Terry Hyslop

Positions:

Professor of Biostatistics & Bioinformatics

Biostatistics & Bioinformatics
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 2001

Temple University

Grants:

Combined breast MRI/biomarker strategies to identify aggressive biology

Administered By
Integrative Genomics
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Combined breast MRI/biomarker strategies to identify aggressive biology

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Biostatistician
Start Date
End Date

Tension-Stat3-miR-mediated metastasis

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Awarded By
University of California - San Francisco
Role
Biostatistician
Start Date
End Date

Smartphone Enabled Point-of-Care Detection of Serum Markers of Liver Cancer

Administered By
Biomedical Engineering
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Smartphone Enabled Point-of-Care Detection of Serum Markers of Liver Cancer

Administered By
Biomedical Engineering
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Microscaled proteogenomic methods for precision oncology.

Cancer proteogenomics promises new insights into cancer biology and treatment efficacy by integrating genomics, transcriptomics and protein profiling including modifications by mass spectrometry (MS). A critical limitation is sample input requirements that exceed many sources of clinically important material. Here we report a proteogenomics approach for core biopsies using tissue-sparing specimen processing and microscaled proteomics. As a demonstration, we analyze core needle biopsies from ERBB2 positive breast cancers before and 48-72 h after initiating neoadjuvant trastuzumab-based chemotherapy. We show greater suppression of ERBB2 protein and both ERBB2 and mTOR target phosphosite levels in cases associated with pathological complete response, and identify potential causes of treatment resistance including the absence of ERBB2 amplification, insufficient ERBB2 activity for therapeutic sensitivity despite ERBB2 amplification, and candidate resistance mechanisms including androgen receptor signaling, mucin overexpression and an inactive immune microenvironment. The clinical utility and discovery potential of proteogenomics at biopsy-scale warrants further investigation.
Authors
Satpathy, S; Jaehnig, EJ; Krug, K; Kim, B-J; Saltzman, AB; Chan, DW; Holloway, KR; Anurag, M; Huang, C; Singh, P; Gao, A; Namai, N; Dou, Y; Wen, B; Vasaikar, SV; Mutch, D; Watson, MA; Ma, C; Ademuyiwa, FO; Rimawi, MF; Schiff, R; Hoog, J; Jacobs, S; Malovannaya, A; Hyslop, T; Clauser, KR; Mani, DR; Perou, CM; Miles, G; Zhang, B; Gillette, MA; Carr, SA; Ellis, MJ
MLA Citation
Satpathy, Shankha, et al. “Microscaled proteogenomic methods for precision oncology.Nat Commun, vol. 11, no. 1, Jan. 2020, p. 532. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14381-2.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1428879
PMID
31988290
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nature Communications
Volume
11
Published Date
Start Page
532
DOI
10.1038/s41467-020-14381-2

Breast cancer in Tanzanian, black American, and white American women: An assessment of prognostic and predictive features, including tumor infiltrating lymphocytes.

<h4>Introduction</h4>Breast cancer is a major cause of morbidity and mortality for women in Sub-Saharan Africa and for black American women. There is evidence that the pathologic characteristics of breast cancers in both African women and black American women may differ from their counterparts of European ancestry. However, despite the great burden of disease, data on pathologic features of breast carcinoma in Sub-Saharan Africa is limited and often contradictory. This lack of information makes it difficult to prioritize resource use in efforts to improve breast cancer outcomes in the region.<h4>Methods</h4>We examined consecutive cases of breast cancer in Tanzanian women (n = 83), black American women (n = 120), and white American women (n = 120). Each case was assessed for tumor type, grade, mitotic count, ER and HER2 status, and tumor infiltrating lymphocyte involvement.<h4>Results</h4>The Tanzanian subjects were younger and had higher stage tumors than the subjects in either American group. Breast cancers in the Tanzanian and black American groups were more likely to be high grade (p = 0.008), to have a high mitotic rate (p<0.0001), and to be ER-negative (p<0.001) than the tumors in the white American group. Higher levels of tumor infiltrating lymphocyte involvement were seen among Tanzanian and black American subjects compared to white American subjects (p = 0.0001). Among all subjects, tumor infiltrating lymphocyte levels were higher in tumors with a high mitotic rate. Among Tanzanian and black American subjects, tumor infiltrating lymphocyte levels were higher in ER-negative tumors. These findings have implications for treatment priorities for breast cancer in Tanzania and other Sub-Saharan African countries.
Authors
Mremi, A; Broadwater, G; Jackson, K; Amsi, P; Mbulwa, C; Hyslop, T; Ong, C; Hall, A
MLA Citation
Mremi, Alex, et al. “Breast cancer in Tanzanian, black American, and white American women: An assessment of prognostic and predictive features, including tumor infiltrating lymphocytes.Plos One, vol. 14, no. 11, Jan. 2019, p. e0224760. Epmc, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0224760.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1421623
PMID
31703083
Source
epmc
Published In
Plos One
Volume
14
Published Date
Start Page
e0224760
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0224760

