Matthew Hartwig

Positions:

Associate Professor of Surgery

Surgery, Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2001

Duke University

Intern

Duke University

Junior Assistant Resident

Duke University

Research Fellow

Duke University

Senior Assistant Resident

Duke University

Chief Resident

Duke University

Resident

Duke University

Chief Resident

Duke University

Grants:

Increasing Lung Transplant Availability Using Normothermic Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion (EVLP) at a Dedicated EVLP Facility

Administered By
Surgery, Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery
Awarded By
Lung Bioengineering, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase 2, Multicenter, Open Label Study To Measure Safety Donor Lungs (EVLP)

Awarded By
Lung Bioengineering, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

The Organ Care System (OCS) Lung Thoracic Organ Perfusion (TOP) Post Approval Study (PAS) Registry - OCS Lung TOP PAS Registry

Administered By
Surgery, Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery
Awarded By
TransMedics
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

TransMedics Lungs for Transplantation EXPAND II Trial

Administered By
Surgery, Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery
Awarded By
TransMedics
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Expand Trial

Awarded By
TransMedics
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome Changes in Older Non-Cardiac Surgical Patients with Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction.

BACKGROUND: Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), a syndrome of cognitive deficits occurring 1-12 months after surgery primarily in older patients, is associated with poor postoperative outcomes. POCD is hypothesized to result from neuroinflammation; however, the pathways involved remain unclear. Unbiased proteomic analyses have been used to identify neuroinflammatory pathways in multiple neurologic diseases and syndromes but have not yet been applied to POCD. OBJECTIVE: To utilize unbiased mass spectrometry-based proteomics to identify potential neuroinflammatory pathways underlying POCD. METHODS: Unbiased LC-MS/MS proteomics was performed on immunodepleted cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples obtained before, 24 hours after, and 6 weeks after major non-cardiac surgery in older adults who did (n = 8) or did not develop POCD (n = 6). Linear mixed models were used to select peptides and proteins with intensity differences for pathway analysis. RESULTS: Mass spectrometry quantified 8,258 peptides from 1,222 proteins in > 50%of patient samples at all three time points. Twelve peptides from 11 proteins showed differences in expression over time between patients with versus withoutPOCD (q < 0.05), including proteins previously implicated in neurodegenerative disease pathophysiology. Additionally, 283 peptides from 182 proteins were identified with trend-level differences (q < 0.25) in expression over time between these groups. Among these, pathway analysis revealed that 50 were from 17 proteins mapping to complement and coagulation pathways (q = 2.44*10-13). CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate the feasibility of performing unbiased mass spectrometry on perioperative CSF samples to identify pathways associated with POCD. Additionally, they provide hypothesis-generating evidence for CSF complement and coagulation pathway changes in patients with POCD.
Authors
VanDusen, KW; Li, Y-J; Cai, V; Hall, A; Hiles, S; Thompson, JW; Moseley, MA; Cooter, M; Acker, L; Levy, JH; Ghadimi, K; Quiñones, QJ; Devinney, MJ; Chung, S; Terrando, N; Moretti, EW; Browndyke, JN; Mathew, JP; Berger, M; MADCO-PC Investigators,
MLA Citation
VanDusen, Keith W., et al. “Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome Changes in Older Non-Cardiac Surgical Patients with Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction.J Alzheimers Dis, vol. 80, no. 3, 2021, pp. 1281–97. Pubmed, doi:10.3233/JAD-201544.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1475476
PMID
33682719
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Alzheimers Dis
Volume
80
Published Date
Start Page
1281
End Page
1297
DOI
10.3233/JAD-201544

Safety and efficacy of an implantable device for management of gastroesophageal reflux in lung transplant recipients

