Sarah Kelleher

Overview:

Sarah A. Kelleher, PhD is a Clinical Psychologist and Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University Medical Center. Dr. Kelleher is a member of the Duke Pain Prevention and Treatment Research Program and the Duke Cancer Control and Population Sciences Program. Dr. Kelleher completed her graduate training in clinical psychology at Virginia Tech and her clinical internship and postdoctoral fellowship at Duke University Medical Center. Her research focuses on developing, testing, and implementing behavioral symptom management interventions for patients with chronic disease.

Positions:

Assistant Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine & Neurosciences
School of Medicine

Member of the

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 2014

Virginia Polytech Institute and State University

Grants:

Pilot Testing a Virtual Reality Protocol for Improving Pain and Pain-Related Distress in Patients with Advanced Stage Colorectal Cancer

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine & Neurosciences
Awarded By
University of Colorado - Denver
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Hybrid-delivered cognitive behavioral symptom management and activity coaching intervention for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant: Findings from intervention development and a pilot randomized trial.

OBJECTIVE: Develop and pilot test a mobile health (mHealth) cognitive behavioral coping skills training and activity coaching protocol (HCT Symptoms and Steps) for hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) patients. DESIGN: Two-phase, mixed methods study. SAMPLE: HCT patients and healthcare providers. METHODS: Phase I was patient (n = 5) and provider (n = 1) focus groups and user testing (N = 5) to develop the HCT Symptoms and Steps protocol. Phase II was a pilot randomized trial (N = 40) to evaluate feasibility, acceptability, and pre-to-post outcomes (e.g., physical disability, pain, fatigue, distress, physical activity, symptom self-efficacy) compared to an education control. FINDINGS: Qualitative feedback on symptoms, recruitment strategies, coping skills, and mHealth components (e.g., Fitbit, mobile app) were integrated into the protocol. HCT Symptoms and Steps were feasible and acceptable. Pre-post changes suggest physical disability and activity improved while symptoms (e.g., fatigue, distress) decreased. CONCLUSIONS: HCT Symptoms and Steps have strong feasibility and acceptability and shows promise for benefits. Larger, fully-powered randomized trials are needed to examine intervention efficacy. IMPLICATIONS: HCT Symptoms and Steps may reduce physical disability and improve health outcomes post-transplant. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT03859765.
Authors
Kelleher, SA; Fisher, HM; Hyland, K; Miller, SN; Amaden, G; Diachina, A; Pittman, AS; Winger, JG; Sung, A; Berchuck, S; Samsa, G; Somers, TJ
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1559106
PMID
36476318
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Psychosoc Oncol
Published Date
Start Page
1
End Page
19
DOI
10.1080/07347332.2022.2152519

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PAIN AND DEPRESSION IN WOMEN WITH BREAST CANCER AND PAIN: PAIN SELF-EFFICACY AND PAIN CATASTROPHIZING

Authors
Fisher, HM; Winger, JG; Miller, SN; Wright, AN; Vilardaga, JP; Majestic, C; Kelleher, SA; Somers, TJ
MLA Citation
Fisher, Hannah M., et al. “RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PAIN AND DEPRESSION IN WOMEN WITH BREAST CANCER AND PAIN: PAIN SELF-EFFICACY AND PAIN CATASTROPHIZING.” Annals of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 55, 2021, pp. S397–S397.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1484587
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume
55
Published Date
Start Page
S397
End Page
S397

Linking physical activity to personal values: feasibility and acceptability randomized pilot of a behavioral intervention for older adults with osteoarthritis pain.

BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis (OA) pain is common and leads to functional impairment for many older adults. Physical activity can improve OA outcomes for older adults, but few are appropriately active. Behavioral interventions can reduce physical activity barriers. We developed and tested a brief, novel behavioral intervention (i.e., Engage-PA) for older adults combining values to enhance motivation and strategic activity pacing to improve arthritis-related pain and functioning and increase physical activity. METHODS: A randomized feasibility and acceptability pilot trial compared Engage-PA to treatment-as-usual plus fitness tracker (TAU+) in N = 40 adults age 65+ with OA pain in the knee or hip. Engage-PA involved two 60-min telephone sessions. All participants wore a fitness tracker to collect daily steps throughout the study and completed baseline and post-treatment assessments of secondary outcomes (arthritis-related pain and physical functioning, physical activity, psychological distress, psychological flexibility, and valued living). The impact of COVID-19 on general well-being and physical activity was also assessed. Descriptive statistics were conducted for feasibility and acceptability outcomes. Indicators of improvement in secondary outcomes were examined via change scores from baseline to post-treatment and performing independent samples t-tests to assess for between-group differences. RESULTS: Feasibility was high; 100% accrual, low (5%) attrition, and 100% completion of study sessions. Acceptability was high, with 89% finding the intervention "mostly" or "very" helpful. Engage-PA participants demonstrated improvements in arthritis pain severity (Mdiff = 1.68, p = 0.044, 95% CI [- 0.26, 3.62]) and self-reported activity (Mdiff = 0.875, p = 0.038, 95% CI [- 1.85, 0.98]) from baseline to post-treatment as compared to TAU+. Due to pandemic-related challenges, there was a high level of missing data (43%) for daily steps, but available data showed no significant change in steps over time or between the groups. COVID-19 added an additional burden to participants, such that 50% were exercising less, 68% were more sedentary, and 72% lost access to spaces and social support to be active. CONCLUSIONS: Engage-PA is a promising brief, novel behavioral intervention with the potential to support older adults in improving arthritis-related pain and functioning and increasing physical activity. The feasibility and acceptability of Engage-PA are particularly notable as most participants reported COVID-19 added more barriers to physical activity. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04490395 . Registered on July 29, 2020.
Authors
MLA Citation
Plumb Vilardaga, Jennifer C., et al. “Linking physical activity to personal values: feasibility and acceptability randomized pilot of a behavioral intervention for older adults with osteoarthritis pain.Pilot Feasibility Stud, vol. 8, no. 1, Aug. 2022, p. 164. Pubmed, doi:10.1186/s40814-022-01121-0.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1532231
PMID
35915512
Source
pubmed
Published In
Pilot and Feasibility Studies
Volume
8
Published Date
Start Page
164
DOI
10.1186/s40814-022-01121-0

Virtual reality for improving pain and pain-related symptoms in patients with advanced stage colorectal cancer: A pilot trial to test feasibility and acceptability.

