Yubin Kang

Positions:

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1991

Shanghai Second Medical University (China)

Fellow, Hematology, Oncology, Cellular Therpay

Duke University School of Medicine

Grants:

Plerixafor for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

Administered By
Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A PHASE 2, MULTICENTER, MULTI-COHORT, OPEN-LABEL STUDY OF POMALIDOMIDE IN COMBINATION WITH LOW-DOSE DEXAMETHASONE OR POMALIDOMIDE IN COMBINATION WITH LOW-DOSE DEXAMETHASONE AND DARATUMUMAB IN SUBJECTS WITH RELAPSED OR REFRACTORY MULTIPLE MYELOMA

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Celgene Corporation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Clinical characteristics, JAK2 status, and macrophage infiltration in multiple myeloma patients with marrow fibrosis

Administered By
Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
Awarded By
Incyte Corporation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Clinical Trial of ABC294640 in Patients with Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Administered By
Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
Awarded By
Apogee Biotechnology Corporation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Phase I study of Pomolidomide, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone (PVD) as First-Line treatment of AL Amyloidosis or Light Chain Deposition Disease

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Karmanos Cancer Center
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

The impact of bone marrow fibrosis and JAK2 expression on clinical outcomes in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma treated with immunomodulatory agents and/or proteasome inhibitors.

We determined the impact of bone marrow fibrosis (BMF) on the clinical outcomes of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (NDMM) patients in the current era of myeloma therapy. A total of 393 MM patients were included in the final analysis. The median followup was 83 months (range: 3.9 to 212 months). BMF was noted in 122 (48.2%) evaluable patients. Median progression free survival (PFS) in patients without BMF was 30.2 (95% CI: 24.7-38.0) months, and 21.1 (95% CI: 18.8-27.5) months in patients with BMF present (P = .024). Median overall survival (OS) was 61.2 (95% CI: 51.5-81.2) months in patients without BMF, and 45.1 (95% CI: 38.7-57.0) months in patients with BMF (P = .0048). A subset of 99 patients had their bone marrow biopsies stained for JAK1 and JAK2 by immunohistochemistry. Of these samples 67 (67.7%) patients had detectable JAK2 expression predominantly noted on bone marrow megakaryocytes. JAK2 expression correlated with myeloma disease stage (P = .0071). Our study represents the largest dataset to date examining the association of BMF with prognosis in the era of novel therapies and widespread use of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Our data suggest that MM patients with BMF (particularly those with extensive BMF) have a poorer prognosis even when treated with immunomodulatory agents and proteasome inhibitors.
Authors
Paul, B; Zhao, Y; Loitsch, G; Feinberg, D; Mathews, P; Barak, I; Dupuis, M; Li, Z; Rein, L; Wang, E; Kang, Y
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1450618
PMID
32628819
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Medicine
Published Date
DOI
10.1002/cam4.3265

Phase I dose escalation study of naive T-cell depleted donor lymphocyte infusion following allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

Prophylactic donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI) are used to augment post-transplant immune recovery to reduce both infectious complications and disease recurrence. Preclinical studies implicate the naive T-cell subset as the primary driver of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). In this phase I dose escalation study, we assessed the safety of a DLI that was depleted of CD45RA+ naive T cells. Sixteen adult patients received a prophylactic DLI at a median of 113 days (range 76-280 days) following an HLA-identical, non-myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Three patients each received the naive T-cell depleted DLI with a CD3+ dose of 1 × 105/kg, 1 × 106/kg, and 5 × 106/kg. The maximum dose of 1 × 107/kg was expanded to 7 patients. No dose-limiting grade III/IV acute GvHD or adverse events attributable to the DLI were observed at any dose level. One patient developed grade 2 acute GvHD of skin and upper intestines, and another developed moderate chronic GvHD of the lungs following the DLI. With a median follow-up of 2.8 years, 2-year progression-free and overall survival is 50.0% and 68.8%, respectively. In conclusion, these data suggest that a DLI that has been depleted of CD45RA+ naive T cells is feasible and carries a low risk of acute or chronic GvHD.
Authors
Maung, KK; Chen, BJ; Barak, I; Li, Z; Rizzieri, DA; Gasparetto, C; Sullivan, KM; Long, GD; Engemann, AM; Waters-Pick, B; Nichols, KR; Lopez, R; Kang, Y; Sarantopoulos, S; Sung, AD; Chao, NJ; Horwitz, ME
MLA Citation
Maung, Ko K., et al. “Phase I dose escalation study of naive T-cell depleted donor lymphocyte infusion following allogeneic stem cell transplantation.Bone Marrow Transplant, July 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41409-020-0991-5.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1450672
PMID
32624583
Source
pubmed
Published In
Bone Marrow Transplant
Published Date
DOI
10.1038/s41409-020-0991-5

A Prospective Study Of Donor Immuknow® As A Biomarker For Acute GvHD In Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipients

Authors
Kang, Y; DeOliveira, A; Peel, LE; Chen, D-F; Chao, N
MLA Citation
Kang, Y., et al. “A Prospective Study Of Donor Immuknow® As A Biomarker For Acute GvHD In Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipients.” Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, vol. 16, no. 2, Elsevier BV, 2010, pp. S311–S311. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.bbmt.2009.12.463.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1452753
Source
crossref
Published In
Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation : Journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Volume
16
Published Date
Start Page
S311
End Page
S311
DOI
10.1016/j.bbmt.2009.12.463

Gamma Gap: A Point-of-Care Test That Correlates With Disease Burden and Treatment Response in Multiple Myeloma.

PURPOSE:We performed a retrospective chart review on 393 patients with multiple myeloma (MM) to determine the utility of the gamma gap (GG). METHODS:We calculated the difference between a patient's total serum protein and albumin as a point-of-care test for assessing disease status in MM. RESULTS:GG is highly correlated with the level of M-spike, and the change in GG correlates with myeloma treatment response. In addition, fitted linear models were established that allow for the calculation of M-protein level from the GG within hours from blood draw. CONCLUSION:Our study has important implications in the care of MM, particularly in countries/areas with limited resources.
Authors
Dupuis, MM; Paul, B; Loitsch, G; Mathews, P; Feinberg, D; Barak, I; Li, Z; Tuchman, SA; Kang, Y
MLA Citation
Dupuis, Megan M., et al. “Gamma Gap: A Point-of-Care Test That Correlates With Disease Burden and Treatment Response in Multiple Myeloma.Jco Oncology Practice, vol. 16, no. 8, Aug. 2020, pp. e751–57. Epmc, doi:10.1200/jop.19.00517.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1437138
PMID
32240071
Source
epmc
Published In
Jco Oncology Practice
Volume
16
Published Date
Start Page
e751
End Page
e757
DOI
10.1200/jop.19.00517

Relationship of acquired resistance of myeloma cells to bortezomib with Lyn and Src induced inhibition of PP2A and effect of treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib.

Authors
Paul, B; Feinberg, D; Sundaramoorthy, P; Weinberg, JB; Kang, Y
MLA Citation
Paul, Barry, et al. “Relationship of acquired resistance of myeloma cells to bortezomib with Lyn and Src induced inhibition of PP2A and effect of treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib.Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 36, no. 15_suppl, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), 2018, pp. 8047–8047. Crossref, doi:10.1200/jco.2018.36.15_suppl.8047.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1441256
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
36
Published Date
Start Page
8047
End Page
8047
DOI
10.1200/jco.2018.36.15_suppl.8047