William Lee

Overview:

Prostate cancer, Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT), Prostate HDR and LDR Brachytherapy, Quality of Life, Educational Technology

Positions:

Professor of Radiation Oncology

Radiation Oncology
School of Medicine

Associate Professor of Surgery

Surgery, Urology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1989

University of Virginia

M.S. 2000

Wake Forest University

Grants:

Image-Guide Radiation Therapy of Prostate Cancer

Administered By
Radiation Oncology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Prospective Comparative Study of Outcoems with Proton and Photon Radiation in Prostate Cancer PCS-2017C1-0422

Administered By
Radiation Oncology
Awarded By
University of Florida
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

A methodological comparison of mapping algorithms to obtain health utilities derived using cross-sectional and longitudinal data: Secondary analysis of NRG/RTOG 0415

Authors
Khairnar, RR; DeMora, L; Sandler, HM; Lee, WR; Olives, EV; Mullins, CD; Bruner, D; Shah, A; Malone, S; Michalski, J; Dayes, I; Seaward, SA; Albert, M; Currey, AD; Pisansky, TM; Chen, Y; Horwitz, EM; DeNittis, AS; Feng, FY; Mishra, MV
MLA Citation
Khairnar, Rahul Ramesh, et al. “A methodological comparison of mapping algorithms to obtain health utilities derived using cross-sectional and longitudinal data: Secondary analysis of NRG/RTOG 0415.” Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 38, no. 6, AMER SOC CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 2020.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1441651
Source
wos
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
38
Published Date

Phase II Trial of Enzalutamide and Androgen Deprivation Therapy with Salvage Radiation in Men with High-risk Prostate-specific Antigen Recurrent Prostate Cancer: The STREAM Trial.

BACKGROUND: Salvage external beam radiotherapy (RT) with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) improves survival over RT in men with prostate cancer (PC) and rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels after radical prostatectomy (RP). OBJECTIVE: To investigate the safety and efficacy of enzalutamide concurrent with salvage RT and ADT. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: This was a three-center prospective phase 2 single-arm trial (NCT02057939) of men with Gleason 7-10 PC and PSA recurrence within 4 yr of RP ranging from 0.2 to 4.0 ng/dl, no prior hormonal therapy, and no radiographic evidence of metastases. We enrolled 38 men; 37 completed therapy and were evaluable with testosterone recovery at 2 yr. INTERVENTION: Six months of ADT with 160 mg/d enzalutamide and 66 Gy RT to the prostate bed. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: The primary endpoint was improved 2-yr progression-free survival (PFS) over historical controls. Secondary objectives included 3-yr PFS, safety, and patient-reported quality of life (QOL). RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: The primary endpoint of 2-yr PFS was 65% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 47, 78) versus 51% (95% CI: 33, 67) in a trial of men with similar eligibility treated with salvage RT and adjuvant docetaxel. The 3-yr PFS was 53%. Eleven (29%) men experienced G3 toxicities, and there were no G4-5 or unexpected toxicities. QOL data suggest modest worsening of bowel, bladder, and hormonal symptoms at 3 mo, with recovery by 24 mo in most men. CONCLUSIONS: Salvage RT with enzalutamide and ADT following RP for men with PSA recurrent high-risk PC is safe and demonstrates encouraging efficacy, warranting prospective controlled phase 3 trials of ADT with or without potent androgen receptor inhibition in this curative-intent setting. PATIENT SUMMARY: Addition of 6 mo of oral daily enzalutamide to standard salvage radiation and hormone therapy is safe and may improve prostate cancer remission rates at 2 and 3 yr.
Authors
Bitting, RL; Healy, P; George, DJ; Anand, M; Kim, S; Mayer, T; Winters, C; Riggan, C; Rasmussen, J; Wilder, R; Stein, M; Frizzell, B; Harrison, MR; Zhang, T; Lee, WR; Wu, Y; Koontz, BF; Armstrong, AJ
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1432811
PMID
32063492
Source
pubmed
Published In
Eur Urol Oncol
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.euo.2020.01.005

Multi-Institutional Analysis of Synchronous Prostate and Rectosigmoid Cancers.

Purpose: To perform a multi-institutional analysis of patients with synchronous prostate and rectosigmoid cancers. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of Duke University and Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center records was performed for men with both prostate and rectosigmoid adenocarcinomas from 1988 to 2017. Synchronous presentation was defined as symptoms, diagnosis, or treatment of both cancers within 12 months of each other. The primary study endpoint was overall survival. Univariate and multivariable Cox regression was performed. Results: Among 31,883 men with prostate cancer, 330 (1%) also had rectosigmoid cancer and 54 (16%) of these were synchronous. Prostate cancer was more commonly the initial diagnosis (59%). Fifteen (28%) underwent prostatectomy or radiotherapy before an established diagnosis of rectosigmoid cancer. Stage I, II-III, or IV rectosigmoid cancer was present in 26, 57, and 17% of men, respectively. At a median follow-up of 43 months, there were 18 deaths due rectosigmoid cancer and two deaths due to prostate cancer. Crude late grade ≥3 toxicities include nine (17%) gastrointestinal and six (11%) genitourinary. Two anastomotic leaks following low anterior resection occurred in men who received a neoadjuvant radiotherapy prostate dose of 70.6-76.4 Gy. Rectosigmoid cancer stages II-III (HR 4.3, p = 0.02) and IV (HR 16, p < 0.01) as well as stage IV prostate cancer (HR 31, p < 0.01) were associated with overall survival on multivariable analysis. Conclusions: Synchronous rectosigmoid cancer is a greater contributor to mortality than prostate cancer. Men aged ≥45 with localized prostate cancer should undergo colorectal cancer screening prior to treatment to evaluate for synchronous rectosigmoid cancer.
Authors
Jacobs, CD; Trotter, J; Palta, M; Moravan, MJ; Wu, Y; Willett, CG; Lee, WR; Czito, BG
MLA Citation
Jacobs, Corbin D., et al. “Multi-Institutional Analysis of Synchronous Prostate and Rectosigmoid Cancers.Front Oncol, vol. 10, 2020, p. 345. Pubmed, doi:10.3389/fonc.2020.00345.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1436853
PMID
32266135
Source
pubmed
Published In
Frontiers in Oncology
Volume
10
Published Date
Start Page
345
DOI
10.3389/fonc.2020.00345

In recognition of the 2017 PRO reviewer apprentices

Authors
Robert Lee, W
MLA Citation
Robert Lee, W. “In recognition of the 2017 PRO reviewer apprentices.” Practical Radiation Oncology, vol. 8, no. 5, Sept. 2018, p. 297. Scopus, doi:10.1016/j.prro.2018.05.005.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1407291
Source
scopus
Published In
Practical Radiation Oncology
Volume
8
Published Date
Start Page
297
DOI
10.1016/j.prro.2018.05.005

Is radical prostatectomy appropriate for very-high-risk prostate cancer patients? No

© 2015, UBM Medica Healthcare Publications. All Rights Reserved. It is our opinion that surgery is inappropriate for very-high-risk prostate cancer and that a combination of EBRT and ADT should be the preferred treatment modality.
Authors
Boyle, JM; Robert Lee, W
MLA Citation
Boyle, J. M., and W. Robert Lee. “Is radical prostatectomy appropriate for very-high-risk prostate cancer patients? No.” Oncology (United States), vol. 29, no. 5, May 2015.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1407292
Source
scopus
Published In
Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.)
Volume
29
Published Date