Mitchell Horwitz

Overview:

Allogeneic stem cell transplantation using umbilical cord blood grafts; Allogenic stem cell transplantation for Sickle Cell Disease; Prevention of acute graft versus host disease through donor stem cell graft manipulation; Improving immune recovery following alternative donor stem cell transplantation using donor graft manipulation or third party thymus transplantation.

Positions:

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Affiliate of the Regeneration Next Initiative

Regeneration Next Initiative
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1992

Rush University

Medical Resident, Medicine

Northwestern University

Grants:

A Phase 2/3, Multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of Alpha-! Antitrypsin for the Prevention of GVHD

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
CSL Behring LLC
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A phase III Randomized Open-Label Multi-Center study of ruxolitinib vs. best available therapy in patients with corticosteroid-refractory chronic graft vs host disease after allogenic stem cell transplantation

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Incyte Corporation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Blinded, Prospective Non-Interventional Observational Study for the Evaluation of a GVHD Negative Outcome Score (GNOS) in Matched Unrelated or Haploidentical Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Washington University in St. Louis
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Multicenter, Randomized, Phase III Registratoin Trial of Transplantation of NiCord, Ex Vivo Expanded, Umbilical Cord Blood-derived, Stem and Progenitor Cells, versus Unmanipulated Umbilical Cord Blood for patients with Hematological Malignancies

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Gamida Cell Ltd
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

BMT CTN Protocol 1501

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Marrow Donor Program
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Phase I dose escalation study of naive T-cell depleted donor lymphocyte infusion following allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

Prophylactic donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI) are used to augment post-transplant immune recovery to reduce both infectious complications and disease recurrence. Preclinical studies implicate the naive T-cell subset as the primary driver of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). In this phase I dose escalation study, we assessed the safety of a DLI that was depleted of CD45RA+ naive T cells. Sixteen adult patients received a prophylactic DLI at a median of 113 days (range 76-280 days) following an HLA-identical, non-myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Three patients each received the naive T-cell depleted DLI with a CD3+ dose of 1 × 105/kg, 1 × 106/kg, and 5 × 106/kg. The maximum dose of 1 × 107/kg was expanded to 7 patients. No dose-limiting grade III/IV acute GvHD or adverse events attributable to the DLI were observed at any dose level. One patient developed grade 2 acute GvHD of skin and upper intestines, and another developed moderate chronic GvHD of the lungs following the DLI. With a median follow-up of 2.8 years, 2-year progression-free and overall survival is 50.0% and 68.8%, respectively. In conclusion, these data suggest that a DLI that has been depleted of CD45RA+ naive T cells is feasible and carries a low risk of acute or chronic GvHD.
Authors
Maung, KK; Chen, BJ; Barak, I; Li, Z; Rizzieri, DA; Gasparetto, C; Sullivan, KM; Long, GD; Engemann, AM; Waters-Pick, B; Nichols, KR; Lopez, R; Kang, Y; Sarantopoulos, S; Sung, AD; Chao, NJ; Horwitz, ME
MLA Citation
Maung, Ko K., et al. “Phase I dose escalation study of naive T-cell depleted donor lymphocyte infusion following allogeneic stem cell transplantation.Bone Marrow Transplant, July 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41409-020-0991-5.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1450672
PMID
32624583
Source
pubmed
Published In
Bone Marrow Transplant
Published Date
DOI
10.1038/s41409-020-0991-5

Guidelines for Cord Blood Unit Thaw and Infusion.

Authors
Scaradavou, A; Avecilla, ST; Tonon, J; Politikos, I; Horwitz, ME; Kurtzberg, J; Milano, F; Barker, JN; American Society for Transplantation and Cellular Therapy Cord Blood Special Interest Group,
MLA Citation
Scaradavou, Andromachi, et al. “Guidelines for Cord Blood Unit Thaw and Infusion.Biol Blood Marrow Transplant, June 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.bbmt.2020.06.018.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1451132
PMID
32599214
Source
pubmed
Published In
Biol Blood Marrow Transplant
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.bbmt.2020.06.018

Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, Version 2.2020, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology

Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) involves the infusion of hematopoietic progenitor cells into patients with hematologic disorders with the goal of re-establishing normal hematopoietic and immune function. HCT is classified as autologous or allogeneic based on the origin of hematopoietic cells. Autologous HCT uses the patient's own cells while allogeneic HCT uses hematopoietic cells from a human leukocyte antigen-compatible donor. Allogeneic HCT is a potentially curative treatment option for patients with certain types of hematologic malignancies, and autologous HCT is primarily used to support patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy. Advances in HCT methods and supportive care in recent decades have led to improved survival after HCT; however, disease relapse and posttransplant complications still commonly occur in both autologous and allogeneic HCT recipients. Allogeneic HCT recipients may also develop acute and/or chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), which results in immune-mediated cellular injury of several organs. The NCCN Guidelines for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation focus on recommendations for pretransplant recipient evaluation and the management of GVHD in adult patients with malignant disease.
Authors
Saad, A; de Lima, M; Anand, S; Bhatt, VR; Bookout, R; Chen, G; Couriel, D; Di Stasi, A; El-Jawahri, A; Giralt, S; Gutman, J; Ho, V; Horwitz, M; Hsu, J; Juckett, M; Kharfan-Dabaja, MA; Loren, A; Meade, J; Mielcarek, M; Moreira, J; Nakamura, R; Nieto, Y; Roddy, J; Satyanarayana, G; Schroeder, M; Tan, CR; Tzachanis, D; Burn, J; Pluchino, L
MLA Citation
Saad, Ayman, et al. “Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, Version 2.2020, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.” J Natl Compr Canc Netw, vol. 18, no. 5, May 2020, pp. 599–634. Pubmed, doi:10.6004/jnccn.2020.0021.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1442971
PMID
32519831
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Natl Compr Canc Netw
Volume
18
Published Date
Start Page
599
End Page
634
DOI
10.6004/jnccn.2020.0021

Successful Engraftment of Umbilical Cord Blood (UCB) Cells after Co-Transplantation of Nicord (R) (Ex Vivo Expanded UCB Progenitor Cells with Nicotinamide) and an Unmanipulated UCB Unit after Myeloablative Chemotherapy in Severe Sickle Cell Disease

Authors
Parikh, S; Brochstein, J; Martin, PL; Horwitz, ME; Galamidi, E; Peleg, I; Goshen, U; Schwarzbach, A; Snyder, D; Peled, T; Kurtzberg, J
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1452357
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation : Journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Volume
23
Published Date
Start Page
S150
End Page
S151

Polyoma Virus Is The Principal Cause Of Cystitis Following Alemtuzumab-Based Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

Authors
Khan, T; Richard, K; Broadwater, G; Hemphill, SE; Lassiter, M; Horwitz, ME
MLA Citation
Khan, T., et al. “Polyoma Virus Is The Principal Cause Of Cystitis Following Alemtuzumab-Based Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.” Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, vol. 16, no. 2, Elsevier BV, 2010, pp. S319–S319. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.bbmt.2009.12.487.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1452358
Source
crossref
Published In
Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation : Journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Volume
16
Published Date
Start Page
S319
End Page
S319
DOI
10.1016/j.bbmt.2009.12.487