Background: Magnetic sphincter augmentation (MSA) is a promising minimally invasive surgical technique for management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD); however, device implantation after transplantation has not been studied and may be concerning in these immunosuppressed patients. We explored the safety of the LINX Reflux Management System (MSA device) for management of GERD following lung transplantation (LTx). Methods: Lung transplant recipients who underwent LINX implantation at our institution between 2017 and 2019 were followed prospectively in the Reflux Following Lung Transplantation and Associated Treatment Registry. Ambulatory pH testing and acid-suppressing medication use were compared before and after LINX implantation. One-year outcomes and change in pulmonary function were compared between matched LINX and fundoplication groups. Results: Of 17 patients who underwent post-lung transplant LINX implantation, 8 (47.1%) agreed to undergo post-LINX pH testing. Three/eight (37.5%) patients achieved normal esophageal acid exposure time; 14 (82.4%) remained on acid-suppressing medication at one-year under the direction of their transplant teams. One-year patient survival and change in pulmonary function were similar between groups. LINX patients experienced more early side effects. Conclusions: Use of the LINX MSA device in a cohort of lung transplant recipients at our institution was associated with similar short-Term safety compared to traditional fundoplication, however assessment of efficacy was limited. Further investigation is needed to characterize the long-Term efficacy of LINX implantation after LTx.
Authors
Halpern, SE; Gupta, A; Jawitz, OK; Choi, AY; Salfity, HV; Klapper, JA; Hartwig, MG
MLA Citation
Halpern, S. E., et al. “Safety and efficacy of an implantable device for management of gastroesophageal reflux in lung transplant recipients.” Journal of Thoracic Disease, vol. 13, no. 4, Apr. 2021, pp. 2116–27. Scopus, doi:10.21037/jtd-20-3276.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1481871
Source
scopus
Published In
Journal of Thoracic Disease
Volume
13
Published Date
Start Page
2116
End Page
2127
DOI
10.21037/jtd-20-3276

Center volume and primary graft dysfunction in patients undergoing lung transplantation in the United States - a cohort study.

Lung transplantation primary graft dysfunction (PGD) is common and portends poor outcomes. We examined the association of lung transplant center volume with PGD and the risk of mortality. The United Network for Organ Sharing transplant registry was queried for adult lung transplants from March 2015 to March 2019. Recipients were stratified by the occurrence of grade 3 PGD 72 h post-transplant, defined using modified ISHLT criteria. The adjusted association between volume and PGD as well as post-PGD survival was analyzed. 7322 recipients were included, among whom approximately 21% (n = 1525) experienced grade 3 PGD. After adjustment, increasing annualized lung transplant volume was associated with a decrease in the odds of PGD in a near-linear fashion (OR 0.94 per 10 transplants, 95% CI 0.89-0.99). Furthermore, increasing annualized lung transplant center volume up to approximately 55 transplants per year was associated with improved survival among patients with grade 3 PGD (HR 0.87 per 10 transplants, 95% CI 0.79-0.94). Increasing annual lung transplant center volume is associated with a decreased incidence of grade 3 PGD. Further, increasing volume among low- and medium-volume centers is associated with improved survival of patients who experience PGD.
Authors
Jawitz, OK; Raman, V; Bryner, BS; Klapper, J; Hartwig, MG
MLA Citation
Jawitz, Oliver K., et al. “Center volume and primary graft dysfunction in patients undergoing lung transplantation in the United States - a cohort study.Transpl Int, vol. 34, no. 1, Jan. 2021, pp. 194–203. Pubmed, doi:10.1111/tri.13784.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1464054
PMID
33145853
Source
pubmed
Published In
Transpl Int
Volume
34
Published Date
Start Page
194
End Page
203
DOI
10.1111/tri.13784

Commentary: Making lungs great again-introducing new modifications to the Toronto ex vivo lung perfusion protocol.

Authors
Kesseli, SJ; Davis, RP; Hartwig, MG
MLA Citation
Kesseli, Samuel J., et al. “Commentary: Making lungs great again-introducing new modifications to the Toronto ex vivo lung perfusion protocol.J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg, vol. 161, no. 6, June 2021, pp. 1974–75. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jtcvs.2020.08.016.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1460131
PMID
32891450
Source
pubmed
Published In
The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume
161
Published Date
Start Page
1974
End Page
1975
DOI
10.1016/j.jtcvs.2020.08.016

The effect of warm ischemia time on ex-vivo liver perfusion parameters in a non-human primate DCD model

Authors
Kesseli, S; Gloria, J; Halpern, S; Abraham, N; Schmitz, R; Shaw, B; Fitch, Z; Zhang, M; Zhu, M; Song, M; Guy, C; Parker, W; Hartwig, M; Barbas, A
MLA Citation
Kesseli, Samuel, et al. “The effect of warm ischemia time on ex-vivo liver perfusion parameters in a non-human primate DCD model.” American Journal of Transplantation, vol. 21, 2021, pp. 21–22.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1473615
Source
wos-lite
Published In
American Journal of Transplantation : Official Journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons
Volume
21
Published Date
Start Page
21
End Page
22