Geoffrey Ginsburg

Overview:

Dr. Geoffrey S. Ginsburg's research interests are in the development of novel paradigms for developing and translating genomic information into medical practice and the integration of personalized medicine into health care.

Positions:

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Cardiology
School of Medicine

Director of Duke Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine

Duke Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine
School of Medicine

Professor in Pathology

Pathology
School of Medicine

Professor in the School of Nursing

School of Nursing
School of Nursing

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1984

Boston University

Ph.D. 1984

Boston University

Medical Resident, Medicine

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Fellow in Cardiology, Medicine

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Research Fellow in Cardiology, Medicine

Children's Hospital Boston

Grants:

Building and Deploying a Genomic-Medicine Risk Assessment Model for Diverse Primary Care Populations.

Administered By
Duke Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Investigator
Start Date
End Date

The IGNITE II CC: Engagement, Coordination, Demonstration, and Dissemination

Administered By
Duke Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

The IGNITE II CC: Engagement, Coordination, Demonstration, and Dissemination

Administered By
Duke Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

The Role of Junctophilin Type 2 in Cardiac Node Automaticity

Administered By
Pediatrics, Cardiology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Mentor
Start Date
End Date

Predicting prebiotic effects on human microbiota, behavior, and cognition.

Administered By
Molecular Genetics and Microbiology
Awarded By
Office of Naval Research
Role
Collaborator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Correction: Opportunities to implement a sustainable genomic medicine program: lessons learned from the IGNITE Network.

An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Authors
Levy, KD; Blake, K; Fletcher-Hoppe, C; Franciosi, J; Goto, D; Hicks, JK; Holmes, AM; Kanuri, SH; Madden, EB; Musty, MD; Orlando, L; Pratt, VM; Ramos, M; Wu, R; Ginsburg, GS
MLA Citation
Levy, Kenneth D., et al. “Correction: Opportunities to implement a sustainable genomic medicine program: lessons learned from the IGNITE Network.Genet Med, July 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41436-020-0911-5.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1453218
PMID
32719393
Source
pubmed
Published In
Genet Med
Published Date
DOI
10.1038/s41436-020-0911-5

Influence of Sex on Platelet Reactivity in Response to Aspirin.

Background There are sex differences in the efficacy and safety of aspirin for the prevention of myocardial infarction and stroke. Whether this is explained by underlying differences in platelet reactivity and aspirin response remains poorly understood. Methods and Results Healthy volunteers (n=378 208 women) and patients with coronary artery disease or coronary artery disease risk factors (n=217 112 women) took aspirin for 4 weeks. Light transmittance aggregometry using platelet-rich plasma was used to measure platelet reactivity in response to epinephrine, collagen, and ADP at baseline, 3 hours after the first aspirin dose, and after 4 weeks of daily aspirin therapy. A subset of patients underwent pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic assessment with levels of salicylate and cyclooxygenase-1-derived prostaglandin metabolites and light transmittance aggregometry in response to arachidonic acid and after ex vivo exposure to aspirin. At baseline, women had increased platelet aggregation in response to ADP and collagen. Innate platelet response to aspirin, assessed with ex vivo aspirin exposure of baseline platelets, did not differ by sex. Three hours after the first oral aspirin dose, platelet aggregation was inhibited in women to a greater degree in response to epinephrine and to a lesser degree with collagen. After 4 weeks of daily therapy, despite higher salicylate concentrations and greater cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition, women exhibited an attenuation of platelet inhibition in response to epinephrine and ADP. Conclusions We observed agonist-dependent sex differences in platelet responses to aspirin. Despite higher cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition, daily aspirin exposure resulted in a paradoxical attenuation of platelet inhibition in response to epinephrine and ADP over time in women but not in men.
Authors
Friede, KA; Infeld, MM; Tan, RS; Knickerbocker, HJ; Myers, RA; Dubois, LG; Thompson, JW; Kaddurah-Daouk, R; Ginsburg, GS; Ortel, TL; Voora, D
MLA Citation
Friede, Kevin A., et al. “Influence of Sex on Platelet Reactivity in Response to Aspirin.J Am Heart Assoc, vol. 9, no. 14, July 2020, p. e014726. Pubmed, doi:10.1161/JAHA.119.014726.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1452145
PMID
32654613
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of the American Heart Association
Volume
9
Published Date
Start Page
e014726
DOI
10.1161/JAHA.119.014726

The Project Baseline Health Study: a step towards a broader mission to map human health.

