Michael Harrison

Positions:

Associate Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2004

Tulane University

residency, Medicine

Tulane University

Grants:

Bladder Cancer in Older Adults - Treatment and Outcomes

Administered By
Duke Clinical Research Institute
Awarded By
AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, LP
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

ATLAS: A Phase 2, Open-label Study of Rucaparib in Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Clovis Oncology, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

STUDY/PROTOCOL TITLE AND PROTOCOL NUMBER: "A Phase II, Open-label Randomized Study of Immediate Prostatectomy vs. Cabozantinib Followed by Prostatectomy in Men with High Risk Prostate Cancer"; XL184-IST64

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Exelixis, Inc
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase 3, Open-label, Randomized Study of Nivolumab Combined with Ipilimumab, or with Standard of Care Chemotherapy, versus Standard of Care Chemotherapy in Participants with Previously Untreated Unr

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Bristol-Myers Squibb Company
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Phase II Single Arm Study of Gemcitabine and Cisplatin plus Pembrolizumab as Neoadjuvant Therapy Prior to Radical Cystectomy in Patients with Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

923P Molecular classification of cancers of unknown primary expands and refines treatment options

Authors
George, DJ; Moore, E; Blobe, GC; DeVito, N; Hanks, BA; Harrison, MR; Hoimes, CJ; Jia, J; Morse, M; Jayaprakasan, P; MacKelfresh, A; Mulder, H; Beauchamp, K; Michuda, J; Stumpe, MC; Perakslis, E; Taxter, T
MLA Citation
George, D. J., et al. “923P Molecular classification of cancers of unknown primary expands and refines treatment options.” Annals of Oncology, vol. 33, Elsevier BV, 2022, pp. S968–69. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.annonc.2022.07.1048.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1559949
Source
crossref
Published In
Annals of Oncology
Volume
33
Published Date
Start Page
S968
End Page
S969
DOI
10.1016/j.annonc.2022.07.1048

Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) on patient preferences for adjuvant treatment in muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma (MIUC): A multi-country discrete choice experiment (DCE).

<jats:p> 454 </jats:p><jats:p> Background: Patient preference is an important factor in selecting appropriate treatment choices. Although underutilized, the standard of care for MIUC is with NAC, whereas evidence for adjuvant therapy is less clear. With the introduction of novel adjuvant treatments such as immune checkpoint inhibitors, treatment options are expected to expand. This study examines whether preferences for adjuvant therapy is impacted in MIUC patients receiving NAC. Methods: A cross-sectional, web-based survey included patients ≥ 18 years old who self-reported being diagnosed with MIUC and underwent radical cystectomy or nephroureterectomy without recurrence. Patients were recruited from the US, UK, Canada, France, and Germany (May–Sep 2021). A DCE using 2 adjuvant treatment profiles included 8 attributes: cancer-free survival, overall survival (OS), hypothyroidism requiring life-long hormone therapy, risk of a serious adverse event (requiring medical intervention/possible hospitalization), nausea, fatigue, diarrhea, and a dosing regimen (frequency of treatment and monitoring); an opt-out option of no treatment was also shown. Patients were grouped according to self-reported receipt of NAC. Descriptive statistics and hierarchical Bayesian logistic model with estimated preference weights were used. Relative importance estimates (mean ± standard error), or how much the attribute ranges accounted for the variation in preferences, were computed for each attribute. Bivariate comparisons used t-tests. Results: This interim analysis identified 205 patients (70.7% of target sample; US, n = 99; Germany, n = 60; UK, n = 31; Canada, n = 14; France, n = 1). Of 82 patients (40.0%) receiving NAC, 32.7% were patients &gt; 65 years and 55.1% were male; receipt of NAC did not differ by age ( P = 0.248) or sex ( P = 0.731). Patients were willing to accept increased risk in toxicities for increased treatment efficacy. Specifically, mean relative importance of treatment attributes showed that difference in median OS (25 months compared to 78 months) was most important (34.6% ± 1.6), although less so for those who did not receive NAC (30.2% ± 2.4 vs 37.5% ± 2.0; P = 0.022). Patients chose an adjuvant treatment option over ‘no treatment’ 91% of the time, with similar findings by NAC status. Conclusions: Preliminary data indicates that receipt of NAC impacts preferences for adjuvant treatment attributes. However, regardless of these attributes, patients still preferred adjuvant treatment over none. These results suggest that providing standard of care NAC does not reduce patient preference for adjuvant therapy; rather, patient preferences for adjuvant treatment attributes vary by treatment history, with implications for improving quality of care and outcomes. </jats:p>
Authors
Broughton, EI; Steinberg, GD; Harrison, MR; Braverman, J; Jaffe, DH; Will, O; Senglaub, SS; King-Concialdi, K; Beusterien, K
MLA Citation
Broughton, Edward I., et al. “Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) on patient preferences for adjuvant treatment in muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma (MIUC): A multi-country discrete choice experiment (DCE).Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 40, no. 6_suppl, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), 2022, pp. 454–454. Crossref, doi:10.1200/jco.2022.40.6_suppl.454.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1517963
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
40
Published Date
Start Page
454
End Page
454
DOI
10.1200/jco.2022.40.6_suppl.454

