Evan Myers

Overview:

My research interests are broadly in the application of quantitative methods, especially mathematical modeling and decision analysis, to problems in women's health. Recent and current activities include integration of simulation modeling and systematic reviews to inform decisions surrounding cervical, ovarian, and breast cancer prevention and control, screening for postpartum depression, and management of uterine fibroids.    We are also engaged in exploring methods for integrating guidelines development and research prioritization.    In addition, I have ongoing collaborations using the tools of decision analysis with faculty in other clinical areas  Research is conducted through the Division of Reproductive Sciences in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the Evidence Synthesis Group in the Duke Clinical Research Institute, and the Duke Cancer Institute.  I'm also the course director for CRP 259, "Decision Sciences in Clinical Research", in Duke's Clinical Research Training Program.

Positions:

Walter L. Thomas Distinguished Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology in the School of Medicine

Obstetrics and Gynecology, Reproductive Sciences
School of Medicine

Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Obstetrics and Gynecology, Reproductive Sciences
School of Medicine

Chief of the Division of Clinical & Epidemiologic Research

Obstetrics and Gynecology
School of Medicine

Affiliate Faculty Member, Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy

Duke - Margolis Center For Health Policy
Institutes and Provost's Academic Units

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Member in the Duke Clinical Research Institute

Duke Clinical Research Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1988

University of Pennsylvania

M.P.H. 1992

University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

House Staff - Resident, Ob/Gyn

Duke University

Associate, Ob/Gyn

Duke University

Grants:

Pregnancy and Response to Antiretroviral Therapy in South Africa

Administered By
Duke Global Health Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Advisor
Start Date
End Date

Genomics Tests for Ovarian Cancer Detection and Management

Administered By
Institutes and Centers
Awarded By
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Comparison of Operative to Medical Endocrine Therapy (COMET) for Low Risk DCIS

Awarded By
Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology Foundation
Role
Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Topic Refinement 2015

Administered By
Duke Clinical Research Institute
Awarded By
Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

PCORI_Triage and FR Prioritization - Amendment #3

Administered By
Duke Clinical Research Institute
Awarded By
Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Publisher Correction: Genome-wide association of polycystic ovary syndrome implicates alterations in gonadotropin secretion in European ancestry populations.

An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Authors
Hayes, MG; Urbanek, M; Ehrmann, DA; Armstrong, LL; Lee, JY; Sisk, R; Karaderi, T; Barber, TM; McCarthy, MI; Franks, S; Lindgren, CM; Welt, CK; Diamanti-Kandarakis, E; Panidis, D; Goodarzi, MO; Azziz, R; Zhang, Y; James, RG; Olivier, M; Kissebah, AH; Reproductive Medicine Network,; Stener-Victorin, E; Legro, RS; Dunaif, A
MLA Citation
Hayes, M. Geoffrey, et al. “Publisher Correction: Genome-wide association of polycystic ovary syndrome implicates alterations in gonadotropin secretion in European ancestry populations.Nat Commun, vol. 11, no. 1, Apr. 2020, p. 2158. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15793-w.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1439670
PMID
32345980
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nature Communications
Volume
11
Published Date
Start Page
2158
DOI
10.1038/s41467-020-15793-w

Short-term quality of life after myomectomy for uterine fibroids from the COMPARE-UF Fibroid Registry.

