Xiaoyin Jiang

Overview:

I am a pathologist specializing in cytopathology and surgical pathology. I diagnose diseases through integrating clinical history and studying patient samples under the microscope. As a cytopathologist, I perform fine needle aspiration biopsies in our clinic. I serve as Chief of the Head and Neck Service, and Director of the Duke Pathology Communications Group.
My research interests focus on the pathology of the head and neck and endocrine systems, with particular interest in thyroid nodules and neoplasia, and ultrasound-guided FNA. I work with a multidisciplinary team to improve our understanding of disease. I also focus on novel applications of social media for physicians and medical education.



Positions:

Associate Professor of Pathology

Pathology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2009

Duke University School of Medicine

Resident, Pathology

Duke University School of Medicine

Fellow, Cytopathology

Duke University School of Medicine

Grants:

Rapid 3D whole-slide microscope digitization for thick cytopathology slides

Administered By
Pathology
Awarded By
Ramona Optics, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Crystals and crystalloids in cytopathology: Incidence and importance.

Many crystals and crystal-like structures may be encountered in cytopathology practice and can represent both beautiful novelties and diagnostic aids. The authors present an organ-specific review of the published literature on crystals combined with personal experiences. The purpose is not only to serve as a reference guide by highlighting the clinical and morphologic features of crystals, crystalloids, and crystal-like structures but also to review their significance and to offer reporting strategies in cases that bear management implications.
Authors
Torous, VF; Dodd, LG; McIntire, PJ; Jiang, XS
MLA Citation
Torous, Vanda F., et al. “Crystals and crystalloids in cytopathology: Incidence and importance.Cancer Cytopathol, June 2022. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cncy.22602.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1523792
PMID
35666580
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Cytopathol
Published Date
DOI
10.1002/cncy.22602

COVID-19 pandemic impact on cytopathology practice in the post-lockdown period: An international, multicenter study.

BACKGROUND: In a previous worldwide survey, the authors showed a drastic reduction in the number of cytological specimens processed during the coronavirus disease 2019 "lockdown" period along with an increase in malignancy rates. To assess the continued impact of the pandemic on cytological practices around the world, they undertook a second follow-up worldwide survey collecting data from the post-lockdown period (2020). METHODS: Participants were asked to provide data regarding their cytopathology activity during the first 12 weeks of their respective national post-lockdown period (2020), which ranged from April 4 to October 31. Differences between the post-lockdown period and the corresponding 2019 period were evaluated, and the authors specifically focused on rates of malignant diagnoses. RESULTS: A total of 29 respondents from 17 countries worldwide joined the survey. Overall, a lower number of cytological specimens (n = 236,352) were processed in comparison with the same period in 2019 (n = 321,466) for a relative reduction of 26.5%. The overall malignancy rate showed a statistically significant increase (12,442 [5.26%] vs 12,882 [4.01%]; P < .001) during the same time period. Similar results were obtained if both malignancy and suspicious for malignancy rates were considered together (15,759 [6.58%] vs 16,011 [4.98%]; P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: The data showed a persistent reduction in the cytological specimen volume during the post-lockdown period (2020). However, the relative increase in the cytological workload in the late part of the post-lockdown is a promising finding of a slow return to normality.
Authors
Vigliar, E; Pisapia, P; Dello Iacovo, F; Alcaraz-Mateos, E; Alì, G; Ali, SZ; Baloch, ZW; Bellevicine, C; Bongiovanni, M; Botsun, P; Bruzzese, D; Bubendorf, L; Büttner, R; Canberk, S; Capitanio, A; Casadio, C; Cazacu, E; Cochand-Priollet, B; D'Amuri, A; Davis, K; Eloy, C; Engels, M; Fadda, G; Fontanini, G; Fulciniti, F; Hofman, P; Iaccarino, A; Ieni, A; Jiang, XS; Kakudo, K; Kern, I; Kholova, I; Linton McDermott, KM; Liu, C; Lobo, A; Lozano, MD; Malapelle, U; Maleki, Z; Michelow, P; Mikula, MW; Musayev, J; Özgün, G; Oznur, M; Peiró Marqués, FM; Poller, D; Pyzlak, M; Robinson, B; Rossi, ED; Roy-Chowdhuri, S; Saieg, M; Savic Prince, S; Schmitt, FC; Seguí Iváñez, FJ; Štoos-Veić, T; Sulaieva, O; Sweeney, BJ; Tuccari, G; van Velthuysen, M-L; VanderLaan, PA; Vielh, P; Viola, P; Voorham, QJM; Weynand, B; Zeppa, P; Faquin, WC; Pitman, MB; Troncone, G
MLA Citation
Vigliar, Elena, et al. “COVID-19 pandemic impact on cytopathology practice in the post-lockdown period: An international, multicenter study.Cancer Cytopathol, vol. 130, no. 5, May 2022, pp. 344–51. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cncy.22547.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1506124
PMID
35006650
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Cytopathol
Volume
130
Published Date
Start Page
344
End Page
351
DOI
10.1002/cncy.22547