Latent class analysis of multipollutant exposure

Authors
Larsen, A; Kolpacoff, V; McCormack, K; Hyslop, T
MLA Citation
Larsen, Alexandra, et al. “Latent class analysis of multipollutant exposure.” Cancer Prevention Research, vol. 13, no. 7, 2020, pp. 28–28.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1452684
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Cancer Prevention Research
Volume
13
Published Date
Start Page
28
End Page
28

Abstract A50: Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for monitoring and predicting response to neoadjuvant therapy (NAT) in high-risk early breast cancer patients in the I-SPY 2 TRIAL

Authors
Magbanua, MJM; Li, W; Wolf, DM; Yau, C; Hirst, GL; Brown-Swigart, L; Chien, AJ; Delson, AL; Gibbs, J; Aleshin, A; Zimmerman, B; Esserman, L; Hylton, N; Veer, LVT
MLA Citation
Magbanua, Mark Jesus M., et al. “Abstract A50: Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for monitoring and predicting response to neoadjuvant therapy (NAT) in high-risk early breast cancer patients in the I-SPY 2 TRIAL.” Poster Presentations  Proffered Abstracts, American Association for Cancer Research, 2020. Crossref, doi:10.1158/1557-3265.liqbiop20-a50.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1447834
Source
crossref
Published In
Poster Presentations Proffered Abstracts
Published Date
DOI
10.1158/1557-3265.liqbiop20-a50

Serial Analysis of Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer Receiving First-Line Chemotherapy.

BACKGROUND: We examined the prognostic significance of circulating tumor cell (CTC) dynamics during treatment in metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients receiving first-line chemotherapy. METHODS: Serial CTC data from 469 patients (2202 samples) were used to build a novel latent mixture model to identify groups with similar CTC trajectory (tCTC) patterns during the course of treatment. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in groups based on baseline CTCs, combined CTC status at baseline to the end of cycle 1, and tCTC. Akaike information criterion was used to select the model that best predicted PFS and OS. RESULTS: Latent mixture modeling revealed 4 distinct tCTC patterns: undetectable CTCs (56.9% ), low (23.7%), intermediate (14.5%), or high (4.9%). Patients with low, intermediate, and high tCTC patterns had statistically significant inferior PFS and OS compared with those with undetectable CTCs (P < .001). Akaike Information Criterion indicated that the tCTC model best predicted PFS and OS compared with baseline CTCs and combined CTC status at baseline to the end of cycle 1 models. Validation studies in an independent cohort of 1856 MBC patients confirmed these findings. Further validation using only a single pretreatment CTC measurement confirmed prognostic performance of the tCTC model. CONCLUSIONS: We identified 4 novel prognostic groups in MBC based on similarities in tCTC patterns during chemotherapy. Prognostic groups included patients with very poor outcome (intermediate + high CTCs, 19.4%) who could benefit from more effective treatment. Our novel prognostic classification approach may be used for fine-tuning of CTC-based risk stratification strategies to guide future prospective clinical trials in MBC.
Authors
Magbanua, MJM; Hendrix, LH; Hyslop, T; Barry, WT; Winer, EP; Hudis, C; Toppmeyer, D; Carey, LA; Partridge, AH; Pierga, J-Y; Fehm, T; Vidal-Martínez, J; Mavroudis, D; Garcia-Saenz, JA; Stebbing, J; Gazzaniga, P; Manso, L; Zamarchi, R; Antelo, ML; Mattos-Arruda, LD; Generali, D; Caldas, C; Munzone, E; Dirix, L; Delson, AL; Burstein, HJ; Qadir, M; Ma, C; Scott, JH; Bidard, F-C; Park, JW; Rugo, HS
MLA Citation
Magbanua, Mark Jesus M., et al. “Serial Analysis of Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer Receiving First-Line Chemotherapy.J Natl Cancer Inst, vol. 113, no. 4, Apr. 2021, pp. 443–52. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/jnci/djaa113.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1454271
PMID
32770247
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Natl Cancer Inst
Volume
113
Published Date
Start Page
443
End Page
452
DOI
10.1093/jnci/djaa113

Research Areas:

Breast Neoplasms
Cancer Disparities
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms
Gastrointestinal Hormones
Gastrointestinal Tract
Health Disparities
Lung Neoplasms
Models, Statistical
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Prognosis
Socioeconomic Factors
Spatial analysis (Statistics)
Survival Analysis
Urogenital System