplantation, high dose sequential chemotherapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation and transplantation of partially HLA matched unrelated cord blood.

Positions:

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1986

Sapienza University of Rome (Italy)

Medical Resident, Medicine

Duke University

Fellow in Hematology/Oncology, Medicine

Duke University

Grants:

Dendritic Cell Based Vaccination for Multiple Myeloma

Administered By
Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase 2, Open-label, Multicenter, Dose-Escalation and Expansion Study of Venetoclax in Combination with Pomalidomide and Dexamethasone in Subjects with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
AbbVie Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase 1/2, Multicenter, Dose-Escalation and Expansion Study of Combination Therapy with Venetoclax, Daratumumab and Dexamethasone (with and without Bortezomib) in Subjects with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
AbbVie Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Open-Label, Multicenter, Dose-Escalation Expansion Phase IB study to Evaluate Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and activity of BET Inhibitor RO6870810, Given as Mono- and combination Therapy to patients with Advanced Multiple Myeloma

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase 1, Open Label Study to evaluate the safety Pharmacokinetic, Pharmacodynamic and clinical activity of PF-06863135, A B-Cell Maturation Antigen (BCMA)- CD3 Bispecifi Antibody In Patient

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Pfizer, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Association between race and treatment patterns and survival outcomes in multiple myeloma: A Connect MM Registry analysis.

BACKGROUND: Studies have reported racial disparities in access to and use of multiple myeloma (MM) treatments between African American (AA) and White patients. Although AA patients demonstrate longer disease-specific survival, this has not uniformly translated into improved survival over time. The association between race and treatment patterns and survival outcomes was analyzed using data from the Connect MM Registry. METHODS: The Connect MM Registry is a large US, multicenter, prospective observational cohort study of patients with newly diagnosed MM. Patients who received first-line (1L) stem cell transplantation (SCT) or who did not receive SCT (non-SCT or non-stem cell transplantation [NSCT]) were grouped by raceEffects of race and transplantation status on the use of triplet treatment were estimated using logistic regression. RESULTS: Treatment patterns in 1L (types and duration of induction, posttransplantation maintenance) were similar between AA and White patients. SCT rates in 1L (32% vs 36%) and triplet treatment use (AA: 44% for NSCT patients and 72% for SCT patients; and White: 48% for NSCT patients and 72% for SCT patients) during first induction were similar. No significant effect of race or transplantation status on 1L triplet treatment use was observed. Race was not found to be associated with survival outcomes among patients who underwent NSCT; however, AA patients who received SCT had significantly longer overall survival compared with White patients who underwent SCT (not reached vs 88.2 months; hazard ratio, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.35-0.89 [P = .0141]). CONCLUSIONS: AA and White patients were found to have similar treatment patterns in the Connect MM Registry, suggesting that both groups had equal access to health care. In this real-world setting, AA patients received standard-of-care treatment, which might have contributed to better MM-specific survival compared with White patients.
Authors
Ailawadhi, S; Jagannath, S; Lee, HC; Narang, M; Rifkin, RM; Terebelo, HR; Durie, BGM; Toomey, K; Hardin, JW; Gasparetto, CJ; Wagner, L; Omel, JL; He, M; Yue, L; Flick, ED; Agarwal, A; Abonour, R; Connect MM Registry Investigators,
MLA Citation
Ailawadhi, Sikander, et al. “Association between race and treatment patterns and survival outcomes in multiple myeloma: A Connect MM Registry analysis.Cancer, July 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cncr.33089.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1453201
PMID
32706404
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Published Date
DOI
10.1002/cncr.33089

Phase I dose escalation study of naive T-cell depleted donor lymphocyte infusion following allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

Prophylactic donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI) are used to augment post-transplant immune recovery to reduce both infectious complications and disease recurrence. Preclinical studies implicate the naive T-cell subset as the primary driver of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). In this phase I dose escalation study, we assessed the safety of a DLI that was depleted of CD45RA+ naive T cells. Sixteen adult patients received a prophylactic DLI at a median of 113 days (range 76-280 days) following an HLA-identical, non-myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Three patients each received the naive T-cell depleted DLI with a CD3+ dose of 1 × 105/kg, 1 × 106/kg, and 5 × 106/kg. The maximum dose of 1 × 107/kg was expanded to 7 patients. No dose-limiting grade III/IV acute GvHD or adverse events attributable to the DLI were observed at any dose level. One patient developed grade 2 acute GvHD of skin and upper intestines, and another developed moderate chronic GvHD of the lungs following the DLI. With a median follow-up of 2.8 years, 2-year progression-free and overall survival is 50.0% and 68.8%, respectively. In conclusion, these data suggest that a DLI that has been depleted of CD45RA+ naive T cells is feasible and carries a low risk of acute or chronic GvHD.
Authors
Maung, KK; Chen, BJ; Barak, I; Li, Z; Rizzieri, DA; Gasparetto, C; Sullivan, KM; Long, GD; Engemann, AM; Waters-Pick, B; Nichols, KR; Lopez, R; Kang, Y; Sarantopoulos, S; Sung, AD; Chao, NJ; Horwitz, ME
MLA Citation
Maung, Ko K., et al. “Phase I dose escalation study of naive T-cell depleted donor lymphocyte infusion following allogeneic stem cell transplantation.Bone Marrow Transplant, July 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41409-020-0991-5.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1450672
PMID
32624583
Source
pubmed
Published In
Bone Marrow Transplant
Published Date
DOI
10.1038/s41409-020-0991-5

