Jiaoti Huang

Overview:

I am a physician-scientist with clinical expertise in the pathologic diagnosis of genitourinary tumors including tumors of the prostate, bladder, kidney and testis. Another area of interest is gynecologic tumors. In my research laboratory we study prostate cancer, focusing on molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis and tumor progression, as well as biomarkers, imaging and novel therapeutic strategies. In addition to patient care and research, I am also passionate about education. I have trained numerous residents, fellows, graduate students and postdocs.

Positions:

Endowed Department Chair of Pathology

Pathology
School of Medicine

Professor of Pathology

Pathology
School of Medicine

Chair

Pathology
School of Medicine

Professor of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology

Pharmacology & Cancer Biology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1983

Anhui Medical University (China)

Ph.D. 1991

New York University

Grants:

Histologic and Immunohistochemical Biomarkers for Heavily Treated Metastatic Prostate Cancer

Administered By
Pathology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Confirmation of histologic SCNC (NEPC)

Administered By
Pathology
Awarded By
BioXcel Therapeutics
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Assessment of macrophage density in historical tNEPC tissue samples.

Administered By
Pathology
Awarded By
BioXcel Therapeutics
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Targeting Adaptive Pathways in Abiraterone- and Enzalutamide-Refractory Intermediate Atypical Carcinoma

Administered By
Pathology
Awarded By
University of California - San Francisco
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Identification of DNA methylation markers for risk of metastasis in localized prostate cancer

Administered By
Pathology
Awarded By
Kaiser Permanente
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

PD-L1 Assay Concordance in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma and Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma.

BACKGROUND: Immune checkpoint inhibitors are now standard of care for many patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) and metastatic urothelial carcinoma (mUC). Given real-world limitations in programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) testing, concordance studies between PD-L1 assays are needed. We undertook comparisons of Dako 28-8 and Ventana SP142 assays in mRCC and Dako 22C3 and Ventana SP263 assays in mUC. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty-two patients with mRCC and 18 patients with mUC who had received immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy were identified. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples for patients with mRCC were evaluated with Dako 28-8 and Ventana SP142 PD-L1 immunohistochemistry assays. For patients with mUC, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples were evaluated with Dako 22C3 and Ventana SP263 PD-L1 immunohistochemistry assays. RESULTS: The majority (29/32; 91%) of mRCC cases were concordant between assays. The majority (17/18; 94%) of mUC cases were also concordant between assays. CONCLUSIONS: There was strong concordance between PD-L1 assays chosen for comparison in both mRCC and mUC, with similar performance characteristics. One limitation is the small number of cases in this study; larger comparison studies are needed for this biomarker in mRCC and mUC.
Authors
Brown, LC; Zhu, J; Labriola, MK; Wu, Y; Cheris, S; Liu, X; Perkinson, K; Su, Z; McCall, S; Huang, J; Foo, W-C; Gupta, RT; Armstrong, AJ; George, DJ; Harrison, MR; Zhang, T
MLA Citation
Brown, Landon C., et al. “PD-L1 Assay Concordance in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma and Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma.Clin Genitourin Cancer, Apr. 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.clgc.2020.03.020.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1446670
PMID
32482566
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clin Genitourin Cancer
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.clgc.2020.03.020

MP21-16 3T MULTI-PARAMETRIC MRI PERFORMANCE IN PROSTATE CANCER DETECTION: PERIPHERAL ZONE TUMORS VS. TRANSITIONAL ZONE

Authors
Asvadi, N; Khoshnoodi, P; Alcala, H; Moshksar, A; Margolis, D; Sisk, A; Huang, J; Reiter, R; Raman, S
MLA Citation
Asvadi, Nazanin, et al. “MP21-16 3T MULTI-PARAMETRIC MRI PERFORMANCE IN PROSTATE CANCER DETECTION: PERIPHERAL ZONE TUMORS VS. TRANSITIONAL ZONE.” Journal of Urology, vol. 195, no. 4S, Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health), 2016. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.juro.2016.02.650.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1299078
Source
crossref
Published In
The Journal of Urology
Volume
195
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.juro.2016.02.650

MP18-11 MR-GUIDED FOCAL LASER ABLATION OF INTERMEDIATE RISK PROSTATE CANCER: PHASE I TRIAL

Authors
Natarajan, S; Raman, S; Priester, A; Garritano, J; Margolis, D; Lieu, P; Macairan, M; Huang, J; Grundfest, W; Marks, L
MLA Citation
Natarajan, Shyam, et al. “MP18-11 MR-GUIDED FOCAL LASER ABLATION OF INTERMEDIATE RISK PROSTATE CANCER: PHASE I TRIAL.” Journal of Urology, vol. 195, no. 4S, Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health), 2016. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.juro.2016.02.2712.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1299080
Source
crossref
Published In
The Journal of Urology
Volume
195
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.juro.2016.02.2712

The DNA methylation landscape of advanced prostate cancer.

