Geoffrey Ginsburg

Overview:

Dr. Geoffrey S. Ginsburg's research interests are in the development of novel paradigms for developing and translating genomic information into medical practice and the integration of personalized medicine into health care.

Positions:

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Cardiology
School of Medicine

Director of Duke Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine

Duke Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine
School of Medicine

Professor in Pathology

Pathology
School of Medicine

Professor in the School of Nursing

School of Nursing
School of Nursing

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1984

Boston University

Ph.D. 1984

Boston University

Medical Resident, Medicine

Children's Hospital, Boston

Fellow in Cardiology, Medicine

Children's Hospital, Boston

Grants:

Building and Deploying a Genomic-Medicine Risk Assessment Model for Diverse Primary Care Populations.

Administered By
Duke Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Investigator
Start Date
End Date

The IGNITE II CC: Engagement, Coordination, Demonstration, and Dissemination

Administered By
Duke Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

The IGNITE II CC: Engagement, Coordination, Demonstration, and Dissemination

Administered By
Duke Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

The Role of Junctophilin Type 2 in Cardiac Node Automaticity

Administered By
Pediatrics, Cardiology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Mentor
Start Date
End Date

Predicting prebiotic effects on human microbiota, behavior, and cognition.

Administered By
Molecular Genetics and Microbiology
Awarded By
Office of Naval Research
Role
Collaborator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Genomic Medicine Year in Review: 2019

Authors
Manolio, TA; Bult, CJ; Chisholm, RL; Deverka, PA; Ginsburg, GS; Jarvik, GP; McLeod, HL; Mensah, GA; Relling, MV; Roden, DM; Rowley, R; Tamburro, C; Williams, MS; Green, ED
MLA Citation
Manolio, Teri A., et al. “Genomic Medicine Year in Review: 2019.” The American Journal of Human Genetics, vol. 105, no. 6, Elsevier BV, Dec. 2019, pp. 1072–75. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.ajhg.2019.11.006.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1424507
Source
crossref
Published In
American Journal of Human Genetics
Volume
105
Published Date
Start Page
1072
End Page
1075
DOI
10.1016/j.ajhg.2019.11.006

Specific Immunologic Countermeasure Protocol for Deep-Space Exploration Missions.

Authors
Makedonas, G; Mehta, S; Choukèr, A; Simpson, RJ; Marshall, G; Orange, JS; Aunon-Chancellor, S; Smith, SM; Zwart, SR; Stowe, RP; Heer, M; Ponomarev, S; Whitmire, A; Frippiat, JP; Douglas, GL; Krieger, SS; Lorenzi, H; Buchheim, J-I; Ginsburg, GS; Ott, CM; Downs, M; Pierson, D; Baecker, N; Sams, C; Crucian, B
MLA Citation
Makedonas, George, et al. “Specific Immunologic Countermeasure Protocol for Deep-Space Exploration Missions..” Front Immunol, vol. 10, 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.3389/fimmu.2019.02407.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1417925
PMID
31681296
Source
pubmed
Published In
Frontiers in Immunology
Volume
10
Published Date
Start Page
2407
DOI
10.3389/fimmu.2019.02407

Facilitating translational team science: The project leader model.

Project management expertise is employed across many professional sectors, including clinical research organizations, to ensure that efforts undertaken by the organization are completed on time and according to specifications and are capable of achieving the needed impact. Increasingly, project leaders (PLs) who possess this expertise are being employed in academic settings to support clinical and preclinical translational research team science. Duke University's clinical and translational science enterprise has been an early adopter of project management to support clinical and preclinical programs. We review the history and evolution of project management and the PL role at Duke, examine case studies that illustrate their growing value to our academic research environment, and address challenges and solutions to employing project management in academia. Furthermore, we describe the critical role project leadership plays in accelerating and increasing the success of translational team science and team approaches frequently required for systems biology and "big data" scientific studies. Finally, we discuss perspectives from Duke project leadership professionals regarding the training needs and requirements for PLs working in academic clinical and translational science research settings.
Authors
Sutton, L; Berdan, LG; Bolte, J; Califf, RM; Ginsburg, GS; Li, JS; McCall, J; Moen, R; Myers, BS; Rodriquez, V; Veldman, T; Boulware, LE
MLA Citation
Sutton, Lynn, et al. “Facilitating translational team science: The project leader model..” J Clin Transl Sci, vol. 3, no. 4, Aug. 2019, pp. 140–46. Pubmed, doi:10.1017/cts.2019.398.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1418033
PMID
31660238
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Clinical and Translational Science
Volume
3
Published Date
Start Page
140
End Page
146
DOI
10.1017/cts.2019.398

Affiliate network members as force amplifiers of genomic medicine research.

