Shannon McCall

Overview:

As Vice Chair for Translational Research in the Department of Pathology, I am involved in numerous translational cancer research projects that rely on the study of human biological samples.  I am the director of the Duke BioRepository & Precision Pathology Center (Duke BRPC), a shared resource of the School of Medicine and the Duke Cancer Institute.  I serve as the PI for the National Cancer Institute's Cooperative Human Tissue Network Southern Division (a five-year UM1 grant), which lives in the Duke BRPC.  My own area of research interest is gastrointestinal tract metaplasias and their relationship to carcinogenesis, particularly in the upper GI tract.

Positions:

Associate Professor of Pathology

Pathology
School of Medicine

Associate Professor in Surgery

Surgery, Surgical Sciences
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.S. 1996

North Carolina State University

M.D. 2000

Duke University

Anatomic and Clinical Pathology, American Board of Pathology (ABPath)

American Board of Pathology

Clinical Informatics, American Board of Pathology (ABPath)

American Board of Pathology

Resident, Pathology

Duke University

Chief Resident, Pathology

Duke University

Grants:

Cooperative Human Tissue Network Support through Duke's BioRepository & Precision Pathology Center

Administered By
Pathology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

The genetics of hepatosplenic T cell lymphoma

Administered By
Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Empowering Duke's Precision Pathology Center with Quantitative Image Analysis to Support Discovery, Diagnostic Assay Development, and Immune Cell Monitoring

Administered By
Pathology
Awarded By
North Carolina Biotechnology Center
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Validation of Molecular Signatures of Prognosis

Administered By
Surgery, Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery
Awarded By
University of Colorado - Denver
Role
Pathologist
Start Date
End Date

Duke BRPC sub-contract with Leidos Biomed for NCI CPTAC III (Option1)

Administered By
Pathology
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Plasma cells are essentially absent in the luminal gastrointestinal tract of patients with "complete" 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (DiGeorge syndrome).

Gastrointestinal symptoms are commonly reported in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome or DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) in addition to the dominant cardiac manifestations and immunodeficiency. But literature providing specific morphologic details of the gastrointestinal tract pathology is very limited. Here, we provide the first comprehensive morphologic description of the luminal gastrointestinal tract changes in patients with DGS. Cytogenetically confirmed DGS patients were identified, clinical and laboratory data were reviewed to determine the severity of immunodeficiency, and patients were stratified into mildly immunocompromised, that is, partial DiGeorge anomaly or severely immunosuppressed, that is, complete DiGeorge anomaly groups. Gastrointestinal tract biopsies from these patients were retrospectively reviewed and compared with those from controls without the history of DGS. Patients with immunosuppressed DGS showed a near complete absence of plasma cells in the stomach, duodenum, and colon lamina propria by hematoxylin and eosin evaluation. Immunohistochemistry for CD138 used to highlight plasma cells confirmed this finding. The notable absence of plasma cells adds to the existing knowledge of the pathophysiology underlying DGS and expands the differential diagnostic considerations for this finding, which has been previously described in common variable immunodeficiency. It also provides a useful morphologic marker observable by the readily accessible light microscopy. Second, patients with DGS showed a mild increase in epithelial cell apoptosis in their colon. This finding is significant because of its overlap with morphologic features of gastrointestinal graft versus host disease as thymus transplantation is being used as a treatment option for patients with complete DGS.
Authors
Pendse, AA; Maule, JG; Neff, JL; McCall, S
MLA Citation
Pendse, Avani A., et al. “Plasma cells are essentially absent in the luminal gastrointestinal tract of patients with "complete" 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (DiGeorge syndrome).Hum Pathol, vol. 117, Nov. 2021, pp. 1–8. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.humpath.2021.08.002.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1494123
PMID
34391747
Source
pubmed
Published In
Hum Pathol
Volume
117
Published Date
Start Page
1
End Page
8
DOI
10.1016/j.humpath.2021.08.002

Next-Generation Sequencing Concordance Analysis of Comprehensive Solid Tumor Profiling between a Centralized Specialty Laboratory and the Decentralized Personal Genome Diagnostics elio Tissue Complete Kitted Solution.