Teaching interventional cytopathology

Interventional cytopathology is a unique area of pathology, where cytopathologists play a primary role in obtaining fine needle aspiration biopsies and/or making determinations through rapid on-site evaluations to guide sample procurement in real-time. Unsurprisingly, experience and skill are directly related to success in these endeavors, and both can be fostered with formal instruction. There is a wealth of resources available to aid in teaching interventional cytopathology, including instructional videos, courses, and model phantoms which can help to build familiarity and confidence. These tools can provide a basic framework upon which skills can be developed through in-person guidance, real-time feedback and practice. This article reviews the tools available to enhance training, details the authors’ institutional experience in teaching interventional cytopathology at a tertiary care center, and provides recommendations and pearls for success in this endeavor.
Authors
MLA Citation
Jiang, X. S., and W. C. Foo. “Teaching interventional cytopathology.” Seminars in Diagnostic Pathology, Jan. 2022. Scopus, doi:10.1053/j.semdp.2022.01.002.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1507548
Source
scopus
Published In
Seminars in Diagnostic Pathology
Published Date
DOI
10.1053/j.semdp.2022.01.002

Innovations: Innovating together while social distancing.

Authors
Jiang, XS; Madrigal, E
MLA Citation
Jiang, Xiaoyin Sara, and Emilio Madrigal. “Innovations: Innovating together while social distancing.Cancer Cytopathol, vol. 129, no. 2, Feb. 2021, pp. 99–101. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cncy.22325.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1477875
PMID
33058521
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Cytopathol
Volume
129
Published Date
Start Page
99
End Page
101
DOI
10.1002/cncy.22325

Global impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on cytopathology practice: Results from an international survey of laboratories in 23 countries.

BACKGROUND: To the authors' knowledge, the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on cytopathology practices worldwide has not been investigated formally. In the current study, data from 41 respondents from 23 countries were reported. METHODS: Data regarding the activity of each cytopathology laboratory during 4 weeks of COVID-19 lockdown were collected and compared with those obtained during the corresponding period in 2019. The overall number and percentage of exfoliative and fine-needle aspiration cytology samples from each anatomic site were recorded. Differences in the malignancy and suspicious rates between the 2 periods were analyzed using a meta-analytical approach. RESULTS: Overall, the sample volume was lower compared with 2019 (104,319 samples vs 190,225 samples), with an average volume reduction of 45.3% (range, 0.1%-98.0%). The percentage of samples from the cervicovaginal tract, thyroid, and anorectal region was significantly reduced (P < .05). Conversely, the percentage of samples from the urinary tract, serous cavities, breast, lymph nodes, respiratory tract, salivary glands, central nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, liver, and biliary tract increased (P < .05). An overall increase of 5.56% (95% CI, 3.77%-7.35%) in the malignancy rate in nongynecological samples during the COVID-19 pandemic was observed. When the suspicious category was included, the overall increase was 6.95% (95% CI, 4.63%-9.27%). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a drastic reduction in the total number of cytology specimens regardless of anatomic site or specimen type. The rate of malignancy increased, reflecting the prioritization of patients with cancer who were considered to be at high risk. Prospective monitoring of the effect of delays in access to health services during the lockdown period is warranted.
Authors
Vigliar, E; Cepurnaite, R; Alcaraz-Mateos, E; Ali, SZ; Baloch, ZW; Bellevicine, C; Bongiovanni, M; Botsun, P; Bruzzese, D; Bubendorf, L; Büttner, R; Canberk, S; Capitanio, A; Casadio, C; Cazacu, E; Cochand-Priollet, B; D'Amuri, A; Eloy, C; Engels, M; Fadda, G; Fontanini, G; Fulciniti, F; Hofman, P; Iaccarino, A; Ieni, A; Jiang, XS; Kakudo, K; Kern, I; Kholova, I; Liu, C; Lobo, A; Lozano, MD; Malapelle, U; Maleki, Z; Michelow, P; Musayev, J; Özgün, G; Oznur, M; Peiró Marqués, FM; Pisapia, P; Poller, D; Pyzlak, M; Robinson, B; Rossi, ED; Roy-Chowdhuri, S; Saieg, M; Savic Prince, S; Schmitt, FC; Javier Seguí Iváñez, F; Štoos-Veić, T; Sulaieva, O; Sweeney, BJ; Tuccari, G; van Velthuysen, M-L; VanderLaan, PA; Vielh, P; Viola, P; Voorham, R; Weynand, B; Zeppa, P; Faquin, WC; Pitman, MB; Troncone, G
MLA Citation
Vigliar, Elena, et al. “Global impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on cytopathology practice: Results from an international survey of laboratories in 23 countries.Cancer Cytopathol, vol. 128, no. 12, Dec. 2020, pp. 885–94. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cncy.22373.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1463509
PMID
33108683
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Cytopathol
Volume
128
Published Date
Start Page
885
End Page
894
DOI
10.1002/cncy.22373

Research Areas:

Cytopathology
Needle biopsy
Pathology
Pathology, Molecular
Pathology, Oral
Pathology, Surgical
Social Media
Thyroid Neoplasms
Thyroid Nodule