Shiao-Wen David Hsu

Positions:

Associate Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

William Dalton Family Assistant Professor of Medical Oncology, in the School of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2001

University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

Medical Resident, Medicine

University of Texas at Dallas

Fellow in Hematology-Oncology, Medicine

Duke University

Grants:

Identifying gene-environment interactions that confer metabolic vulnerabilities in cancer

Administered By
Pharmacology & Cancer Biology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Collaborator
Start Date
End Date

Targeting KRAS (G12C) Mutant in Colorectal Cancer

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Awarded By
Amgen, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Determining the Efficacy of Liposomal Gemcitabine in Patient Derived Xenografts (PDXs)

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Awarded By
FUJIFILM Pharmaceuticals U.S.A.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Targeting the TK1 receptor in colorectal and lung PDX using CarT cell and Motorcar cell

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Awarded By
Thunder Biotech
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Targeting Calreticulin in Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastasis

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Adjuvant chemotherapy for t1 node-positive colon cancers provides significant survival benefit.

BACKGROUND: Contemporary treatment of node-positive (N+) colon cancer consists of adjuvant chemotherapy; however, randomized data supporting this practice were derived from lesions T2 or greater. Minimal data exist regarding the use and need for adjuvant chemotherapy in T1N+ disease. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine treatment trends and the effects of adjuvant chemotherapy on T1N+ colon cancers by using the National Cancer Database. DESIGN: This was a retrospective study. Baseline demographics, tumor, and cancer treatment characteristics were compared. Groups were matched on the propensity to receive chemotherapy. Adjusted long-term survival stratified by chemotherapy use was compared by using the Kaplan-Meier method with the log-rank test. Predictors of not receiving chemotherapy were identified by using a multivariable logistic regression model. SETTINGS: Data were collected from the National Cancer Database, which collects cancer data from over 1500 cancer centers. PATIENTS: We identified patients from 1998 to 2006 with T1N+ disease, excluding those with metastatic disease or previous cancer. Patients were stratified based on whether or not they received chemotherapy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measure of this study was long-term survival. RESULTS: Three thousand one hundred thirty-seven patients had T1N+ disease; 70.6% (n = 2216) received chemotherapy, and utilization significantly increased from 1998 to 2011 (p < 0.001). Unadjusted analysis revealed that patients treated with chemotherapy were statistically younger and healthier, and had shorter postoperative lengths of stay (all p < 0.001). Unadjusted 5-year survival was higher in patients receiving chemotherapy (87.9% vs 63.0% in patients with no chemotherapy; p < 0.001) and this persisted after propensity matching with (83.4% and 63.0% in patients with or without chemotherapy; p < 0.001). Only age (OR, 0.29; p < 0.001) predicted not receiving chemotherapy. LIMITATIONS: Limitations include potential selection bias as well as the inability to compare disease-free survival/recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: Adjuvant chemotherapy appears to significantly improve long-term survival in patients receiving chemotherapy in T1N+ disease. Thus, the use of chemotherapy in T1N+ disease is justified and provides a highly significant survival benefit.
Authors
Ganapathi, AM; Speicher, PJ; Englum, BR; Castleberry, AW; Migaly, J; Hsu, DS; Mantyh, CR
MLA Citation
Ganapathi, Asvin M., et al. “Adjuvant chemotherapy for t1 node-positive colon cancers provides significant survival benefit.Dis Colon Rectum, vol. 57, no. 12, Dec. 2014, pp. 1341–48. Pubmed, doi:10.1097/DCR.0000000000000245.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1049452
PMID
25379998
Source
pubmed
Published In
Dis Colon Rectum
Volume
57
Published Date
Start Page
1341
End Page
1348
DOI
10.1097/DCR.0000000000000245

A methodology for utilization of predictive genomic signatures in FFPE samples.

