Patricia Moorman

Overview:

Dr. Moorman's research focuses on the epidemiology of women's health issues. Her work includes research on ovarian cancer, breast cancer and hysterectomy. Areas of particular interest include disparities in cancer risk factors and outcomes and the effects of hysterectomy on ovarian function.  As part of the Duke Evidence Synthesis group, she has also been involved in systematic reviews and meta-analyses related to ovarian cancer, breast cancer and infertility.

Positions:

Professor in Family Medicine and Community Health

Family Medicine and Community Health, Prevention Research
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.S.P.H. 1989

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Ph.D. 1993

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Grants:

The Epidemiology of Ovarian Cancer in African American Women

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Epidemiology of Ovarian Cancer in African-American Women

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

The Molecular Epidemiology Of Ovarian Cancer

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Carolina and Georgia Genetics Network Center

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Carolina and Georgia Genetics Network Center

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Novel genetic variants in HDAC2 and PPARGC1A of the CREB-binding protein pathway predict survival of non-small-cell lung cancer.

The CREB-binding protein (CBP) pathway plays an important role in transcription and activity of acetyltransferase that acetylates lysine residues of histones and nonhistone proteins. In the present study, we hypothesized that genetic variants in the CBP pathway genes played a role in survival of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We tested this hypothesis using the genotyping data from the genome-wide association study (GWAS) dataset from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. In the single-locus analysis, we evaluated associations between 13 176 (1107 genotyped and 12 069 imputed) single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 72 genes and survival of 1185 patients with NSCLC. The identified 106 significant SNPs in the discovery were further validated in additional genotyping data from another GWAS dataset of 984 patients with NSCLC in the Harvard Lung Cancer Susceptibility Study. The combined results of two datasets showed that two independent, potentially functional SNPs (i.e., HDAC2 rs13213007G>A and PPARGC1A rs60571065T>A) were significantly associated with NSCLC overall survival, with a combined hazards ratio (HR) of 1.26 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09-1.45; P = .002) and 1.23 (1.04-1.47; P = .017), respectively. Furthermore, we performed an expression quantitative trait loci analysis and found that the survival-associated HDAC2 rs13213007A allele (GA+AA), but not PPARGC1A rs60571065A allele (TA+AA), was significantly associated with increased messenger RNA expression levels of HDAC2 in 373 lymphoblastoid cell lines. These results indicate that the HDAC2 rs13213007A allele is a potential predictor of NSCLC survival, likely by altering the HDAC2 expression.
Authors
Tang, D; Zhao, YC; Qian, D; Liu, H; Luo, S; Patz, EF; Moorman, PG; Su, L; Shen, S; Christiani, DC; Glass, C; Gao, W; Wei, Q
MLA Citation
Tang, Dongfang, et al. “Novel genetic variants in HDAC2 and PPARGC1A of the CREB-binding protein pathway predict survival of non-small-cell lung cancer..” Mol Carcinog, vol. 59, no. 1, Jan. 2020, pp. 104–15. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/mc.23132.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1421667
PMID
31713888
Source
pubmed
Published In
Molecular Carcinogenesis
Volume
59
Published Date
Start Page
104
End Page
115
DOI
10.1002/mc.23132

Prediagnostic Proinflammatory Dietary Potential Is Associated with All-Cause Mortality among African-American Women with High-Grade Serous Ovarian Carcinoma.