Genomic tumor profiling by next-generation sequencing (NGS) allows for large-scale tumor testing to inform targeted cancer therapies and immunotherapies, and to identify patients for clinical trials. These tests are often underutilized in patients with late-stage solid tumors and are typically performed in centralized specialty laboratories, thereby limiting access to these complex tests. Personal Genome Diagnostics Inc., elio tissue complete NGS solution is a comprehensive DNA-to-report kitted assay and bioinformatics solution. Comparison of 147 unique specimens from >20 tumor types was performed using the elio tissue complete solution and Foundation Medicine's FoundationOne test, which is of similar size and gene content. The analytical performance of all genomic variant types was evaluated. In general, the overall mutational profile is highly concordant between the two assays, with agreement in sequence variants reported between panels demonstrating >95% positive percentage agreement for single-nucleotide variants and insertions/deletions in clinically actionable genes. Both copy number alterations and gene translocations showed 80% to 83% positive percentage agreement, whereas tumor mutation burden and microsatellite status showed a high level of concordance across a range of mutation loads and tumor types. The Personal Genome Diagnostics Inc., elio tissue complete assay is comparable to the FoundationOne test and will allow more laboratories to offer a diagnostic NGS assay in house, which will ultimately reduce time to result and increase the number of patients receiving molecular genomic profiling and personalized treatment.
Authors
Deak, KL; Jackson, JB; Valkenburg, KC; Keefer, LA; Robinson Gerding, KM; Angiuoli, SV; Datto, MB; McCall, SJ
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1489694
PMID
34314880
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Mol Diagn
Volume
23
Published Date
Start Page
1324
End Page
1333
DOI
10.1016/j.jmoldx.2021.07.004

Expression of X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (XIAP) in Breast Cancer Is Associated with Shorter Survival and Resistance to Chemotherapy.

XIAP, the most potent inhibitor of cell death pathways, is linked to chemotherapy resistance and tumor aggressiveness. Currently, multiple XIAP-targeting agents are in clinical trials. However, the characterization of XIAP expression in relation to clinicopathological variables in large clinical series of breast cancer is lacking. We retrospectively analyzed non-metastatic, non-inflammatory, primary, invasive breast cancer samples for XIAP mRNA (n = 2341) and protein (n = 367) expression. XIAP expression was analyzed as a continuous value and correlated with clinicopathological variables. XIAP mRNA expression was heterogeneous across samples and significantly associated with younger patients' age (≤50 years), pathological ductal type, lower tumor grade, node-positive status, HR+/HER2- status, and PAM50 luminal B subtype. Higher XIAP expression was associated with shorter DFS in uni- and multivariate analyses in 909 informative patients. Very similar correlations were observed at the protein level. This prognostic impact was significant in the HR+/HER2- but not in the TN subtype. Finally, XIAP mRNA expression was associated with lower pCR rate to anthracycline-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy in both uni- and multivariate analyses in 1203 informative patients. Higher XIAP expression in invasive breast cancer is independently associated with poorer prognosis and resistance to chemotherapy, suggesting the potential therapeutic benefit of targeting XIAP.
Authors
Devi, GR; Finetti, P; Morse, MA; Lee, S; de Nonneville, A; Van Laere, S; Troy, J; Geradts, J; McCall, S; Bertucci, F
MLA Citation
Devi, Gayathri R., et al. “Expression of X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (XIAP) in Breast Cancer Is Associated with Shorter Survival and Resistance to Chemotherapy.Cancers (Basel), vol. 13, no. 11, June 2021. Pubmed, doi:10.3390/cancers13112807.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1484291
PMID
34199946
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancers
Volume
13
Published Date
DOI
10.3390/cancers13112807

X-ray fan beam coded aperture transmission and diffraction imaging for fast material analysis.