OBJECTIVE: Virtual reality (VR) has the potential to improve pain and pain-related symptoms. We examined the feasibility, acceptability, safety, and impact of a 30-min virtual underwater/sea environment (VR Blue) for reducing pain and pain-related symptoms in advanced colorectal cancer patients. A qualitative exit interview was conducted to understand preferences, thoughts, and feelings about the VR session. METHOD: Participants (N = 20) had stage IV colorectal cancer and moderate-to-severe pain. Participants completed a 30-min VR Blue session that visually and aurally immersed them in virtual ocean scenarios. Feasibility was assessed by accrual (N = 20), protocol adherence (≥80% completing VR Blue), and completed data (≥80% assessment completion). Acceptability was determined by patients reporting ≥80% intervention satisfaction. Safety was determined by ≥80% of patients completing the session without self-reported side effects. Measures of pain, tension, relaxation, stress, anxiety, and mood were collected before, during, and after the VR Blue session. A semi-structured qualitative interview was conducted after VR Blue to assess participants' VR experiences. RESULTS: All participants (100%) completed the VR Blue session. There was 100% data collection at the pre- and post-assessments. Satisfaction with VR Blue was high M = 3.3 (SD = 0.4) (83%). No significant side effects were reported. Pain decreased by 59% (Pre-M = 3 [1]; Post-M = 1 [1]). Tension decreased by 74% (Pre-M = 30 [24]; Post-M = 8 [13]). Relaxation improved by 38% (Pre-M = 62 [21]); Post-M = 86 [17]). Stress decreased by 68% (Pre-M = 24 [24]; Post-M = 8 [14]). Anxiety decreased by 65% (Pre-M = 20 [23]; Post-M = 7 [13]). Mood improved by 70% (Pre-M = 13 [16]; Post-M = 4 [11]). Qualitative data suggested a positive response to the VR Blue protocol. SIGNIFICANCE OF RESULTS: This work supports the feasibility, acceptability, and safety of VR Blue for advanced colorectal cancer patients. Participants showed significant pre-post improvement in pain and pain-related symptoms hinting to the potential feasibility of VR interventions in this population. Larger, randomized trials with a control condition are needed to examine the efficacy of VR-based interventions for patients with advanced colorectal cancer and pain.
Authors
Kelleher, SA; Fisher, HM; Winger, JG; Miller, SN; Amaden, GH; Somers, TJ; Colloca, L; Uronis, HE; Keefe, FJ
MLA Citation
Kelleher, Sarah A., et al. “Virtual reality for improving pain and pain-related symptoms in patients with advanced stage colorectal cancer: A pilot trial to test feasibility and acceptability.Palliat Support Care, vol. 20, no. 4, Aug. 2022, pp. 471–81. Pubmed, doi:10.1017/S1478951521002017.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1506643
PMID
35078545
Source
pubmed
Published In
Palliat Support Care
Volume
20
Published Date
Start Page
471
End Page
481
DOI
10.1017/S1478951521002017

Pain, depressive symptoms, and self-efficacy for pain management: examination in African-American women with breast cancer.

PURPOSE: African-American women with breast cancer face significant disparities, including high levels of pain. Depressive symptoms and self-efficacy for pain management impact how women with breast cancer manage pain, yet little is known about how these variables relate to pain specifically for African-American women with breast cancer. METHODS: Baseline linear regression analyses were conducted using a sample of women (n = 98) with stage I-III breast cancer identifying as Black or African-American who were part of a larger intervention trial. Linear regressions explored the effect of depressive symptoms on pain (i.e., severity and interference), and the effect of self-efficacy for pain management on pain. Covariates were age (M = 57.22, SD = 10.76), cancer stage (50% = stage 1), and education level (36% = some college). RESULTS: Participants reported moderate levels of pain severity and interference. Higher depressive symptoms were related to both higher pain severity and interference; (B = 0.06, p < 0.01, 95% CI [0.02,0.09]) and (B = 0.13, p < 0.001, 95% CI [0.09, 0.17]) respectively. Likewise, lower self-efficacy for pain management was also related to both higher pain severity and interference; (B =  - 0.04, p < 0.001, 95% CI [- 0.05, - 0.02]) and (B =  - 0.06, p < 0.001, 95% CI [- 0.08, - 0.04]) respectively. Women reporting less than a high school diploma endorsed significantly higher pain severity and interference than women reporting some college. Age and cancer stage were not significantly related to pain. CONCLUSION: Pain for African-American women with breast cancer may be influenced by depressive symptoms and self-efficacy for pain management, in addition to other important variables. Attending to better assessment and treatment of depressive symptoms and self-efficacy for pain management may improve outcomes.
Authors
Vilardaga, JCP; Fisher, HM; Winger, JG; Miller, SN; Nuñez, C; Majestic, C; Kelleher, SA; Somers, TJ
MLA Citation
Vilardaga, Jennifer C. Plumb, et al. “Pain, depressive symptoms, and self-efficacy for pain management: examination in African-American women with breast cancer.Support Care Cancer, vol. 30, no. 8, Aug. 2022, pp. 6633–40. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s00520-022-07083-6.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1520289
PMID
35501516
Source
pubmed
Published In
Support Care Cancer
Volume
30
Published Date
Start Page
6633
End Page
6640
DOI
10.1007/s00520-022-07083-6