Mustafa Khasraw

Overview:

I am a Medical Oncologist and Neurooncologist at Duke's Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center.  I also work as the Deputy Director of the newly established Center for Cancer Immunotherapy, tasked to speed up clinical research and translation for scientists across all departments and across all tumor types at Duke, who have made discoveries that show promise for developing new immunotherapies.

Prior to joining Duke in September, 2019, I worked as a medical oncologist in Sydney, Australia and I was also as a Clinical Lead at the Australian National Health & Medical Research Council Clinical Trial Centre at The University of Sydney. 

I am leading several clinical and translational programs with significant laboratory collaborations. I am interested in innovative trials designed to improve outcome of cancer patients. I am lead principal investigator on phase I, II and III multi-center clinical trials for a number of pharmaceutical and academic groups. 

I serve as an advisor and grant reviewer for a number of non-profits and patient advocacy groups and I am a Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians as well as an Elected Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians (Lon, UK). 

Positions:

Instructor in the Department of Neurosurgery

Neurosurgery
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2001

Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands)

Publications:

Defining the Supportive Care Needs and Psychological Morbidity of Patients With Functioning Versus Nonfunctioning Neuroendocrine Tumors: Protocol for a Phase 1 Trial of a Nurse-Led Online and Phone-Based Intervention.

BACKGROUND: Online information resources and support have been demonstrated to positively influence the well-being of people diagnosed with cancer. This has been explored in past literature for more common cancers; however, for rare cancers, such as neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), there are little to no support or resources available. Despite relatively good prognoses, the quality of life (QoL) of patients with NETs is significantly lower compared with samples of mixed cancer patients and the general population. Patients with NETs also typically report unclear and difficult pathways of disease management and treatment, given the heterogeneity of the diagnosis. There is a vital need to improve the availability of disease-specific information for this patient group and provide supportive care that is tailored to the unique needs of the NET patient population. OBJECTIVE: This study described the protocol of a study aimed to better understand the outcomes and experiences of patients diagnosed with NETs and to develop and pilot test a nurse-led online and phone-based intervention that will provide tailored supportive care targeted to NET subgroups (functioning vs nonfunctioning). METHODS: This is a multisite cohort with 3 phases, incorporating both quantitative and qualitative data collection. Phase 1 is a mixed methods prospective cohort study of NET patients identifying differences in patient experiences and priority of needs between NET subgroups. Phase 2 utilizes results from phase 1 to develop an online and nurse-led phone-based intervention. Phase 3 is to pilot test and evaluate the intervention's acceptability, appropriateness, and feasibility. RESULTS: Currently, the project is progressing through phase 1 and has completed recruitment. A total of 138 participants have been recruited to the study. To date, patient-reported outcome data from 123 participants at baseline and 87 participants at 6-month follow-up have been collected. Of these, qualitative data from semistructured interviews from 35 participants have also been obtained. Phase 2 and phase 3 of the project are yet to be completed. CONCLUSIONS: Limited research for patients with NETs suggests that QoL and patient experiences are significantly impaired compared with the general population. Furthermore, past research has failed to delineate how the clinical variability between those with functioning and nonfunctioning NETs impacts patient supportive care needs. This study will improve on the availability of disease-specific information as well as informing the design of a nurse-led online and phone-based supportive care intervention tailored for the unique needs of the NET patient population. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): DERR1-10.2196/14361.
Authors
Guccione, L; Gough, K; Drosdowsky, A; Fisher, K; Price, T; Pavlakis, N; Khasraw, M; Wyld, D; Ransom, D; Kong, G; Rogers, M; Leyden, S; Leyden, J; Michael, M; Schofield, P
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1423082
PMID
31793892
Source
pubmed
Published In
Jmir Research Protocols
Volume
8
Published Date
Start Page
e14361
DOI
10.2196/14361

Pattern of failure in anaplastic glioma patients with an IDH1/2 mutation.