The Project Baseline Health Study (PBHS) was launched to map human health through a comprehensive understanding of both the health of an individual and how it relates to the broader population. The study will contribute to the creation of a biomedical information system that accounts for the highly complex interplay of biological, behavioral, environmental, and social systems. The PBHS is a prospective, multicenter, longitudinal cohort study that aims to enroll thousands of participants with diverse backgrounds who are representative of the entire health spectrum. Enrolled participants will be evaluated serially using clinical, molecular, imaging, sensor, self-reported, behavioral, psychological, environmental, and other health-related measurements. An initial deeply phenotyped cohort will inform the development of a large, expanded virtual cohort. The PBHS will contribute to precision health and medicine by integrating state of the art testing, longitudinal monitoring and participant engagement, and by contributing to the development of an improved platform for data sharing and analysis.
Authors
Arges, K; Assimes, T; Bajaj, V; Balu, S; Bashir, MR; Beskow, L; Blanco, R; Califf, R; Campbell, P; Carin, L; Christian, V; Cousins, S; Das, M; Dockery, M; Douglas, PS; Dunham, A; Eckstrand, J; Fleischmann, D; Ford, E; Fraulo, E; French, J; Gambhir, SS; Ginsburg, GS; Green, RC; Haddad, F; Hernandez, A; Hernandez, J; Huang, ES; Jaffe, G; King, D; Koweek, LH; Langlotz, C; Liao, YJ; Mahaffey, KW; Marcom, K; Marks, WJ; Maron, D; McCabe, R; McCall, S; McCue, R; Mega, J; Miller, D; Muhlbaier, LH; Munshi, R; Newby, LK; Pak-Harvey, E; Patrick-Lake, B; Pencina, M; Peterson, ED; Rodriguez, F; Shore, S; Shah, S; Shipes, S; Sledge, G; Spielman, S; Spitler, R; Schaack, T; Swamy, G; Willemink, MJ; Wong, CA
MLA Citation
Arges, Kristine, et al. “The Project Baseline Health Study: a step towards a broader mission to map human health.Npj Digit Med, vol. 3, 2020, p. 84. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41746-020-0290-y.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1448045
PMID
32550652
Source
pubmed
Published In
Npj Digital Medicine
Volume
3
Published Date
Start Page
84
DOI
10.1038/s41746-020-0290-y

Nasal microbiota exhibit neither reproducible nor orderly dynamics following rhinoviral infection

<jats:p>Background: How human-associated microbial communities resist and respond to perturbations remains incompletely understood. Viral challenge provides one opportunity to test how human microbiota respond to disturbance. Methods: Using an experimental human rhinovirus infection challenge model, we explored how viral infection may alter microbiota of the upper respiratory tract (URT). Healthy human volunteers were inoculated with HRV serotype 39. Samples were collected by lavage before and after inoculation from healthy (sham inoculated, n=7) and infected (n=15) individuals and subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequencing through amplification of the V4 hypervariable region. Results: No evidence for differences in community alpha-diversity between cohorts was observed. The composition of microbiota of sham-treated and infected subjects did not appear distinguishable and no taxa were significantly associated with infection status. We did not observe support for a correlation between microbial dynamics and counts of specific monocytes. Subject identity was found to be the strongest determinant of community structure in our dataset. Conclusions: Overall, our findings do not suggest a consistent nasopharyngeal microbiota response to rhinovirus challenge. We support the conclusion that this microbial community is individualized. Broadly, our findings contribute to our understanding of how and when immune responses to viruses affect bacterial communities in the URT.</jats:p>
Authors
Nimmagadda, SN; Midani, FS; Durand, H; Reese, AT; Murdoch, C; Nicholson, BP; Veldman, T; Burke, TW; Zaas, AK; Woods, CW; Ginsburg, G; David, LA
MLA Citation
Nimmagadda, Sai N., et al. Nasal microbiota exhibit neither reproducible nor orderly dynamics following rhinoviral infection. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Crossref, doi:10.1101/2020.04.11.20061911.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1437964
Source
crossref
DOI
10.1101/2020.04.11.20061911

Evaluation of family health history collection methods impact on data and risk assessment outcomes.

Information technology applications for patient-collection of family health history (FHH) increase identification of elevated-risk individuals compared to usual care. It is unknown if the method of collection impacts data collected or if simply going directly to the patient is what makes the difference. The objective of this study was to examine differences in data detail and risk identification rates between FHH collection directly from individuals using paper-based forms and an interactive web-based platform. This is a non-randomized epidemiologic study in Singaporean population from 2016 to 2018. Intervention was paper-based versus web-based interactive platform for FHH collection. Participant demographics, FHH detail, and risk assessment results were analyzed. 882 participants enrolled in the study, 481 in the paper-based group and 401 in the web-based group with mean (SD) age of 45.4 (12.98) years and 47.5% male. Web-based FHH collection participants had an increased number of conditions per relative (p-value <0.001), greater frequency of reporting age of onset (p-value <0.001), and greater odds of receiving ≥1 risk recommendation both overall (OR: 3.99 (2.41, 6.59)) and within subcategories of genetic counselling for hereditary cancer syndromes (p-value = 0.041) and screening and prevention for breast (p-value = 0.002) and colon cancer (p-value = 0.005). This has significant implications for clinical care and research efforts where FHH is being assessed. Using interactive information technology platforms to collect FHH can improve the completeness of the data collected and result in increased rates of risk identification. Methods of data collection to maximize benefit should be taken into account in future studies and clinical care.
Authors
Wu, RR; Sultana, R; Bylstra, Y; Jamuar, S; Davila, S; Lim, WK; Ginsburg, GS; Orlando, LA; Yeo, KK; Cook, SA; Tan, P
MLA Citation
Wu, R. Ryanne, et al. “Evaluation of family health history collection methods impact on data and risk assessment outcomes.Prev Med Rep, vol. 18, June 2020, p. 101072. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.pmedr.2020.101072.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1434803
PMID
32181122
Source
pubmed
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
18
Published Date
Start Page
101072
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2020.101072

Research Areas:

Antigens
Biological Assay
Biosensing Techniques
Cytoskeletal Proteins
Immune System
Membrane Proteins
Nucleic Acid Hybridization
Pneumonia, Viral