BACKGROUND: Chronic inflammation is associated with ovarian carcinogenesis; yet, the impact of inflammatory-related exposures on outcomes has been understudied. OBJECTIVE: Given the poor survival of women diagnosed with ovarian cancer, especially African-Americans, we examined whether diet-associated inflammation, a modifiable source of chronic systemic inflammation measured by the dietary inflammatory index (DII), was associated with all-cause mortality among African-American women with ovarian carcinoma. METHODS: Data were available from 490 ovarian carcinoma patients enrolled in a population-based case-control study of African-American women with ovarian cancer, the African-American Cancer Epidemiology Study. Energy-adjusted DII (E-DII) scores were calculated based on prediagnostic dietary intake of foods alone or foods and supplements, which was self-reported using the 2005 Block Food Frequency Questionnaire. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate risk of mortality overall and for the most common histotype, high-grade serous carcinoma. Additionally, we assessed interaction by age at diagnosis and smoking status. RESULTS: Women included in this study had a median age of 57 y, and the majority of women were obese (58%), had late-stage disease (Stage III or IV, 66%), and had high-grade serous carcinoma (64%). Greater E-DII scores including supplements (indicating greater inflammatory potential) were associated with an increased risk of mortality among women with high-grade serous carcinoma (HR1-unit change: 1.08; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.17). Similar associations were observed for the E-DII excluding supplements, although not statistically significant (HR1-unit change: 1.07; 95% CI: 0.97, 1.17). There was an interaction by smoking status, where the positive association with mortality was present only among ever smokers (HRQuartile 4/Quartile 1: 2.36; 95% CI: 1.21, 4.60) but not among never smokers. CONCLUSIONS: Greater inflammatory potential of prediagnostic diet may adversely impact prognosis among African-American women with high-grade serous carcinoma, and specifically among ever smokers.
Authors
Peres, LC; Hebert, JR; Qin, B; Guertin, KA; Bandera, EV; Shivappa, N; Camacho, TF; Chyn, D; Alberg, AJ; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Bondy, ML; Cote, ML; Funkhouser, E; Moorman, PG; Peters, ES; Schwartz, AG; Terry, PD; Schildkraut, JM
MLA Citation
Peres, Lauren C., et al. “Prediagnostic Proinflammatory Dietary Potential Is Associated with All-Cause Mortality among African-American Women with High-Grade Serous Ovarian Carcinoma..” J Nutr, vol. 149, no. 9, Sept. 2019, pp. 1606–16. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/jn/nxz098.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1388101
PMID
31152675
Source
pubmed
Published In
The Journal of Nutrition
Volume
149
Published Date
Start Page
1606
End Page
1616
DOI
10.1093/jn/nxz098

Identification of novel epithelial ovarian cancer loci in women of African ancestry.

Women of African ancestry have lower incidence of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) yet worse survival compared to women of European ancestry. We conducted a genome-wide association study in African ancestry women with 755 EOC cases, including 537 high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSOC) and 1,235 controls. We identified four novel loci with suggestive evidence of association with EOC (p < 1 × 10-6 ), including rs4525119 (intronic to AKR1C3), rs7643459 (intronic to LOC101927394), rs4286604 (12 kb 3' of UGT2A2) and rs142091544 (5 kb 5' of WWC1). For HGSOC, we identified six loci with suggestive evidence of association including rs37792 (132 kb 5' of follistatin [FST]), rs57403204 (81 kb 3' of MAGEC1), rs79079890 (LOC105376360 intronic), rs66459581 (5 kb 5' of PRPSAP1), rs116046250 (GABRG3 intronic) and rs192876988 (32 kb 3' of GK2). Among the identified variants, two are near genes known to regulate hormones and diseases of the ovary (AKR1C3 and FST), and two are linked to cancer (AKR1C3 and MAGEC1). In follow-up studies of the 10 identified variants, the GK2 region SNP, rs192876988, showed an inverse association with EOC in European ancestry women (p = 0.002), increased risk of ER positive breast cancer in African ancestry women (p = 0.027) and decreased expression of GK2 in HGSOC tissue from African ancestry women (p = 0.004). A European ancestry-derived polygenic risk score showed positive associations with EOC and HGSOC in women of African ancestry suggesting shared genetic architecture. Our investigation presents evidence of variants for EOC shared among European and African ancestry women and identifies novel EOC risk loci in women of African ancestry.
Authors
Manichaikul, A; Peres, LC; Wang, X-Q; Barnard, ME; Chyn, D; Sheng, X; Du, Z; Tyrer, J; Dennis, J; Schwartz, AG; Cote, ML; Peters, E; Moorman, PG; Bondy, M; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Terry, P; Alberg, AJ; Bandera, EV; Funkhouser, E; Wu, AH; Pearce, CL; Pike, M; Setiawan, VW; Haiman, CA; African American Breast Cancer Consortium (AABC),; African Ancestry Prostate Cancer Consortium (AAPC),; Palmer, JR; LeMarchand, L; Wilkens, LR; Berchuck, A; Doherty, JA; Modugno, F; Ness, R; Moysich, K; Karlan, BY; Whittemore, AS; McGuire, V; Sieh, W; Lawrenson, K; Gayther, S; Sellers, TA; Pharoah, P; Schildkraut, JM; African American Cancer Epidemiology Study (AACES) and the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC),
MLA Citation
Manichaikul, Ani, et al. “Identification of novel epithelial ovarian cancer loci in women of African ancestry..” Int J Cancer, Aug. 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/ijc.32653.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1406420
PMID
31469419
Source
pubmed
Published In
Int J Cancer
Published Date
DOI
10.1002/ijc.32653