PURPOSE: The current study aimed to assess patterns of failure (PoF) in anaplastic glioma (AG) patients managed with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and their relationship to molecular subtype. METHODS: The outcomes of AG patients managed between 2008 and 2014 and entered into a prospective database were assessed, including PoF. AG was initially defined using the WHO 2007 classification, but for analysis, patients were subsequently recategorised based on WHO 2016 as anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AOD), astrocytoma isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutant (AAmut) or astrocytoma IDH wildtype (AAwt). Management involved IMRT and temozolomide (TMZ), including from 2011 patients with an IDH mutation (IDHmut) planned with 18F-fluoroethyltyrosine (FET) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography (PET). PoF was local, marginal or distant in relation to the IMRT volume. Relapse-free survival (RFS) was calculated from the start of IMRT. RESULTS: A total of 156 patients were assessed, with median follow-up of 5.1 years. Of these patients, 75% were IDHmut, 44% were managed at first or later relapse and 73% received TMZ. Relapse occurred in 68 patients, with 6‑year RFS of 75.0, 48.8 and 2.5% for AOD, AAmut and AAwt, respectively (p < 0.001). There was a component of local relapse in 63%, of marginal relapse in 19% and of distant relapse in 37% of relapses. Isolated local, marginal and distant relapse was evident in 51, 9 and 22%, respectively. A distant relapse pattern was more frequent in IDHmut compared to IDHwt patients (26% vs. 45%, p = 0.005), especially within the first 2 years post-IMRT. In multivariate analysis, distant relapse remained associated with AAmut (p < 0.002) and delayed IMRT until the second relapse (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Although patients with IDH-mutated AG have improved outcomes, there was a higher proportion of distant relapses occurring during the 2 years after IMRT.
Authors
Back, M; Jayamanne, D; Brazier, D; Newey, A; Bailey, D; Schembri, G; Hsiao, E; Khasraw, M; Wong, M; Kastelan, M; Brown, C; Wheeler, H
MLA Citation
Back, M., et al. “Pattern of failure in anaplastic glioma patients with an IDH1/2 mutation..” Strahlenther Onkol, Apr. 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s00066-019-01467-0.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1405544
PMID
31028406
Source
pubmed
Published In
Strahlenther Onkol
Published Date
DOI
10.1007/s00066-019-01467-0

Understanding the Revised Fourth Edition of the World Health Organization Classification of Tumours of the Central Nervous System (2016) for Clinical Decision-making: A Guide for Oncologists Managing Patients with Glioma.

The recognition of specific molecular prognostic factors has altered the management of primary brain tumours over the past decade. These factors have allowed stratification of morphologically similar tumours into different prognostic groups and are now also being used to determine clinical trial eligibility. Many of these factors have been included in the revised fourth edition of the World Health Organization (WHO) Classification of Tumours of the Central Nervous System, released in May 2016. This revised edition places greater emphasis on molecular testing and, for certain tumour types, molecular testing is required for diagnosis. Many pathology departments have also adopted the four-tiered report format suggested in the Haarlem guidelines, and provide a final 'integrated diagnosis' incorporating a morphological diagnosis, the WHO grade and molecular findings. Pathologists need to perform and report these molecular tests in a timeframe that is relevant for clinical decision-making. Clinicians need to understand and incorporate these changes into their daily practice, as they have direct effects on both the type and intent of therapeutic interventions.
Authors
Back, M; Rodriguez, M; Jayamanne, D; Khasraw, M; Lee, A; Wheeler, H
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1405551
PMID
29980381
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol)
Volume
30
Published Date
Start Page
556
End Page
562
DOI
10.1016/j.clon.2018.06.005

Agitg Nabnec: A Randomised Phase II Study of NAB-Paclitaxel in Combination With Carboplatin as First-Line Treatment of Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Carcinomas

Authors
Khasraw, M; Lipton, L; Hofman, M; Gebski, V; Gill, A; Markman, B; Yip, S; Gibbs, E; Karapetis, C; Pavlakis, N; Wong, SF; Ransom, D; Sjoquist, K; Michael, M; Rayani, U; Simes, J; Chantrill, L
MLA Citation
Khasraw, Mustafa, et al. “Agitg Nabnec: A Randomised Phase II Study of NAB-Paclitaxel in Combination With Carboplatin as First-Line Treatment of Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Carcinomas.” Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 13, WILEY, 2017, pp. 166–67.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1405626
Source
wos
Published In
Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
13
Published Date
Start Page
166
End Page
167

Combining PARP inhibitors with radiation therapy for the treatment of glioblastoma: Is PTEN predictive of response?

Glioblastoma (GBM) is fatal. The standard radiotherapy and chemotherapy (temozolomide) followed by an adjuvant phase of temozolomide provide patients with, on average, a 2.5 months benefit. New treatments that can improve sensitivity to the standard treatment are urgently needed. Herein, we review the mechanisms and utility of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors in combination with radiation therapy as a treatment option for GBM patients and the role of phosphatase and tensin homologue mutations as a biomarker of response.
Authors
Lester, A; Rapkins, R; Nixdorf, S; Khasraw, M; McDonald, K
MLA Citation
Lester, A., et al. “Combining PARP inhibitors with radiation therapy for the treatment of glioblastoma: Is PTEN predictive of response?.” Clin Transl Oncol, vol. 19, no. 3, Mar. 2017, pp. 273–78. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s12094-016-1547-4.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1405573
PMID
27655368
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clin Transl Oncol
Volume
19
Published Date
Start Page
273
End Page
278
DOI
10.1007/s12094-016-1547-4