Paul Martin

Overview:

For most of my career in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology I have focused on the use of stem cell transplant for the treatment of pediatric leukemias (ALL, AML, CML and JMML) and other non-malignant blood disorders, such as thalassemia, hemaphagocytic disorders, Wiskott-Aldrich, aplastic anemia, Diamond-Blackfan Anemia, as well as inherited metabolic diseases. In addition to focusing on determining the best use of stem cell transplants for these disorders, I have also been involved in clinical research investigating the prevention and treatment of transplant related morbidity, particularly veno-occlusive disease of the liver, infections and diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. As study chair for the Children's Oncology Group protocol 9904, I was involved in the development, implementation and analysis of a large, international frontline study of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Results from this study show that a significant number of children with certain favorable cytogenetic abnormalities in their leukemic cells and who have a rapid response to their initial chemotherapy can expect to have a >95% chance of cure when treated with relatively low intensity chemotherapy.  

For most of my time at Duke I have concentrated on providing high quality care for high risk leukemia patients who require high intensity therapies, such as stem cell transplant and immunotherapy.  As a member of the Pediatric Transplant and Cellular Therapy Division I provide clinical care for these patients.  As a member of various cooperative groups and local PI for several drug trials, I have worked to provide better care and more specific therapies for the toxicities associated with stem cell transplant.  

I have also collaborated with the Pediatric Immunology Division to provide a life-saving therapy for a small group of patients with thymic dysfunction, which causes severe immunodeficiency.  Our clinical team now provides support during these patients hospital admissions for donor thymus tissue implantation.

Positions:

Professor of Pediatrics

Pediatrics, Blood and Marrow Transplantation
School of Medicine

Chief, Division of Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplantation

Pediatrics, Blood and Marrow Transplantation
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1987

Washington University in St. Louis

Ph.D. 1987

Washington University in St. Louis

Intern, Pediatrics

Yale University

Resident, Pediatrics

Yale University

Fellow, Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Pediatrics

Yale University

Grants:

Pediatric Oncology Group (POG)

Administered By
Pediatrics, Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase II, single arm, multicenter trial to determine the efficacy and safety of CTL019 in pediatric patients with relapsed and refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Administered By
Pediatrics, Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Awarded By
Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase 3, Randomized, Adaptive Study Comparing the Efficacy and Safety of Defibrotide vs Best Supportive Care in the Prevention of Hepatic Veno-Occlusive Disease in Adult and Pediatric Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant

Administered By
Pediatrics, Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Awarded By
Jazz Pharmaceuticals
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

PBMTC SUP 1601 Pathogen Identification in Pediatric HSCT

Administered By
Pediatrics, Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Awarded By
Children's Hospital Los Angeles
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase 2 Multicenter Single arm Study of Moxetumomab Pasudotox in Pediatric Subjects with Relapsed or Refractory pALL

Administered By
Pediatrics, Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Awarded By
MedImmune, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Anaerobic Antibiotics and the Risk of Graft-versus-Host Disease after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