Authors
Ginsburg, GS; Madden, E; Empey, PE
MLA Citation
Ginsburg, Geoffrey S., et al. “Affiliate network members as force amplifiers of genomic medicine research..” Per Med, vol. 16, no. 6, Nov. 2019, pp. 431–33. Pubmed, doi:10.2217/pme-2019-0077.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1421435
PMID
31709897
Source
pubmed
Published In
Per Med
Volume
16
Published Date
Start Page
431
End Page
433
DOI
10.2217/pme-2019-0077

Validation of a host response test to distinguish bacterial and viral respiratory infection.

BACKGROUND: Distinguishing bacterial and viral respiratory infections is challenging. Novel diagnostics based on differential host gene expression patterns are promising but have not been translated to a clinical platform nor extensively tested. Here, we validate a microarray-derived host response signature and explore performance in microbiology-negative and coinfection cases. METHODS: Subjects with acute respiratory illness were enrolled in participating emergency departments. Reference standard was an adjudicated diagnosis of bacterial infection, viral infection, both, or neither. An 87-transcript signature for distinguishing bacterial, viral, and noninfectious illness was measured from peripheral blood using RT-PCR. Performance characteristics were evaluated in subjects with confirmed bacterial, viral, or noninfectious illness. Subjects with bacterial-viral coinfection and microbiologically-negative suspected bacterial infection were also evaluated. Performance was compared to procalcitonin. FINDINGS: 151 subjects with microbiologically confirmed, single-etiology illness were tested, yielding AUROCs 0•85-0•89 for bacterial, viral, and noninfectious illness. Accuracy was similar to procalcitonin (88% vs 83%, p = 0•23) for bacterial vs. non-bacterial infection. Whereas procalcitonin cannot distinguish viral from non-infectious illness, the RT-PCR test had 81% accuracy in making this determination. Bacterial-viral coinfection was subdivided. Among 19 subjects with bacterial superinfection, the RT-PCR test identified 95% as bacterial, compared to 68% with procalcitonin (p = 0•13). Among 12 subjects with bacterial infection superimposed on chronic viral infection, the RT-PCR test identified 83% as bacterial, identical to procalcitonin. 39 subjects had suspected bacterial infection; the RT-PCR test identified bacterial infection more frequently than procalcitonin (82% vs 64%, p = 0•02). INTERPRETATION: The RT-PCR test offered similar diagnostic performance to procalcitonin in some subgroups but offered better discrimination in others such as viral vs. non-infectious illness and bacterial/viral coinfection. Gene expression-based tests could impact decision-making for acute respiratory illness as well as a growing number of other infectious and non-infectious diseases.
Authors
Lydon, EC; Henao, R; Burke, TW; Aydin, M; Nicholson, BP; Glickman, SW; Fowler, VG; Quackenbush, EB; Cairns, CB; Kingsmore, SF; Jaehne, AK; Rivers, EP; Langley, RJ; Petzold, E; Ko, ER; McClain, MT; Ginsburg, GS; Woods, CW; Tsalik, EL
MLA Citation
Lydon, Emily C., et al. “Validation of a host response test to distinguish bacterial and viral respiratory infection..” Ebiomedicine, vol. 48, Oct. 2019, pp. 453–61. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.ebiom.2019.09.040.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1416456
PMID
31631046
Source
pubmed
Published In
Ebiomedicine
Volume
48
Published Date
Start Page
453
End Page
461
DOI
10.1016/j.ebiom.2019.09.040

Research Areas:

Antigens
Biological Assay
Biosensing Techniques
Cytoskeletal Proteins
Immune System
Membrane Proteins
Nucleic Acid Hybridization
Pneumonia, Viral