Courtney Goodwin

Overview:

Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery, Radiation Oncology, Orthopedic
Surgery, Medicine, Cancer and Molecular Biology. Director of Surgical Director for the Duke Center for Brain and Spine Metastasis, Director of Spine Oncology, Department of Neurosurgery, Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery

Neurosurgery
School of Medicine

Assistant Professor in Radiation Oncology

Radiation Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.S. 2002

University of Florida

Ph.D. 2008

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

M.D. 2010

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Internship, Neurosurgery

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Residency, Neurosurgery

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Grants:

Health Related Quality of Life Outcomes in Spinal Metastases

Administered By
Neurosurgery
Awarded By
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Pain Outcomes in Single-High Dose vs. Hypofractionated SBRT for Spinal Metastases

Administered By
Neurosurgery
Awarded By
Neurosurgery Research and Education Foundation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Extent of Resection and Spinal Stabilization and Reconstruction in Spinal Tumors

Administered By
Neurosurgery
Awarded By
Medtronic, Inc.
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

SUMOylation of PYK2 in breast cancer spinal metastases

Administered By
Neurosurgery
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

The Influence of Spinopelvic parameters on Spinal Tumor Outcomes

Administered By
Neurosurgery
Awarded By
North Carolina Spine Society
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Percutaneous Lumbar Interbody Fusion With an Expandable Titanium Cage Through Kambin's Triangle: A Case Series With Initial Clinical and Radiographic Results.

BACKGROUND: There has been an increased interest in lumbar interbody fusions through Kambin's triangle. In this study, we describe percutaneous access to the lumbar disc and insertion of an expandable titanium cage through Kambin's triangle without facetectomy. The objective of this study is to determine the feasibility as well as clinical and radiographical outcomes of completely percutaneous lumbar interbody fusion (percLIF) using an expandable titanium cage through Kambin's triangle. METHODS: A retrospective review of patients undergoing single-level percLIF for grade 1 lumbar spondylolisthesis via Kambin's triangle using an expandable titanium cage was performed. Demographic information, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), preoperative and postoperative radiographic factors, perioperative data, and complications were recorded. Fusion was assessed with 1-year postoperative computed tomography scan or lumbar spine x-ray and defined as bridging disc or posterolateral fusion without evidence of hardware fracture or perihardware lucency. RESULTS: A total of 16 patients (3 males) were included in this study. Spondylolisthesis, anterior disc height, and posterior disc height were significantly improved at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months, postoperatively (P < 0.05). ODI was significantly improved by 24.4% at 12 months postoperatively (P = 0.0036). One patient was readmitted within 30 days for pain control but otherwise there were no complications including permanent neurological injury, infection, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, or cardiac events. Fifteen (93.8%) patients had radiographic fusion at their 1-year postoperative imaging. CONCLUSION: Our initial experiences have shown that percLIF can be performed using an expandable titanium cage through Kambin's triangle with excellent radiographic and clinical results. In this series, percLIF is a safe and clinically efficacious procedure for reducing grade 1 lumbar spondylolisthesis and improving radiculopathy. This procedure is completed percutaneously without the use of an endoscope. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This study highlights improvements in outcomes of minimally invasive surgery. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: IV.
Authors
Wang, TY; Mehta, VA; Gabr, M; Sankey, EW; Bwensa, A; Rory Goodwin, C; Karikari, IO; Chi, JH; Abd-El-Barr, MM
MLA Citation
Wang, Timothy Y., et al. “Percutaneous Lumbar Interbody Fusion With an Expandable Titanium Cage Through Kambin's Triangle: A Case Series With Initial Clinical and Radiographic Results.Int J Spine Surg, vol. 15, no. 6, Dec. 2021, pp. 1121–29. Pubmed, doi:10.14444/8144.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1507215
PMID
35078885
Source
pubmed
Published In
International Journal of Spine Surgery
Volume
15
Published Date
Start Page
1121
End Page
1129
DOI
10.14444/8144

A Need for More Molecular Profiling in Brain Metastases.