Certain anaerobic bacteria are important for maintenance of gut barrier integrity and immune tolerance and may influence the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We conducted a single-center retrospective cohort study of allogeneic HSCT recipients to evaluate associations between receipt of antibiotics with an anaerobic spectrum of activity and GVHD outcomes. We identified 1214 children and adults who developed febrile neutropenia between 7 days before and 28 days after HSCT and compared GVHD risk and mortality among patients who received anaerobic antibiotics (piperacillin-tazobactam or carbapenems; n = 491) to patients who received only antibiotics with minimal activity against anaerobes (aztreonam, cefepime, or ceftazidime; n = 723). We performed metagenomic sequencing of serial fecal samples from 36 pediatric patients to compare the effects of specific antibiotics on the gut metagenome. Receipt of anaerobic antibiotics was associated with higher hazards of acute gut/liver GVHD (hazard ratio [HR], 1.26; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03 to 1.54) and acute GVHD mortality (HR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.08 to 2.46), but not chronic GVHD diagnosis (HR, 1.04; 95% CI: .84 to 1.28) or chronic GVHD mortality (HR, .88; 95% CI, .53 to 1.45). Anaerobic antibiotics resulted in decreased gut bacterial diversity, reduced abundances of Bifidobacteriales and Clostridiales, and loss of bacterial genes encoding butyrate biosynthesis enzymes from the gut metagenome. Acute gut/liver GVHD was preceded by a sharp decline in bacterial butyrate biosynthesis genes with antibiotic treatment. Our findings demonstrate that exposure to anaerobic antibiotics is associated with increased risks of acute gut/liver GVHD and acute GVHD mortality after allogeneic HSCT. Use of piperacillin-tazobactam or carbapenems should be reserved for febrile neutropenia cases in which anaerobic or multidrug-resistant infections are suspected.
Authors
Tanaka, JS; Young, RR; Heston, SM; Jenkins, K; Spees, LP; Sung, AD; Corbet, K; Thompson, JC; Bohannon, L; Martin, PL; Stokhuyzen, A; Vinesett, R; Ward, DV; Bhattarai, SK; Bucci, V; Arshad, M; Seed, PC; Kelly, MS
MLA Citation
Tanaka, John S., et al. “Anaerobic Antibiotics and the Risk of Graft-versus-Host Disease after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.Biol Blood Marrow Transplant, July 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.bbmt.2020.07.011.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1452203
PMID
32682948
Source
pubmed
Published In
Biol Blood Marrow Transplant
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.bbmt.2020.07.011

Outcomes Of Matched Related Donor Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation In Pediatric Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome

Authors
Parikh, SH; Martin, PL; Prasad, VK; Szabolcs, P; Ciocci, G; Driscoll, TA; Kurtzberg, J
MLA Citation
Parikh, S. H., et al. “Outcomes Of Matched Related Donor Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation In Pediatric Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome.” Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, vol. 16, no. 2, Elsevier BV, 2010, pp. S248–49. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.bbmt.2009.12.282.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1452274
Source
crossref
Published In
Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation : Journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Volume
16
Published Date
Start Page
S248
End Page
S249
DOI
10.1016/j.bbmt.2009.12.282

Correction Of Immune Defect, Excellent Survival, And Long-Term Donor Chimerism In Children With Chronic Granulomatous Disease After Myeloablative Transplantation Across Donor And Graft Sources

Authors
Tewari, P; Martin, PL; Parikh, SH; Szabolcs, P; Page, KM; Driscoll, TA; Kurtzberg, J; Prasad, VK
MLA Citation
Tewari, P., et al. “Correction Of Immune Defect, Excellent Survival, And Long-Term Donor Chimerism In Children With Chronic Granulomatous Disease After Myeloablative Transplantation Across Donor And Graft Sources.” Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, vol. 16, no. 2, Elsevier BV, 2010, pp. S185–S185. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.bbmt.2009.12.104.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1452275
Source
crossref
Published In
Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation : Journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Volume
16
Published Date
Start Page
S185
End Page
S185
DOI
10.1016/j.bbmt.2009.12.104

Outcomes of Second Transplants for Patients with Hematological Malignancies Who Relapse after First Transplant: A Retrospective Analysis of a Single Institution Experience

Authors
Stafford, L; Troy, JD; Driscoll, TA; Page, K; Parikh, S; Prasad, VK; Kurtzberg, J; Martin, PL
MLA Citation
Stafford, Lauren, et al. “Outcomes of Second Transplants for Patients with Hematological Malignancies Who Relapse after First Transplant: A Retrospective Analysis of a Single Institution Experience.” Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, vol. 23, no. 3, 2017, pp. S152–S152.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1452273
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation : Journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Volume
23
Published Date
Start Page
S152
End Page
S152

Successful Engraftment of Umbilical Cord Blood (UCB) Cells after Co-Transplantation of Nicord (R) (Ex Vivo Expanded UCB Progenitor Cells with Nicotinamide) and an Unmanipulated UCB Unit after Myeloablative Chemotherapy in Severe Sickle Cell Disease

Authors
Parikh, S; Brochstein, J; Martin, PL; Horwitz, ME; Galamidi, E; Peleg, I; Goshen, U; Schwarzbach, A; Snyder, D; Peled, T; Kurtzberg, J
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1452357
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation : Journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Volume
23
Published Date
Start Page
S150
End Page
S151