Jenny Hoang

Overview:

Dr. Jenny K. Hoang MBBS is a neuroradiologist and Associate Professor in Radiology and Radiation Oncology at Duke University, NC USA where she is the Director of Head and Neck Radiology and Chair of the Grand Rounds Committee. Her career is accentuated by her strong involvement in research and education. She led the American College of Radiology (ACR) efforts in producing a White Paper on Incidental Thyroid Findings and was a core member of the ACR TI-RADS committee for thyroid ultrasound. She also serves on the National Cancer Institute PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board.

She has published more than 110 peer-reviewed articles with a focus on thyroid and parathyroid imaging. Dr. Hoang was the recipient of GE-Radiology Research Academic Fellowship (GERRAF) Program (2010-2012) and ACR Innovations Grant (2017). She is a popular a faculty lecturer at national and international meetings. She is also actively educating and advocating on Twitter. Connect with her at @JennyKHoang.

Positions:

Associate Professor of Radiology

Radiology, Neuroradiology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.B.B.S. 1999

University of Melbourne (Australia)

Grants:

From ACR White Papers to National Guidelines: Formalizing the Consensus Process for Algorithm-Based Recommendations

Administered By
Radiology, Neuroradiology
Awarded By
American College of Radiology
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Incidental Thyroid Nodules Detected in the National Lung Screening Trial:

Administered By
Radiology
Role
Advisor
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Guidelines for Biopsy of Thyroid Nodules.

Authors
Tessler, FN; Middleton, WD; Grant, EG; Hoang, JK
MLA Citation
Tessler, Franklin N., et al. “Guidelines for Biopsy of Thyroid Nodules..” Radiology, vol. 288, no. 2, Aug. 2018, pp. 635–36. Pubmed, doi:10.1148/radiol.2018180510.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1326173
PMID
29944082
Source
pubmed
Published In
Radiology
Volume
288
Published Date
Start Page
635
End Page
636
DOI
10.1148/radiol.2018180510

Effective Radiology Reporting.

Authors
Ware, JB; Jha, S; Hoang, JK; Baker, S; Wruble, J
MLA Citation
Ware, Jeffrey B., et al. “Effective Radiology Reporting..” J Am Coll Radiol, vol. 14, no. 6, June 2017, pp. 838–39. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jacr.2017.01.045.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1250583
PMID
28434849
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of the American College of Radiology : Jacr
Volume
14
Published Date
Start Page
838
End Page
839
DOI
10.1016/j.jacr.2017.01.045

Keep "As Above" Out of the Impression.

Authors
MLA Citation
Hoang, Jenny K. “Keep "As Above" Out of the Impression..” J Am Coll Radiol, vol. 13, no. 5, May 2016. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jacr.2016.01.003.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1132118
PMID
26908393
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of the American College of Radiology : Jacr
Volume
13
Published Date
Start Page
490
DOI
10.1016/j.jacr.2016.01.003

Avoid Jargon Terms for Normal.

Authors
MLA Citation
Hoang, Jenny K. “Avoid Jargon Terms for Normal..” J Am Coll Radiol, vol. 12, no. 6, June 2015. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jacr.2015.03.018.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1075624
PMID
26047396
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of the American College of Radiology : Jacr
Volume
12
Published Date
Start Page
546
DOI
10.1016/j.jacr.2015.03.018

Effect of the CT table strap on radiation exposure and image quality during cervical spine CT.

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The CT table strap may impair shoulder lowering during cervical spine CT. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of the CT table strap on radiation exposure and image quality during CT of the cervical spine. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients undergoing cervical spine CT were prospectively randomized to having the CT table strap placed around the torso and arms (control group) or around the torso only (intervention group). Radiation exposure, shoulder position, and image quality were evaluated. Potential confounders, including neck diameter and scan length, were also assessed. RESULTS: Fifty-eight patients were enrolled and randomized, and 51 subjects were included in the final study population. There was a 21% decrease in radiation exposure in the intervention group compared with the control group (mean dose-length product, 540 ± 152 versus 686 ± 200 mGy × cm, P = .005). Subjects in the intervention group achieved shoulder lowering of an average of >1 vertebral body lower than the control group (mean shoulder level, 7.7 ± 1.3 versus 6.5 ± 1.3, P = .001). Subjective image quality, determined by the lowest level of spinal cord visibility, was also better in the intervention group (mean cord visibility level, 6.9 ± 1.3 versus 5.9 ± 1.3, P = .006). No differences in neck diameter (P = .28) or scan length (P = .55) were observed between groups. CONCLUSIONS: The CT table strap inhibits shoulder lowering during CT of the cervical spine. Placement of the patient's arms outside the CT table strap results in decreased radiation exposure and increased image quality compared with patients whose arms are placed inside the strap.
Authors
Kranz, PG; Wylie, JD; Hoang, JK; Kosinski, AS
MLA Citation
Kranz, P. G., et al. “Effect of the CT table strap on radiation exposure and image quality during cervical spine CT..” Ajnr Am J Neuroradiol, vol. 35, no. 10, Oct. 2014, pp. 1870–76. Pubmed, doi:10.3174/ajnr.A4074.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1040015
PMID
25059701
Source
pubmed
Published In
Ajnr Am J Neuroradiol
Volume
35
Published Date
Start Page
1870
End Page
1876
DOI
10.3174/ajnr.A4074

Research Areas:

Abscess
Academic Medical Centers
Age Distribution
Anesthetics, Local
Angiogenesis Inhibitors
Angiography
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Aorta, Thoracic
Aortography
Arteries
Biopsy, Fine-Needle
Body Burden
Brain Ischemia
Brain Neoplasms
Calcinosis
Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating
Carcinoma, Papillary
Carcinoma, Renal Cell
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell
Carotid Artery, Internal
Case-Control Studies
Cervical Vertebrae
Chemoradiotherapy
Circle of Willis
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Disease
Documentation
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Electrocardiography
Eponyms
Fibromuscular Dysplasia
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography
Frontal Bone
Gallstones
Glioma
Glucose
Guideline Adherence
Head and Neck Neoplasms
Health Care Surveys
Hyperparathyroidism, Primary
Hyperthyroidism
Image Enhancement
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Immunohistochemistry
Incidental Findings
Injections
Injections, Epidural
Injections, Intra-Arterial
Injections, Intralesional
Injections, Intravenous
Jugular Veins
Kidney Neoplasms
Lymph Nodes
Lymphatic Metastasis
Magnetic Resonance Angiography
Mammography
Mastoiditis
Myelography
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms
Neck
Nerve Block
Observer Variation
Oligodendroglioma
Organ Size
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Parathyroid Neoplasms
Parotid Gland
Patient Safety
Petrous Bone
Phantoms, Imaging
Physician's Practice Patterns
Pneumonectomy
Positron-Emission Tomography
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Practice Patterns, Physicians'
Pulmonary Artery
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Protection
Radiculopathy
Radiographic Image Enhancement
Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted
Radiology
Radiotherapy, Conformal
Respiratory-Gated Imaging Techniques
Retropharyngeal Abscess
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Spinal Nerve Roots
Staphylococcal Infections
Statistics, Nonparametric
Streptococcal Infections
Stroke
Syndrome
Thrombophlebitis
Thyroid Diseases
Thyroid Gland
Thyroid Neoplasms
Thyroid Nodule
Thyroidectomy
Tomography, Spiral Computed
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Triiodobenzoic Acids
Tumor Burden
Ultrasonography
Young Adult