Yubin Kang

Positions:

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1991

Shanghai Second Medical University (China)

Fellow, Hematology, Oncology, Cellular Therpay

Duke University School of Medicine

Grants:

Plerixafor for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

Administered By
Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A PHASE 2, MULTICENTER, MULTI-COHORT, OPEN-LABEL STUDY OF POMALIDOMIDE IN COMBINATION WITH LOW-DOSE DEXAMETHASONE OR POMALIDOMIDE IN COMBINATION WITH LOW-DOSE DEXAMETHASONE AND DARATUMUMAB IN SUBJECTS WITH RELAPSED OR REFRACTORY MULTIPLE MYELOMA

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Clinical characteristics, JAK2 status, and macrophage infiltration in multiple myeloma patients with marrow fibrosis

Administered By
Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Clinical Trial of ABC294640 in Patients with Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Administered By
Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Phase I study of Pomolidomide, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone (PVD) as First-Line treatment of AL Amyloidosis or Light Chain Deposition Disease

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

PPAR agonists attenuate lenalidomide's anti-myeloma activity in vitro and in vivo.

Many patients with multiple myeloma (MM) have comorbidities and are treated with PPAR agonists. Immunomodulatory agents (IMiDs) are the cornerstones for MM therapy. Currently, little is known about how co-administration of PPAR agonists impacts lenalidomide treatment in patients with MM. Here, we determined the effects of PPAR agonists on anti-myeloma activities of lenalidomide in vitro and in a myeloma xenograft mouse model. Genetic overexpression and CRISPR/cas9 knockout experiments were performed to determine the role of CRBN in the PPAR-mediated pathway. A retrospective cohort study was performed to determine the correlation of PPAR expression with the outcomes of patients with MM. PPAR agonists down-regulated CRBN expression and reduced the anti-myeloma efficacy of lenalidomide in vitro and in vivo. Co-treatment with PPAR antagonists increased CRBN expression and improved sensitivity to lenalidomide. PPAR expression was higher in bone marrow cells of patients with newly diagnosed MM than in normal control bone marrow samples. High PPAR expression was correlated with poor clinical outcomes. Our study provides the first evidence that PPARs transcriptionally regulate CRBN and that drug-drug interactions between PPAR agonists and IMiDs may impact myeloma treatment outcomes.
Authors
Sha, Y; Wu, J; Paul, B; Zhao, Y; Mathews, P; Li, Z; Norris, J; Wang, E; McDonnell, DP; Kang, Y
MLA Citation
Sha, Yonggang, et al. “PPAR agonists attenuate lenalidomide's anti-myeloma activity in vitro and in vivo.Cancer Lett, vol. 545, July 2022, p. 215832. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.canlet.2022.215832.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1529239
PMID
35872263
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Lett
Volume
545
Published Date
Start Page
215832
DOI
10.1016/j.canlet.2022.215832

Emerging Evidence of the Significance of Thioredoxin-1 in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Aging.

The United States is undergoing a demographic shift towards an older population with profound economic, social, and healthcare implications. The number of Americans aged 65 and older will reach 80 million by 2040. The shift will be even more dramatic in the extremes of age, with a projected 400% increase in the population over 85 years old in the next two decades. Understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of ageing is crucial to reduce ageing-associated disease and to improve the quality of life for the elderly. In this review, we summarized the changes associated with the ageing of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and what is known about some of the key underlying cellular and molecular pathways. We focus here on the effects of reactive oxygen species and the thioredoxin redox homeostasis system on ageing biology in HSCs and the HSC microenvironment. We present additional data from our lab demonstrating the key role of thioredoxin-1 in regulating HSC ageing.
Authors
Jabbar, S; Mathews, P; Kang, Y
MLA Citation
Jabbar, Shaima, et al. “Emerging Evidence of the Significance of Thioredoxin-1 in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Aging.Antioxidants (Basel), vol. 11, no. 7, June 2022. Pubmed, doi:10.3390/antiox11071291.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1530042
PMID
35883782
Source
pubmed
Published In
Antioxidants (Basel, Switzerland)
Volume
11
Published Date
DOI
10.3390/antiox11071291

Comparison of Cilta-cel, an Anti-BCMA CAR-T Cell Therapy, Versus Conventional Treatment in Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma.