X-ray transmission imaging has been used in a variety of applications for high-resolution measurements based on shape and density. Similarly, X-ray diffraction (XRD) imaging has been used widely for molecular structure-based identification of materials. Combining these X-ray methods has the potential to provide high-resolution material identification, exceeding the capabilities of either modality alone. However, XRD imaging methods have been limited in application by their long measurement times and poor spatial resolution, which has generally precluded combined, rapid measurements of X-ray transmission and diffraction. In this work, we present a novel X-ray fan beam coded aperture transmission and diffraction imaging system, developed using commercially available components, for rapid and accurate non-destructive imaging of industrial and biomedical specimens. The imaging system uses a 160 kV Bremsstrahlung X-ray source while achieving a spatial resolution of ≈ 1 × 1 mm2 and a spectral accuracy of > 95% with only 15 s exposures per 150 mm fan beam slice. Applications of this technology are reported in geological imaging, pharmaceutical inspection, and medical diagnosis. The performance of the imaging system indicates improved material differentiation relative to transmission imaging alone at scan times suitable for a variety of industrial and biomedical applications.
Authors
Stryker, S; Greenberg, JA; McCall, SJ; Kapadia, AJ
MLA Citation
Stryker, Stefan, et al. “X-ray fan beam coded aperture transmission and diffraction imaging for fast material analysis.Sci Rep, vol. 11, no. 1, May 2021, p. 10585. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41598-021-90163-0.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1483171
PMID
34012075
Source
pubmed
Published In
Scientific Reports
Volume
11
Published Date
Start Page
10585
DOI
10.1038/s41598-021-90163-0

Implementation of a Molecular Tumor Registry to Support the Adoption of Precision Oncology Within an Academic Medical Center: The Duke University Experience.

Comprehensive genomic profiling to inform targeted therapy selection is a central part of oncology care. However, the volume and complexity of alterations uncovered through genomic profiling make it difficult for oncologists to choose the most appropriate therapy for their patients. Here, we present a solution to this problem, The Molecular Registry of Tumors (MRT) and our Molecular Tumor Board (MTB). PATIENTS AND METHODS: MRT is an internally developed system that aggregates and normalizes genomic profiling results from multiple sources. MRT serves as the foundation for our MTB, a team that reviews genomic results for all Duke University Health System cancer patients, provides notifications for targeted therapies, matches patients to biomarker-driven trials, and monitors the molecular landscape of tumors at our institution. RESULTS: Among 215 patients reviewed by our MTB over a 6-month period, we identified 176 alterations associated with therapeutic sensitivity, 15 resistance alterations, and 51 alterations with potential germline implications. Of reviewed patients, 17% were subsequently treated with a targeted therapy. For 12 molecular therapies approved during the course of this work, we identified between two and 71 patients who could qualify for treatment based on retrospective MRT data. An analysis of 14 biomarker-driven clinical trials found that MRT successfully identified 42% of patients who ultimately enrolled. Finally, an analysis of 4,130 comprehensive genomic profiles from 3,771 patients revealed that the frequency of clinically significant therapeutic alterations varied from approximately 20% to 70% depending on the tumor type and sequencing test used. CONCLUSION: With robust informatics tools, such as MRT, and the right MTB structure, a precision cancer medicine program can be developed, which provides great benefit to providers and patients with cancer.
Authors
Green, MF; Bell, JL; Hubbard, CB; McCall, SJ; McKinney, MS; Riedel, JE; Menendez, CS; Abbruzzese, JL; Strickler, JH; Datto, MB
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1497103
PMID
34568718
Source
pubmed
Published In
Jco Precision Oncology
Volume
5
Published Date
DOI
10.1200/PO.21.00030

Research Areas:

Ampulla of Vater
Apoptosis
Bevacizumab
Bile Ducts
Biological Markers
Biopsy
Biopsy, Needle
Cell Differentiation
Cell Line
Cell Nucleus
Cell Proliferation
Cell Survival
Cells, Cultured
Colorectal Neoplasms
Colorectal Neoplasms, Hereditary Nonpolyposis
Cytochrome P-450 CYP2E1
Endocytosis
Epithelial Cells
Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition
Gene Deletion
Gene Expression Profiling
Gene Expression Regulation
Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Hedgehog Proteins
Homeodomain Proteins
Humans
Hydroxyproline
Immunohistochemistry
Kruppel-Like Transcription Factors
Lasers
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Mesoderm
Microdissection
Mutation
Nuclear Proteins
Oligonucleotides, Antisense
Oligoribonucleotides, Antisense
Oncogenes
Organoplatinum Compounds
Pancreaticoduodenectomy
Pancreatitis
Pilot Projects
Prognosis
Protein Isoforms
Proteome
Proto-Oncogene Proteins
Proto-Oncogene Proteins B-raf
Pyrimidines
RNA, Messenger
Receptors, Cell Surface
Recombinant Proteins
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Signal Transduction
Stromal Cells
Thiazoles
Tissue Donors
Tumor Markers, Biological
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Wnt Proteins
Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
ras Proteins