Geoffrey Ginsburg

Overview:

Dr. Geoffrey S. Ginsburg's research interests are in the development of novel paradigms for developing and translating genomic information into medical practice and the integration of personalized medicine into health care.

Positions:

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Cardiology
School of Medicine

Director of Duke Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine

Duke Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine
School of Medicine

Professor in Pathology

Pathology
School of Medicine

Professor in the School of Nursing

School of Nursing
School of Nursing

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1984

Boston University

Ph.D. 1984

Boston University

Medical Resident, Medicine

Children's Hospital, Boston

Fellow in Cardiology, Medicine

Children's Hospital, Boston

Grants:

Transplant Infectious Diseases Interdisciplinary Research Training Grant

Administered By
Medicine, Infectious Diseases
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Mentor
Start Date
End Date

Development Of Prognostic Platelet RNA Biomarkers To Tailor Antiplatelet Therapy

Administered By
Duke Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Phase I Clinical Trial Describing the Pharmacogenomics of Aspirin

Administered By
Duke Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Building and Deploying a Genomic-Medicine Risk Assessment Model for Diverse Primary Care Populations.

Administered By
Duke Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Investigator
Start Date
End Date

The IGNITE II CC: Engagement, Coordination, Demonstration, and Dissemination

Administered By
Duke Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

High Sensitivity Troponin I Measurement in Symptomatic Outpatients With Suspected Coronary Artery Disease: Results From the Prospective Multicenter Imaging Study for Evaluation of Chest Pain (PROMISE) Study

Authors
Januzzi, JL; Suchindran, S; Coles, A; Ferencik, M; Patel, MR; Hoffmann, U; Ginsburg, GS; Douglas, PS
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1285968
Source
wos
Published In
Circulation
Volume
136
Published Date

Family health history: underused for actionable risk assessment.

Family health history (FHH) is the most useful means of assessing risk for common chronic diseases. The odds ratio for risk of developing disease with a positive FHH is frequently greater than 2, and actions can be taken to mitigate risk by adhering to screening guidelines, genetic counselling, genetic risk testing, and other screening methods. Challenges to the routine acquisition of FHH include constraints on provider time to collect data and the difficulty in accessing risk calculators. Disease-specific and broader risk assessment software platforms have been developed, many with clinical decision support and informatics interoperability, but few access patient information directly. Software that allows integration of FHH with the electronic medical record and clinical decision support capabilities has provided solutions to many of these challenges. Patient facing, electronic medical record, and web-enabled FHH platforms have been developed, and can provide greater identification of risk compared with conventional FHH ascertainment in primary care. FHH, along with cascade screening, can be an important component of population health management approaches to overall reduction of risk.
Authors
Ginsburg, GS; Wu, RR; Orlando, LA
MLA Citation
Ginsburg, Geoffrey S., et al. “Family health history: underused for actionable risk assessment..” Lancet, vol. 394, no. 10198, Aug. 2019, pp. 596–603. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(19)31275-9.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1404114
PMID
31395442
Source
pubmed
Published In
Lancet
Volume
394
Published Date
Start Page
596
End Page
603
DOI
10.1016/S0140-6736(19)31275-9

Opportunities, resources, and techniques for implementing genomics in clinical care.

Advances in technologies for assessing genomic variation and an increasing understanding of the effects of genomic variants on health and disease are driving the transition of genomics from the research laboratory into clinical care. Genomic medicine, or the use of an individual's genomic information as part of their clinical care, is increasingly gaining acceptance in routine practice, including in assessing disease risk in individuals and their families, diagnosing rare and undiagnosed diseases, and improving drug safety and efficacy. We describe the major types and measurement tools of genomic variation that are currently of clinical importance, review approaches to interpreting genomic sequence variants, identify publicly available tools and resources for genomic test interpretation, and discuss several key barriers in using genomic information in routine clinical practice.
Authors
Manolio, TA; Rowley, R; Williams, MS; Roden, D; Ginsburg, GS; Bult, C; Chisholm, RL; Deverka, PA; McLeod, HL; Mensah, GA; Relling, MV; Rodriguez, LL; Tamburro, C; Green, ED
MLA Citation
Manolio, Teri A., et al. “Opportunities, resources, and techniques for implementing genomics in clinical care..” Lancet, vol. 394, no. 10197, Aug. 2019, pp. 511–20. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(19)31140-7.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1404487
PMID
31395439
Source
pubmed
Published In
Lancet
Volume
394
Published Date
Start Page
511
End Page
520
DOI
10.1016/S0140-6736(19)31140-7

What will it take to implement genomics in practice? Lessons from the IGNITE Network.

Authors
Ginsburg, GS; Horowitz, CR; Orlando, LA
MLA Citation
Ginsburg, Geoffrey S., et al. “What will it take to implement genomics in practice? Lessons from the IGNITE Network..” Per Med, vol. 16, no. 4, July 2019, pp. 259–61. Pubmed, doi:10.2217/pme-2019-0021.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1402385
PMID
31331251
Source
pubmed
Published In
Personalized Medicine
Volume
16
Published Date
Start Page
259
End Page
261
DOI
10.2217/pme-2019-0021

T2D Genetic Risk Counseling & Testing in Primary Care

Authors
Cho, A; Vorderstrasse, A; Suchindran, S; Lucas, J; Scott, WM; Bembe, M; Baker, D; Haga, SB; Orlando, L; Trujillo, GM; Joy, SV; Ginsburg, GS
MLA Citation
Cho, Alex, et al. “T2D Genetic Risk Counseling & Testing in Primary Care.” Diabetes, vol. 62, AMER DIABETES ASSOC, 2013, pp. A196–A196.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1394124
Source
wos
Published In
Diabetes
Volume
62
Published Date
Start Page
A196
End Page
A196

Research Areas:

Antigens
Biological Assay
Biosensing Techniques
Cytoskeletal Proteins
Immune System
Membrane Proteins
Nucleic Acid Hybridization
Pneumonia, Viral