Economic benefits associated with treatment-free survival of immuno-oncology agents among untreated patients with intermediate/poor-risk advanced or metastatic renal cell carcinoma

Authors
Harrison, M; Regan, M; Atkins, M; Rao, S; Yang, S; Johansen, J; Du, E; Gu, C; Fadli, E; Betts, K; McDermott, D
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1422597
Source
wos
Published In
Journal for Immunotherapy of Cancer
Volume
7
Published Date

Urologic Malignancies

Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) have revolutionized the care of urologic malignancies, in particular urothelial carcinoma (UC) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Five PD-1/PD-L1 ICIs have been approved for platinum-refractory advanced UC: atezolizumab, pembrolizumab, nivolumab, durvalumab, and avelumab. Atezolizumab and pembrolizumab have also been approved for cisplatin-ineligible advanced UC. For advanced RCC, nivolumab was the first ICI approved in the setting of prior antiangiogenic therapy. The ICI combination of nivolumab with ipilimumab has recently demonstrated improved overall response rate and overall survival in intermediate- and poor-risk patients with treatment-naïve, clear cell metastatic RCC (mRCC) and has become the standard of care. An ICI and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-targeted therapy combination, atezolizumab and bevacizumab, was randomized against sunitinib in the first-line treatment of mRCC, and this trial recently reported improvement of progression-free survival with the combination in a subset of patients. More ICI-ICI and ICI-VEGF inhibitor combinations are in clinical testing. The development of ICIs in prostate cancer has been challenging, and no ICIs are currently approved; however, progress is being made.
MLA Citation
Harrison, M. R., et al. “Urologic Malignancies.” Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Cancer, 2019, pp. 115–33. Scopus, doi:10.1016/B978-0-323-54948-6.00006-8.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1547876
Source
scopus
Published Date
Start Page
115
End Page
133
DOI
10.1016/B978-0-323-54948-6.00006-8

The Association between a Decrease in On-Treatment Neutrophil-to-Eosinophil Ratio (NER) at Week 6 after Ipilimumab Plus Nivolumab Initiation and Improved Clinical Outcomes in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

A lower baseline neutrophil-to-eosinophil ratio (NER) has been associated with improved responses to immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI)-treated metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). This study investigated the decrease in NER at week 6 after ipilimumab/nivolumab (ipi/nivo) initiation and treatment responses in mRCC. A retrospective study of ipi/nivo-treated mRCC at two US academic cancer centers was conducted. A landmark analysis at week 6 was performed to assess the association between the change in NER and clinical responses (progression-free survival (PFS)/overall survival (OS)). Week 6 NER was modeled as a continuous variable, after log transformation (Ln NER), and a categorical variable by percent change. There were 150 mRCC patients included: 78% had clear cell histology, and 78% were IMDC intermediate/poor risk. In multivariable regression analysis, every decrease of 1 unit of Ln NER at week 6 was associated with improved PFS (adjusted hazard ratio (AHR): 0.78, p-value:0.005) and OS (AHR: 0.67, p-value: 0.002). When NER was modeled by percent change, decreased NER &gt; 50% was associated with improved PFS (AHR: 0.55, p-value: 0.03) and OS (AHR: 0.37, p-value: 0.02). The decrease in week 6 NER was associated with improved PFS/OS in ipi/nivo-treated mRCC. Prospective studies are warranted to validate NER change as a biomarker to predict ICI responses.
Authors
Chen, Y-W; Tucker, MD; Brown, LC; Yasin, HA; Ancell, KK; Armstrong, AJ; Beckermann, KE; Davis, NB; Harrison, MR; Kaiser, EG; McAlister, RK; Schaffer, KR; Wallace, DE; George, DJ; Rathmell, WK; Rini, BI; Zhang, T
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1532580
PMID
35954493
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancers
Volume
14
Published Date
DOI
10.3390/cancers14153830