BACKGROUND: Gene expression signatures developed to measure the activity of oncogenic signaling pathways have been used to dissect the heterogeneity of tumor samples and to predict sensitivity to various cancer drugs that target components of the relevant pathways, thus potentially identifying therapeutic options for subgroups of patients. To facilitate broad use, including in a clinical setting, the ability to generate data from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues is essential. METHODS: Patterns of pathway activity in matched fresh-frozen and FFPE xenograft tumor samples were generated using the MessageAmp Premier methodology in combination with assays using Affymetrix arrays. Results generated were compared with those obtained from fresh-frozen samples using a standard Affymetrix assay. In addition, gene expression data from patient matched fresh-frozen and FFPE melanomas were also utilized to evaluate the consistency of predictions of oncogenic signaling pathway status. RESULTS: Significant correlation was observed between pathway activity predictions from paired fresh-frozen and FFPE xenograft tumor samples. In addition, significant concordance of pathway activity predictions was also observed between patient matched fresh-frozen and FFPE melanomas. CONCLUSIONS: Reliable and consistent predictions of oncogenic pathway activities can be obtained from FFPE tumor tissue samples. The ability to reliably utilize FFPE patient tumor tissue samples for genomic analyses will lead to a better understanding of the biology of disease progression and, in the clinical setting, will provide tools to guide the choice of therapeutics to those most likely to be effective in treating a patient's disease.
Authors
Freedman, JA; Augustine, CK; Selim, AM; Holshausen, KC; Wei, Z; Tsamis, KA; Hsu, DS; Dressman, HK; Barry, WT; Tyler, DS; Nevins, JR
MLA Citation
Freedman, Jennifer A., et al. “A methodology for utilization of predictive genomic signatures in FFPE samples.Bmc Med Genomics, vol. 4, July 2011, p. 58. Pubmed, doi:10.1186/1755-8794-4-58.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub758438
PMID
21745407
Source
pubmed
Published In
Bmc Medical Genomics
Volume
4
Published Date
Start Page
58
DOI
10.1186/1755-8794-4-58

Age-specific differences in oncogenic pathway deregulation seen in human breast tumors.

PURPOSE: To define the biology driving the aggressive nature of breast cancer arising in young women. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Among 784 patients with early stage breast cancer, using prospectively-defined, age-specific cohorts (young <or=45 years; older >or=65 years), 411 eligible patients (n = 200<or=45 years; n = 211>or=65 years) with clinically-annotated Affymetrix microarray data were identified. GSEA, signatures of oncogenic pathway deregulation and predictors of chemotherapy sensitivity were evaluated within the two age-defined cohorts. RESULTS: In comparing deregulation of oncogenic pathways between age groups, a higher probability of PI3K (p = 0.006) and Myc (p = 0.03) pathway deregulation was observed in breast tumors arising in younger women. When evaluating unique patterns of pathway deregulation, a low probability of Src and E2F deregulation in tumors of younger women, concurrent with a higher probability of PI3K, Myc, and beta-catenin, conferred a worse prognosis (HR = 4.15). In contrast, a higher probability of Src and E2F pathway activation in tumors of older women, with concurrent low probability of PI3K, Myc and beta-catenin deregulation, was associated with poorer outcome (HR = 2.7). In multivariate analyses, genomic clusters of pathway deregulation illustrate prognostic value. CONCLUSION: Results demonstrate that breast cancer arising in young women represents a distinct biologic entity characterized by unique patterns of deregulated signaling pathways that are prognostic, independent of currently available clinico-pathologic variables. These results should enable refinement of targeted treatment strategies in this clinically challenging situation.
Authors
Anders, CK; Acharya, CR; Hsu, DS; Broadwater, G; Garman, K; Foekens, JA; Zhang, Y; Wang, Y; Marcom, K; Marks, JR; Mukherjee, S; Nevins, JR; Blackwell, KL; Potti, A
MLA Citation
Anders, Carey K., et al. “Age-specific differences in oncogenic pathway deregulation seen in human breast tumors.Plos One, vol. 3, no. 1, Jan. 2008, p. e1373. Pubmed, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0001373.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub760985
PMID
18167534
Source
pubmed
Published In
Plos One
Volume
3
Published Date
Start Page
e1373
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0001373

Phase I study of capecitabine, oxaliplatin, bevacizumab, and everolimus in advanced solid tumors.