Impact of initial treatment (tx) on HRQoL and outcomes in patients (pts) with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (NDMM) without intent for immediate transplant (SCT): Results from the Connect® MM registry.

Authors
Abonour, R; Rifkin, RM; Gasparetto, C; Toomey, K; Durie, BGM; Hardin, JW; Terebelo, HR; Jagannath, S; Narang, M; Ailawadhi, S; Srinivasan, S; Kitali, A; Agarwal, A; Wagner, L
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1373376
PMID
32136867
Source
pubmed
Published In
Ann Oncol
Volume
29 Suppl 8
Published Date
Start Page
viii360
DOI
10.1093/annonc/mdy286.003

Treatment Journeys of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma (NDMM): Results From The Connect MM Registry.

Authors
Jagannath, S; Rifkin, RM; Gasparetto, CJ; Toomey, K; Durie, BGM; Hardin, JW; Terebelo, HR; Wagner, L; Narang, M; Ailawadhi, S; Omel, JL; Srinivasan, S; He, M; Ung, B; Kitali, A; Flick, ED; Agarwal, A; Abonour, R; CONNECT MM Registry Investigators,
MLA Citation
Jagannath, Sundar, et al. “Treatment Journeys of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma (NDMM): Results From The Connect MM Registry.Clin Lymphoma Myeloma Leuk, vol. 20, no. 5, May 2020, pp. 272–76. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.clml.2019.10.002.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1434371
PMID
32144027
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clin Lymphoma Myeloma Leuk
Volume
20
Published Date
Start Page
272
End Page
276
DOI
10.1016/j.clml.2019.10.002

Integrated safety profile of selinexor in multiple myeloma: experience from 437 patients enrolled in clinical trials.

Selinexor is an oral, small molecule inhibitor of the nuclear export protein exportin 1 with demonstrated activity in hematologic and solid malignancies. Side effects associated with selinexor include nausea, vomiting, fatigue, diarrhea, decreased appetite, weight loss, thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, and hyponatremia. We reviewed 437 patients with multiple myeloma treated with selinexor and assessed the kinetics of adverse events and impact of supportive care measures. Selinexor reduced both platelets and neutrophils over the first cycle of treatment and reached a nadir between 28 and 42 days. Platelet transfusions and thrombopoietin receptor agonists were effective at treating thrombocytopenia, and granulocyte colony stimulating factors were effective at resolving neutropenia. The onset of gastrointestinal side effects (nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea) was most common during the first 1-2 weeks of treatment. Nausea could be mitigated with 5-HT3 antagonists and either neurokinin 1 receptor antagonists, olanzapine, or cannbainoids. Loperamide and bismuth subsalicylate ameliorated diarrhea. The primary constitutional side effects of fatigue and decreased appetite could be managed with methylphenidate, megestrol, cannabinoids or olanzapine, respectively. Hyponatremia was highly responsive to sodium replacement. Selinexor has well-established adverse effects that mainly occur within the first 8 weeks of treatment, are reversible, and respond to supportive care.
Authors
Gavriatopoulou, M; Chari, A; Chen, C; Bahlis, N; Vogl, DT; Jakubowiak, A; Dingli, D; Cornell, RF; Hofmeister, CC; Siegel, D; Berdeja, JG; Reece, D; White, D; Lentzsch, S; Gasparetto, C; Huff, CA; Jagannath, S; Baz, R; Nooka, AK; Richter, J; Abonour, R; Parker, TL; Yee, AJ; Moreau, P; Lonial, S; Tuchman, S; Weisel, KC; Mohty, M; Choquet, S; Unger, TJ; Li, K; Chai, Y; Li, L; Shah, J; Shacham, S; Kauffman, MG; Dimopoulos, MA
MLA Citation
Gavriatopoulou, Maria, et al. “Integrated safety profile of selinexor in multiple myeloma: experience from 437 patients enrolled in clinical trials.Leukemia, Feb. 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41375-020-0756-6.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1433098
PMID
32094461
Source
pubmed
Published In
Leukemia
Published Date
DOI
10.1038/s41375-020-0756-6