As local disease control improves, the public health impact of brain metastases (BrM) continues to grow. Molecular features are frequently different between primary and metastatic tumors as a result of clonal evolution during neoplasm migration, selective pressures imposed by systemic treatments, and differences in the local microenvironment. However, biomarker information in BrM is not routinely obtained despite emerging evidence of its clinical value. We review evidence of discordance in clinically actionable biomarkers between primary tumors, extracranial metastases, and BrM. Although BrM biopsy/resection imposes clinical risks, these risks must be weighed against the potential benefits of assessing biomarkers in BrM. First, new treatment targets unique to a patient's BrM may be identified. Second, as BrM may occur late in a patient's disease course, resistance to initial targeted therapies and/or loss of previously identified biomarkers can occur by the time of occult BrM, rendering initial and other targeted therapies ineffective. Thus, current biomarker data can inform real-time treatment options. Third, biomarker information in BrM may provide useful prognostic information for patients. Appreciating the importance of biomarker analyses in BrM tissue, including how it may identify specific drivers of BrM, is critical for the development of more effective treatment strategies to improve outcomes for this growing patient population.
Authors
Shen, E; Van Swearingen, AED; Price, MJ; Bulsara, K; Verhaak, RGW; Baëta, C; Painter, BD; Reitman, ZJ; Salama, AKS; Clarke, JM; Anders, CK; Fecci, PE; Goodwin, CR; Walsh, KM
MLA Citation
Shen, Erica, et al. “A Need for More Molecular Profiling in Brain Metastases.Front Oncol, vol. 11, 2021, p. 785064. Pubmed, doi:10.3389/fonc.2021.785064.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1509906
PMID
35145903
Source
pubmed
Published In
Frontiers in Oncology
Volume
11
Published Date
Start Page
785064
DOI
10.3389/fonc.2021.785064

Corrigendum to "Non-English Primary Language Is Associated with Short-Term Outcomes After Supratentorial Tumor Resection" [World Neurosurgery 155 (2021) e484-e502].

Authors
Witt, EE; Eruchalu, CN; Dey, T; Bates, DW; Goodwin, CR; Ortega, G
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1530137
PMID
35811286
Source
pubmed
Published In
World Neurosurg
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.wneu.2022.06.048

Systemic considerations for the surgical treatment of spinal metastatic disease: a scoping literature review.

Systemic assessment is a pillar in the neurological, oncological, mechanical, and systemic (NOMS) decision-making framework for the treatment of patients with spinal metastatic disease. Despite this importance, emerging evidence relating systemic considerations to clinical outcomes following surgery for spinal metastatic disease has not been comprehensively summarised. We aimed to conduct a scoping literature review of this broad topic. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, Scopus, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science, and CINAHL databases from Jan 1, 2000, to July 31, 2021. 61 articles were included, accounting for a total of 22 335 patients. Preoperative systemic variables negatively associated with postoperative clinical outcomes included demographics (eg, older age [>60 years], Black race, male sex, low or elevated body-mass index, and smoking status), medical comorbidities (eg, cardiac, pulmonary, hepatic, renal, endocrine, vascular, and rheumatological), biochemical abnormalities (eg, hypoalbuminaemia, atypical blood cell counts, and elevated C-reactive protein concentration), low muscle mass, generalised motor weakness (American Spinal Cord Injury Association Impairment Scale grade and Frankel grade) and poor ambulation, reduced performance status, and systemic disease burden. This is the first comprehensive scoping review to broadly summarise emerging evidence relevant to the systemic assessment component of the widely used NOMS framework for spinal metastatic disease decision making. Medical, surgical, and radiation oncologists can consider these findings when prognosticating spinal metastatic disease-related surgical outcomes on the basis of patients' systemic condition. These factors might inform a shared decision-making approach with patients and their families.
Authors
MacLean, MA; Touchette, CJ; Georgiopoulos, M; Brunette-Clément, T; Abduljabbar, FH; Ames, CP; Bettegowda, C; Charest-Morin, R; Dea, N; Fehlings, MG; Gokaslan, ZL; Goodwin, CR; Laufer, I; Netzer, C; Rhines, LD; Sahgal, A; Shin, JH; Sciubba, DM; Stephens, BF; Fourney, DR; Weber, MH; AO Spine Knowledge Forum Tumor,
MLA Citation
MacLean, Mark A., et al. “Systemic considerations for the surgical treatment of spinal metastatic disease: a scoping literature review.Lancet Oncol, vol. 23, no. 7, July 2022, pp. e321–33. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/S1470-2045(22)00126-7.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1526988
PMID
35772464
Source
pubmed
Published In
Lancet Oncol
Volume
23
Published Date
Start Page
e321
End Page
e333
DOI
10.1016/S1470-2045(22)00126-7