PURPOSE: To define maximum tolerated dose (MTD), toxicities, and pharmacodynamics of capecitabine, oxaliplatin, bevacizumab, and everolimus in advanced solid tumor patients. DESIGN: This was a standard "3 + 3" dose-escalation trial. All subjects received bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg on day 1 of each cycle. Doses for capecitabine, oxaliplatin and everolimus were modified per dose limiting toxicity (DLT). Baseline and on-treatment plasma biomarkers were analyzed. Archived tumor mRNA levels were evaluated for NRP1, NRP2 and VEGF-A isoforms. RESULTS: Twenty-nine patients were evaluable for toxicity and 30 for efficacy. Two DLTs were observed in cohort 1 and one DLT each was observed in cohort -1 and -1b. Grade ≥3 toxicities included neutropenia, hypertension, perforation/fistula/hemorrhage, hypertriglyceridemia, diarrhea, and thromboembolism. Twelve subjects experienced partial response (PR); 12 had stable disease as best response. Three of seven chemorefractory metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) subjects experienced PR; 8 of 15 chemonaive mCRC subjects experienced PR. Plasma TβRIII and IL-6 increased on treatment but without correlation to outcome. Increased VEGF165 levels significantly correlated with longer progression free survival. CONCLUSIONS: Everolimus with full dose capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab had unacceptable toxicity. MTD was: everolimus 5 mg daily; capecitabine 680 mg/m(2) BID days 1-14; oxaliplatin 100 mg/m(2) and bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg, day 1. Activity was noted in mCRC.
Authors
Rangwala, F; Bendell, JC; Kozloff, MF; Arrowood, CC; Dellinger, A; Meadows, J; Tourt-Uhlig, S; Murphy, J; Meadows, KL; Starr, A; Broderick, S; Brady, JC; Cushman, SM; Morse, MA; Uronis, HE; Hsu, SD; Zafar, SY; Wallace, J; Starodub, AN; Strickler, JH; Pang, H; Nixon, AB; Hurwitz, HI
MLA Citation
Rangwala, Fatima, et al. “Phase I study of capecitabine, oxaliplatin, bevacizumab, and everolimus in advanced solid tumors.Invest New Drugs, vol. 32, no. 4, Aug. 2014, pp. 700–09. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s10637-014-0089-2.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1027394
PMID
24711126
Source
pubmed
Published In
Invest New Drugs
Volume
32
Published Date
Start Page
700
End Page
709
DOI
10.1007/s10637-014-0089-2

Antihelminth compound niclosamide downregulates Wnt signaling and elicits antitumor responses in tumors with activating APC mutations.

Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation caused by adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutations occurs in approximately 80% of sporadic colorectal cancers (CRC). The antihelminth compound niclosamide downregulates components of the Wnt pathway, specifically Dishevelled-2 (Dvl2) expression, resulting in diminished downstream β-catenin signaling. In this study, we determined whether niclosamide could inhibit the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in human CRCs and whether its inhibition might elicit antitumor effects in the presence of APC mutations. We found that niclosamide inhibited Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation, downregulated Dvl2, decreased downstream β-catenin signaling, and exerted antiproliferative effects in human colon cancer cell lines and CRC cells isolated by surgical resection of metastatic disease, regardless of mutations in APC. In contrast, inhibition of NF-κB or mTOR did not exert similar antiproliferative effects in these CRC model systems. In mice implanted with human CRC xenografts, orally administered niclosamide was well tolerated, achieved plasma and tumor levels associated with biologic activity, and led to tumor control. Our findings support clinical explorations to reposition niclosamide for the treatment of CRC.
Authors
Osada, T; Chen, M; Yang, XY; Spasojevic, I; Vandeusen, JB; Hsu, D; Clary, BM; Clay, TM; Chen, W; Morse, MA; Lyerly, HK
MLA Citation
Osada, Takuya, et al. “Antihelminth compound niclosamide downregulates Wnt signaling and elicits antitumor responses in tumors with activating APC mutations.Cancer Res, vol. 71, no. 12, June 2011, pp. 4172–82. Pubmed, doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-10-3978.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub764958
PMID
21531761
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Res
Volume
71
Published Date
Start Page
4172
End Page
4182
DOI
10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-10-3978