Kamran Mahmood

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.B.B.S. 1995

King Edward Medical University (Pakistan)

M.P.H. 2005

University of Illinois

Resident, Internal Medicine

Nassau University Medical Center

Fellow, Pulmonary, Critical Care And Sleep Medicine

University of Illinois College of Medicine

Grants:

Lymphocyte exhaustion markers in malignanc pleural effusions of lung cancer

Administered By
Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine
Awarded By
Lung Cancer Initiative of North Carolina
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Case-Control Study to Verify Diagnostic Performance of AminoIndex¿ Technology

Administered By
Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine
Awarded By
Ajinomoto Co., Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Airflow 3: Multicenter randomized sham-controlled study to evaluate safety and efficacy after treatment with the Nuvaira Lung Denervation System in subjects with COPD

Administered By
Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine
Awarded By
Nuvaira, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Lymphocyte Exhaustion Markers in Malignant Pleural Effusions of Lung Cancer

Administered By
Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine
Awarded By
Chest Foundation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Known Medicine Pleural Fluid Samples

Administered By
Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine
Awarded By
Known Medicine
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Endobronchial coils for emphysema: Dual mechanism of action on lobar residual volume reduction.

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The RENEW trial demonstrated that bronchoscopic lung volume reduction using endobronchial coils improves quality of life, pulmonary function and exercise performance. In this post hoc analysis of RENEW, we examine the mechanism of action of endobronchial coils that drives improvement in clinical outcomes. METHODS: A total of 78 patients from the RENEW coil-treated group who were treated in one or both lobes that were deemed as the most destroyed were included in this retrospective analysis. Expiratory and inspiratory HRCT scans were used to assess lobar volume change from baseline to 12 months post coil treatment in treated and untreated lobes. RESULTS: Reduction in lobar RV in treated lobes was significantly associated with favourable clinical improvement. Independent predictor of the change in RV and FEV1 was the change in lobar RV reduction in the treated lobes and for change in 6MWD the absence of cardiac disease and the change in SGRQ, while the independent predictor of change in SGRQ was the change in 6MWD. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that residual lobar volume reduction in treated lobes measured by QCT is the driving mechanism of action of endobronchial coils leading to positive clinical outcomes. However, the improvement in exercise capacity and quality of life seems to be affected by the presence of cardiac disease.
Authors
Hartman, JE; Shah, PL; Sciurba, F; Herth, FJF; Slebos, D-J; RENEW Study Group,
MLA Citation
Hartman, Jorine E., et al. “Endobronchial coils for emphysema: Dual mechanism of action on lobar residual volume reduction.Respirology, vol. 25, no. 11, Nov. 2020, pp. 1160–66. Pubmed, doi:10.1111/resp.13816.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1469205
PMID
32267059
Source
pubmed
Published In
Respirology
Volume
25
Published Date
Start Page
1160
End Page
1166
DOI
10.1111/resp.13816

You Can't Improve What You Can't Measure: Smart Learning Meets Rigid Bronchoscopy.

Authors
MLA Citation
Mahmood, Kamran. “You Can't Improve What You Can't Measure: Smart Learning Meets Rigid Bronchoscopy.J Bronchology Interv Pulmonol, vol. 27, no. 4, Oct. 2020, pp. 227–28. Pubmed, doi:10.1097/LBR.0000000000000690.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1461438
PMID
32960858
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Bronchology Interv Pulmonol
Volume
27
Published Date
Start Page
227
End Page
228
DOI
10.1097/LBR.0000000000000690

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy to prevent central airway stenosis after lung transplantation.

BACKGROUND: Central airway stenosis (CAS) is a severe airway complication after lung transplantation associated with bronchial ischemia and necrosis. We sought to determine whether hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), an established treatment for tissue ischemia, attenuates post-transplant bronchial injury. METHODS: We performed a randomized, controlled trial comparing usual care with HBOT (2 atm absolute for 2 hours × 20 sessions) in subjects with extensive airway necrosis 4 weeks after transplantation. Endobronchial biopsies were collected at 4, 7, and 10 weeks after transplantation for a quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Coprimary outcomes were incidence of airway stenting and acute cellular rejection (ACR) at 1 year. RESULTS: The trial was stopped after enrolling 20 subjects (n = 10 per group) after a pre-planned interim analysis showed no difference between usual care and HBOT groups in stenting (both 40%), ACR (70% and 40%, respectively), or CAS (40% and 60%, respectively). Time to first stent placement (median [interquartile range]) was significantly shorter in the HBOT group (150 [73-150] vs 186 [167-206] days, p < 0.05). HIF gene expression was significantly increased in donor tissues at 4, 7, and 10 weeks after transplantation but was not altered by HBOT. Subjects who developed CAS or required stenting had significantly higher HMOX1 and VEGFA expression at 4 weeks (both p < 0.05). Subjects who developed ACR had significant FLT1, TIE2, and KDR expression at 4 weeks (all p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Incidence of CAS is high after severe, established airway necrosis after transplantation. HBOT does not reduce CAS severity or stenting. Elevated HMOX1 and VEGFA expressions appear to associate with airway complications.
Authors
MLA Citation
Kraft, Bryan D., et al. “Hyperbaric oxygen therapy to prevent central airway stenosis after lung transplantation.J Heart Lung Transplant, vol. 40, no. 4, Apr. 2021, pp. 269–78. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.healun.2021.01.008.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1473700
PMID
33518452
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Heart Lung Transplant
Volume
40
Published Date
Start Page
269
End Page
278
DOI
10.1016/j.healun.2021.01.008

Pilot Study of the Performance of 19-G Needle in Endobronchial Ultrasound-guided Transbronchial Aspiration for the Diagnosis and Testing of Molecular Markers in Lung Cancer.