BACKGROUND: In the single-arm, phase 1b/2 CARTITUDE-1 study, ciltacabtagene autoleucel (cilta-cel), an anti-B-cell maturation antigen chimeric antigen receptor T-cell (CAR-T) therapy, showed encouraging efficacy in US patients with multiple myeloma (MM) who previously received an immunomodulatory drug, proteasome inhibitor, and anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody (triple-class exposed). PATIENTS AND METHODS: A dataset of US patients refractory to an anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody (MAMMOTH) was used to identify patients who would meet eligibility for CARTITUDE-1 and received subsequent non-CAR-T therapy. The intent-to-treat (ITT) population in CARTITUDE-1 included patients who underwent apheresis (N = 113); the modified ITT (mITT) population was the subset who received cilta-cel (n = 97). Corresponding populations were identified from the MAMMOTH dataset: ITT population (n = 190) and mITT population of patients without progression/death within 47 days (median apheresis-to-cilta-cel infusion time) from onset of therapy (n = 122). Using 1:1 nearest neighbor propensity score matching to control for selected baseline covariates, 95 and 69 patients in CARTITUDE-1 ITT and mITT populations, respectively, were matched to MAMMOTH patients. RESULTS: In ITT cohorts of CARTITUDE-1 vs. MAMMOTH, improved overall response rate (ORR; 84% vs. 28% [P < .001]) and longer progression-free survival (PFS; hazard ratio [HR], 0.11 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.05-0.22]) and overall survival (OS; HR, 0.20 [95% CI, 0.10-0.39]) were observed. Similar results were seen in mITT cohorts of CARTITUDE-1 vs. MAMMOTH (ORR: 96% vs. 30% [P < .001]; PFS: HR, 0.02 [95% CI, 0.01-0.14]; OS: HR, 0.05 [95% CI, 0.01-0.22]) and with alternative matching methods. CONCLUSION: Cilta-cel yielded significantly improved outcomes versus real-world therapies in triple-class exposed patients with relapsed/refractory MM.
Authors
Costa, LJ; Lin, Y; Cornell, RF; Martin, T; Chhabra, S; Usmani, SZ; Jagannath, S; Callander, NS; Berdeja, JG; Kang, Y; Vij, R; Godby, KN; Malek, E; Neppalli, A; Liedtke, M; Fiala, M; Tian, H; Valluri, S; Marino, J; Jackson, CC; Banerjee, A; Kansagra, A; Schecter, JM; Kumar, S; Hari, P
MLA Citation
Costa, Luciano J., et al. “Comparison of Cilta-cel, an Anti-BCMA CAR-T Cell Therapy, Versus Conventional Treatment in Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma.Clin Lymphoma Myeloma Leuk, vol. 22, no. 5, May 2022, pp. 326–35. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.clml.2021.10.013.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1503153
PMID
34840088
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clin Lymphoma Myeloma Leuk
Volume
22
Published Date
Start Page
326
End Page
335
DOI
10.1016/j.clml.2021.10.013

Treatment outcomes of triple class refractory multiple myeloma: a benchmark for new therapies.

Authors
Bal, S; Malek, E; Kansagra, A; Usmani, SZ; Vij, R; Godby, KN; Cornell, RF; Kang, Y; Umyarova, E; Giri, S; Chhabra, S; Liedtke, M; Callander, NS; Hari, P; Kumar, S; Costa, LJ
MLA Citation
Bal, Susan, et al. “Treatment outcomes of triple class refractory multiple myeloma: a benchmark for new therapies.Leukemia, vol. 36, no. 3, Mar. 2022, pp. 877–80. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41375-021-01471-3.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1503152
PMID
34802043
Source
pubmed
Published In
Leukemia
Volume
36
Published Date
Start Page
877
End Page
880
DOI
10.1038/s41375-021-01471-3

Anaplastic Multiple Myeloma: Case Series and Literature Review.

BACKGROUND: Anaplastic multiple myeloma (AMM) is a very rare but distinct subtype of multiple myeloma (MM) with an extremely poor prognosis. Due to its rarity, AMM lacks detailed descriptions and clear definitions. Moreover, there is no consensus on the treatment and evidence suggests that AMM responds poorly to several novel therapies. We conducted a literature review and retrospective case series to determine clinical characteristics, pathological features, and outcomes of AMM. CASE PRESENTATION: Published case reports and case series of AMM since 1983 were systematically extracted and reviewed. A total of 52 patients with AMM were reported in the PUBMED since 1983, including 26 males (50%) and 26 females (50%). The age ranged from 29 years old to 85 years old, with a mean age of 57.02 years old. Most of the patients presented with bone pain (23, 44.2%), fatigue (18, 34.6%), plasmacytoma (18, 34.6%) and weight loss (7, 13.5%). The median survival of the patients was 4 months. To investigate the outcomes of patients with AMM in the current era of treatment, a series of 14 patients with AMM diagnosed at our institute between December 2012 and July 2021was retrospectively analyzed. Our retrospective case series consisted of 12 males (85.7%) and 2 females (14.3%), with a mean age of 59 years old. Most of our AMM patients displayed bone lytic lesions as a common manifestation. The common cytogenetic abnormality was 1q amplification. All patients received standard combination chemotherapy consisting of proteasome inhibitors and/or immunomodulatory agents, and half of the patients underwent autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) for our 14 AMM patients were 0.84 years and 1.52 years, respectively, which was significantly worse than the regular MM patients treated at our institute from 2003-2013 who had a PFS of 2.28 years and OS of 4.92 years. CONCLUSIONS: AMM is a very rare, morphologically distinct variant of MM. It has adverse cytogenetics and an aggressive course. It is often resistant to standard chemotherapy and presents with an extremely low survival rate.
Authors
Wu, J; Chu, E; Chase, CC; Choi, T; Gasparetto, C; Young, K; Kang, Y
MLA Citation
Wu, Jian, et al. “Anaplastic Multiple Myeloma: Case Series and Literature Review.Asploro J Biomed Clin Case Rep, vol. 5, no. 1, Jan. 2022, pp. 1–11. Pubmed, doi:10.36502/2022/asjbccr.6255.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1511078
PMID
35224465
Source
pubmed
Published In
Asploro J Biomed Clin Case Rep
Volume
5
Published Date
Start Page
1
End Page
11
DOI
10.36502/2022/asjbccr.6255