Attitudes and trends in the use of radiolucent spinal implants: A survey of the North American Spine Society section of spinal oncology

Background: In spinal oncology, titanium implants pose several challenges including artifact on advanced imaging and therapeutic radiation perturbation. To mitigate these effects, there has been increased interest in radiolucent carbon fiber (CF) and CF-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFR-PEEK) implants as an alternative for spinal reconstruction. This study surveyed the members of the North American Spine Society (NASS) section of Spinal Oncology to query their perspectives regarding the clinical utility, current practice patterns, and recommended future directions of radiolucent spinal implants. Methods: In February 2021, an anonymous survey was administered to the physicians of the NASS section of Spinal Oncology. Participation in the survey was optional. The survey contained 38 items including demographic questions as well as multiple-choice, yes/no questions, Likert rating scales, and short free-text responses pertaining to the “clinical concept”, “efficacy”, “problems/complications”, “practice pattern”, and “future directions” of radiolucent spinal implants. Results: Fifteen responses were received (71.4% response rate). Six of the participants (40%) were neurosurgeons, eight (53.3%) were orthopedic surgeons, and one was a spinal radiation oncologist. Overall, there were mixed opinions among the specialists. While several believed that radiolucent spinal implants provide substantial benefits for the detection of disease recurrence and radiation therapy options, others remained less convinced. Ongoing concerns included high costs, low availability, limited cervical and percutaneous options, and suboptimal screw and rod designs. As such, participants estimated that they currently utilize these implants for 27.3% of anterior and 14.7% of all posterior reconstructions after tumor resection. Conclusion: A survey of the NASS section of Spinal Oncology found a lack of consensus with regards to the imaging and radiation benefits, and several ongoing concerns about currently available options. Therefore, routine utilization of these implants for anterior and posterior spinal reconstructions remains low. Future investigations are warranted to practically validate these devices’ theoretical risks and benefits.
Authors
Zavras, AG; Schoenfeld, AJ; Patt, JC; Munim, MA; Goodwin, CR; Goodwin, ML; Lo, SFL; Redmond, KJ; Tobert, DG; Shin, JH; Ferrone, ML; Laufer, I; Saifi, C; Buchowski, JM; Jennings, JW; Ozturk, AK; Huang-Wright, C; Mesfin, A; Steyn, C; Hsu, W; Soliman, HM; Krishnaney, AA; Sciubba, DM; Schwab, JH; Colman, MW
MLA Citation
Zavras, A. G., et al. “Attitudes and trends in the use of radiolucent spinal implants: A survey of the North American Spine Society section of spinal oncology.” North American Spine Society Journal, vol. 10, June 2022. Scopus, doi:10.1016/j.xnsj.2022.100105.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1517747
Source
scopus
Published In
North American Spine Society Journal
Volume
10
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.xnsj.2022.100105

Research Areas:

Bone metastasis
Ependymoma
Tumor Microenvironment
Tumor markers