Abstract 3294: Urinary estrogen metabolites and long-term all-cause and cause-specific mortality following breast cancer diagnosis: A population-based study

Authors
Wang, T; Bradshaw, PB; Nyante, SJ; Nichols, HB; Moorman, PG; Kabat, GC; Teitelbaum, SL; Neugut, AI; Gammon, MD
MLA Citation
Wang, Tengteng, et al. “Abstract 3294: Urinary estrogen metabolites and long-term all-cause and cause-specific mortality following breast cancer diagnosis: A population-based study.” Epidemiology, American Association for Cancer Research, 2019. Crossref, doi:10.1158/1538-7445.sabcs18-3294.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1417368
Source
crossref
Published In
Epidemiology
Published Date
DOI
10.1158/1538-7445.sabcs18-3294

Perceived discrimination, trust in physicians, and prolonged symptom duration before ovarian cancer diagnosis in the African American Cancer Epidemiology Study.

BACKGROUND: Discrimination and trust are known barriers to accessing health care. Despite well-documented racial disparities in the ovarian cancer care continuum, the role of these barriers has not been examined. This study evaluated the association of everyday discrimination and trust in physicians with a prolonged interval between symptom onset and ovarian cancer diagnosis (hereafter referred to as prolonged symptom duration). METHODS: Subjects included cases enrolled in the African American Cancer Epidemiology Study, a multisite case-control study of epithelial ovarian cancer among black women. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations of everyday discrimination and trust in physicians with a prolonged symptom duration (1 or more symptoms lasting longer than the median symptom-specific duration), and it controlled for access-to-care covariates and potential confounders. RESULTS: Among the 486 cases in this analysis, 302 women had prolonged symptom duration. In the fully adjusted model, a 1-unit increase in the frequency of everyday discrimination increased the odds of prolonged symptom duration 74% (OR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.22-2.49), but trust in physicians was not associated with prolonged symptom duration (OR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.66-1.11). CONCLUSIONS: Perceived everyday discrimination was associated with prolonged symptom duration, whereas more commonly evaluated determinants of access to care and trust in physicians were not. These results suggest that more research on the effects of interpersonal barriers affecting ovarian cancer care is warranted.
Authors
Mullins, MA; Peres, LC; Alberg, AJ; Bandera, EV; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Bondy, ML; Funkhouser, E; Moorman, PG; Peters, ES; Terry, PD; Schwartz, AG; Lawson, AB; Schildkraut, JM; Cote, ML
MLA Citation
Mullins, Megan A., et al. “Perceived discrimination, trust in physicians, and prolonged symptom duration before ovarian cancer diagnosis in the African American Cancer Epidemiology Study..” Cancer, vol. 125, no. 24, Dec. 2019, pp. 4442–51. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cncr.32451.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1404097
PMID
31415710
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Volume
125
Published Date
Start Page
4442
End Page
4451
DOI
10.1002/cncr.32451

Research Areas:

3-Oxo-5-alpha-Steroid 4-Dehydrogenase
Acetaminophen
Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing
Adenocarcinoma
Adenocarcinoma, Clear Cell
Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous
Adult
African Americans
African Continental Ancestry Group
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Alcohol Drinking
Alleles
Amino Acid Substitution
Analysis of Variance
Anthropometry
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal
Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins
BRCA1 Protein
BRCA2 Protein
Base Sequence
Bayes Theorem
Biopsy, Needle
Body Constitution
Body Mass Index
Body Size
Bone Diseases, Metabolic
Brain Neoplasms
Breast
Breast Feeding
Breast Neoplasms
Calcium, Dietary
Carbon-Nitrogen Ligases
Carcinoma
Cardiovascular Diseases
Case-Control Studies
Caspase 8
Chemoprevention
Chemotherapy
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 19
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 5
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 9
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms
Colonoscopy
Colorectal Neoplasms
Colorectal Neoplasms, Hereditary Nonpolyposis
Computer Communication Networks
Confidence Intervals
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Contraception
Contraceptives, Oral
Contraceptives, Oral, Hormonal
Cooperative Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Curriculum
Cyclin E
Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p16
Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous
Cytochrome P-450 CYP3A
DNA
DNA (Cytosine-5-)-Methyltransferase
DNA (Cytosine-5-)-Methyltransferases
DNA Damage
DNA Ligases
DNA Mutational Analysis
DNA Repair
DNA-Binding Proteins
Dairy Products
Data Collection
Demography
Diabetes
Diabetes Mellitus
Diet
Dietary Fats
Dietary Supplements
Dihydrouracil Dehydrogenase (NADP)
Drug Administration Schedule
Eczema
Educational Status
Effect Modifier, Epidemiologic
Endometrial Neoplasms
Endometriosis
Environment
Environmental Exposure
Epidemiologic Research Design
Epidemiologic Studies
Epithelial Cells
Estrogen Receptor Modulators
Estrogen Receptor alpha
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Estrogens
Europe
European Continental Ancestry Group
Exercise
Exons
Faculty, Medical
False Positive Reactions
Family
Female
Female Urogenital Diseases
Focus Groups
Folic Acid
Follicle Stimulating Hormone
Follow-Up Studies
Food Contamination
Gene Expression Profiling
Gene Frequency
Gene-Environment Interaction
Genes, BRCA1
Genes, p53
Genetic Heterogeneity
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Variation
Genome, Human
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Georgia
Glioma
Glycoproteins
Guidelines as Topic
Haplotypes
Health Behavior
Health Resources
Health Services Accessibility
Health Status
Heart Diseases
Heterozygote
Homozygote
Hormone Replacement Therapy
Hormones
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
Hyperplasia
Hypersensitivity
Hypertension
Hysterectomy
Immunohistochemistry
Incidence
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 1
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
Insulin-Like Growth Factor II
Interleukin-18
International Cooperation
Interviews as Topic
Isoenzymes
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Keratin-5
Keratin-6
Keratins
Leiomyoma
Life Style
Linear Models
Linkage Disequilibrium
Logistic Models
Loss of Heterozygosity
Lymph Node Excision
Lymph Nodes
Lymphatic Metastasis
Lymphedema
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Mammography
Maternal Age
Medical History Taking
Medical Records
Menarche
Menopause
Menstrual Cycle
Menstruation Disturbances
Methylenetetrahydrofolate Dehydrogenase (NADP)
Middle Aged
Minority Groups
Models, Statistical
Molecular Epidemiology
Molecular Sequence Data
Multivariate Analysis
Mutation
National Health Programs
Needs Assessment
Neoplasm Grading
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Neoplasm Proteins
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
Neoplasm Staging
Neoplasms
Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced
Nerve Tissue Proteins
Netherlands
Neuropeptides
New Jersey
North Carolina
Nuclear Proteins
Obesity
Odds Ratio
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
Ovarian Neoplasms
Ovary
Ovulation
Oxidative Stress
Pain
Parity
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patient Education as Topic
Patient Participation
Patient Selection
Pedigree
Peptides
Peritoneal Neoplasms
Pesticides
Phenotype
Physical Fitness
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Polymorphism, Single-Stranded Conformational
Population Surveillance
Postmenopause
Postoperative Complications
Pregnancy
Premenopause
Prevalence
Primary Ovarian Insufficiency
Probability
Progestins
Prognosis
Promoter Regions, Genetic
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Prostate-Specific Antigen
Prostatic Neoplasms
Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Race
Radiation, Ionizing
Radiotherapy
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor
Receptor, erbB-2
Receptors, Androgen
Receptors, Estrogen
Receptors, Progesterone
Recreation
Registries
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Reproductive History
Research
Residence Characteristics
Retinoblastoma Protein
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Risk Assessment
Risk Factors
Risk Management
Risk Reduction Behavior
Severity of Illness Index
Social Class
Societies, Medical
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics as Topic
Surveys and Questionnaires
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Survivors
Telomerase
Thymidylate Synthase
Time Factors
Transforming Growth Factor beta1
Treatment Outcome
Trinucleotide Repeats
Tumor Cells, Cultured
Tumor Markers, Biological
Tumor Suppressor Protein p53
United States
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Uterine Neoplasms
Veterans
Vitamin D
Weight Gain
Women's Health
Young Adult