BACKGROUND: Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) has become the standard for diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. Historically, 21- and 22-G needles have been paired with EBUS. We evaluated the performance of EBUS-TBNA using a larger 19-G needle in the assessment of tumor tissue obtained and success of testing for molecular markers. METHODS: We prospectively enrolled adult patients with lymphadenopathy concerning for metastatic lung cancer. Patients underwent diagnostic EBUS-TBNA utilizing 19-G needles. Cases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were evaluated for programmed cell death receptor ligand (PD-L1) expression. Cases of adenocarcinoma or undifferentiated NSCLC were further evaluated for 3 molecular markers for driver mutations: epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), c-ros oncogene 1 (ROS-1), and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). RESULTS: Fifty patients were enrolled and underwent EBUS-TBNA using 19-G needles. PD-L1 assay was successfully performed in 90% of NSCLC cases. In adenocarcinoma or undifferentiated NSCLC cases, the success rate in testing was 90% for EGFR and 86% for ALK. ROS-1 testing had a success rate of 67%; 24% of these specimens had adequate tumor cells but there was technical difficulty with the assay. Block quality was judged by total number of tumor cells per hematoxylin and eosin-stained slide of each cell block (58% of specimens had >500 cells and 22% had 200 to 500 cells). There were no adverse events. CONCLUSION: EBUS-TBNA using 19-G needles can obtain a high number of tumor cells and has a high rate of success in performing assays for PD-L1, EGFR, and ALK in NSCLC patients without an increase in adverse events. The success rate of ROS-1 testing was lower.
Authors
Wahidi, MM; Davidson, K; Shofer, S; Mahmood, K; Cheng, G; Giovacchini, C; Jones, C; Jug, R; Pavlisko, EN; Wang, X; Gu, L; Weimholt, C; Zhou, Z; Chen, A
MLA Citation
Wahidi, Momen M., et al. “Pilot Study of the Performance of 19-G Needle in Endobronchial Ultrasound-guided Transbronchial Aspiration for the Diagnosis and Testing of Molecular Markers in Lung Cancer.J Bronchology Interv Pulmonol, vol. Publish Ahead of Print, Dec. 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.1097/LBR.0000000000000736.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1468613
PMID
33273249
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Bronchology Interv Pulmonol
Volume
Publish Ahead of Print
Published Date
DOI
10.1097/LBR.0000000000000736

Operator Perception of a Single-Use Flexible Bronchoscope: Comparison With Current Standard Bronchoscopes.

BACKGROUND: Single-use flexible bronchoscopes have gained popularity in recent years for various advantages over the traditional reusable bronchoscope. There are several commercially available disposable bronchoscopes; however, all have limitations compared to reusable bronchoscopes. The Vathin H-SteriScope is a single-use flexible bronchoscope that may have overcome some of these limitations. METHODS: We designed a survey to evaluate the performance of this new single-use bronchoscope on a bronchoscopy model with operators who are familiar with current single-use and reusable bronchoscopes. The operators were asked to rank overall assessment, scope quality, handling, maneuverability, tool interaction, and image quality of the H-SteriScope on a scale of 0-100. These operators were then asked to rank their current single-use and reusable bronchoscopes with the same scale. The results were evaluated to determine the operator perception of the H-SteriScope. RESULTS: The H-SteriScope and current reusable bronchoscopes were perceived to have significant differences compared with currently available single-use bronchoscopes in overall assessment of the scope, scope quality, handling, maneuverability, tool interaction, and image quality (P < .001). The H-SteriScope was perceived to have similar maneuverability as the reusable bronchoscope (P = .86). There were no differences among the H-SteriScope (P = .88), the current single-use bronchoscope (P = .84), and the current reusable bronchoscope (P = .89) between the training and nontraining interventional pulmonology subgroups. CONCLUSIONS: In terms of operator perception, the H-SteriScope appears to have similar maneuverability as the reusable bronchoscope. Both the H-SteriScope and the reusable bronchoscopes performed better in all measured sectors than the current single-use bronchoscope. Additional studies are required to evaluate the practicality, safety, and cost efficiency of the H-SteriScope in clinical practice.
Authors
Liu, L; Wahidi, M; Mahmood, K; Giovacchini, C; Shofer, S; Cheng, G
MLA Citation
Liu, LiHua, et al. “Operator Perception of a Single-Use Flexible Bronchoscope: Comparison With Current Standard Bronchoscopes.Respir Care, vol. 65, no. 11, Nov. 2020, pp. 1655–62. Pubmed, doi:10.4187/respcare.07574.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1446823
PMID
32487752
Source
pubmed
Published In
Respir Care
Volume
65
Published Date
Start Page
1655
End Page
1662
DOI
10.4187/respcare.07574