Although DNA methylation is a key regulator of gene expression, the comprehensive methylation landscape of metastatic cancer has never been defined. Through whole-genome bisulfite sequencing paired with deep whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing of 100 castration-resistant prostate metastases, we discovered alterations affecting driver genes that were detectable only with integrated whole-genome approaches. Notably, we observed that 22% of tumors exhibited a novel epigenomic subtype associated with hypermethylation and somatic mutations in TET2, DNMT3B, IDH1 and BRAF. We also identified intergenic regions where methylation is associated with RNA expression of the oncogenic driver genes AR, MYC and ERG. Finally, we showed that differential methylation during progression preferentially occurs at somatic mutational hotspots and putative regulatory regions. This study is a large integrated study of whole-genome, whole-methylome and whole-transcriptome sequencing in metastatic cancer that provides a comprehensive overview of the important regulatory role of methylation in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.
Authors
Zhao, SG; Chen, WS; Li, H; Foye, A; Zhang, M; Sjöström, M; Aggarwal, R; Playdle, D; Liao, A; Alumkal, JJ; Das, R; Chou, J; Hua, JT; Barnard, TJ; Bailey, AM; Chow, ED; Perry, MD; Dang, HX; Yang, R; Moussavi-Baygi, R; Zhang, L; Alshalalfa, M; Laura Chang, S; Houlahan, KE; Shiah, Y-J; Beer, TM; Thomas, G; Chi, KN; Gleave, M; Zoubeidi, A; Reiter, RE; Rettig, MB; Witte, O; Yvonne Kim, M; Fong, L; Spratt, DE; Morgan, TM; Bose, R; Huang, FW; Li, H; Chesner, L; Shenoy, T; Goodarzi, H; Asangani, IA; Sandhu, S; Lang, JM; Mahajan, NP; Lara, PN; Evans, CP; Febbo, P; Batzoglou, S; Knudsen, KE; He, HH; Huang, J; Zwart, W; Costello, JF; Luo, J; Tomlins, SA; Wyatt, AW; Dehm, SM; Ashworth, A; Gilbert, LA; Boutros, PC; Farh, K; Chinnaiyan, AM; Maher, CA; Small, EJ; Quigley, DA; Feng, FY
MLA Citation
Zhao, Shuang G., et al. “The DNA methylation landscape of advanced prostate cancer.Nat Genet, vol. 52, no. 8, Aug. 2020, pp. 778–89. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41588-020-0648-8.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1451641
PMID
32661416
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nat Genet
Volume
52
Published Date
Start Page
778
End Page
789
DOI
10.1038/s41588-020-0648-8

Genomic Hallmarks and Structural Variation in Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

Authors
Quigley, DA; Dang, HX; Zhao, SG; Lloyd, P; Aggarwal, R; Alumkal, JJ; Foye, A; Kothari, V; Perry, MD; Bailey, AM; Playdle, D; Barnard, TJ; Zhang, L; Zhang, J; Youngren, JF; Cieslik, MP; Parolia, A; Beer, TM; Thomas, G; Chi, KN; Gleave, M; Lack, NA; Zoubeidi, A; Reiter, RE; Rettig, MB; Witte, O; Ryan, CJ; Fong, L; Kim, W; Friedlander, T; Chou, J; Li, H; Das, R; Li, H; Moussavi-Baygi, R; Goodarzi, H; Gilbert, LA; Lara, PN; Evans, CP; Goldstein, TC; Stuart, JM; Tomlins, SA; Spratt, DE; Cheetham, RK; Cheng, DT; Farh, K; Gehring, JS; Hakenberg, J; Liao, A; Febbo, PG; Shon, J; Sickler, B; Batzoglou, S; Knudsen, KE; He, HH; Huang, J; Wyatt, AW; Dehm, SM; Ashworth, A; Chinnaiyan, AM; Maher, CA; Small, EJ; Feng, FY
MLA Citation
Quigley, David A., et al. “Genomic Hallmarks and Structural Variation in Metastatic Prostate Cancer.Cell, vol. 175, no. 3, Oct. 2018, p. 889. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.cell.2018.10.019.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1443435
PMID
30340047
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cell
Volume
175
Published Date
Start Page
889
DOI
10.1016/j.cell.2018.10.019