BACKGROUND: Uterine fibroids may decrease quality of life in a significant proportion of affected women. Myomectomy offers a uterine-sparing treatment option for patients with uterine fibroids that can be performed abdominally, laparoscopically (with or without robotic assistance), and hysteroscopically. Quality of life information using validated measures for different myomectomy routes, especially hysteroscopic myomectomy, is limited. OBJECTIVE: To compare women's perception of their short-term health-related quality of life measures and reported time to return to usual activities and return to work for different routes of myomectomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Comparing Options for Management: Patient-centered Results for Uterine Fibroids (COMPARE-UF) is a prospective nationwide fibroid registry that enrolled premenopausal women seeking treatment for uterine fibroids at 8 clinical sites. For this analysis, we included women undergoing hysteroscopic, abdominal, or laparoscopic myomectomy who completed the postprocedure questionnaire scheduled between 6 and 12 weeks after surgery. Health-related quality of life outcomes, such as pain, anxiety, and return to usual activitie, were assessed for each route. The hysteroscopic myomectomy group had large differences in demographics, fibroid number, and uterine size compared to the other groups; thus, a direct comparison of quality of life measures was performed only for abdominal and laparoscopic approaches after propensity weighting. Propensity weighting was done using 24 variables that included demographics, quality of life baseline measures, and fibroid and uterine measurements. RESULTS: A total of 1206 women from 8 COMPARE-UF sites underwent myomectomy (338 hysteroscopic, 519 laparoscopic, and 349 abdominal). All women had substantial improvement in short-term health-related quality of life and symptom severity scores, which was not different among groups. Average symptom severity scores decreased about 30 points in each group. Return to usual activities averaged 0 days (interquartile range, 0-14 days) for hysteroscopic myomectomy, 21 days (interquartile range, 14-28 days) for laparoscopic myomectomy, and 28 days (interquartile range, 14-35 days) for abdominal myomectomy. After propensity adjustment, quality of life outcomes in the laparoscopic and abdominal myomectomy groups were similar except for more anxiety in the laparoscopic myomectomy group and slightly more pain in the abdominal myomectomy group. After propensity weighting, return to usual activities favored laparoscopic compared to abdominal procedures; median time was the same at 21 days, but the highest quartile of women in the abdominal group needed an additional week of recovery (interquartile range,14.0-28.0 for laparoscopic versus 14.0-35.0 for abdominal, P < .01). Time to return to work was also longer in the abdominal arm (median, 22 days; interquartile range, 14-40 days, versus median, 42; interquartile range, 27-56). CONCLUSION: Women who underwent myomectomy had substantial improvement in health-related quality of life, regardless of route of myomectomy. After propensity weighting, abdominal myomectomy was associated with a nearly 2-week longer time to return to work than laparoscopic myomectomy.
Authors
Laughlin-Tommaso, SK; Lu, D; Thomas, L; Diamond, MP; Wallace, K; Wegienka, G; Vines, AI; Anchan, RM; Wang, T; Maxwell, GL; Jacoby, V; Marsh, EE; Spies, JB; Nicholson, WK; Stewart, EA; Myers, ER
MLA Citation
Laughlin-Tommaso, Shannon K., et al. “Short-term quality of life after myomectomy for uterine fibroids from the COMPARE-UF Fibroid Registry.Am J Obstet Gynecol, vol. 222, no. 4, Apr. 2020, pp. 345.e1-345.e22. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.ajog.2019.09.052.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1418510
PMID
31678093
Source
pubmed
Published In
American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume
222
Published Date
Start Page
345.e1
End Page
345.e22
DOI
10.1016/j.ajog.2019.09.052

Association Between Anxiety/Depression, Uterine Fibroid Symptomology and Health Status Among Women Undergoing Interventional Treatments for Uterine Fibroids.

Authors
Wallace, K; Feng, L; Thomas, L; Laughlin-Tommaso, S; Stewart, EA; Wise, L; Nicholson, WK; Anchan, RM; Maxwell, GL; Jacoby, VL; Wegienka, GR; Parry, P; Lytle, BL; Venable, S; Shiflett, A; Myers, ER; Marsh, EE
MLA Citation
Wallace, K., et al. “Association Between Anxiety/Depression, Uterine Fibroid Symptomology and Health Status Among Women Undergoing Interventional Treatments for Uterine Fibroids.Reproductive Sciences, vol. 27, no. SUPPL 1, SPRINGER HEIDELBERG, 2020, pp. 64A-64A.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1439842
Source
wos
Published In
Reproductive Sciences (Thousand Oaks, Calif.)
Volume
27
Published Date
Start Page
64A
End Page
64A

Comparative effectiveness of hysterectomy versus myomectomy on one-year health-related quality of life in women with uterine fibroids.

OBJECTIVE: To compare long-term health-related quality of life (HRQOL) 1 year after hysterectomy or myomectomy for treatment of uterine fibroids (UFs) and to determine whether route of procedure, race, or age affected improvements in HRQOL. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Eight clinical sites throughout the United States. PATIENT(S): A total of 1,113 premenopausal women with UFs who underwent hysterectomy or myomectomy as part of Comparing Options for Management: Patient-Centered Results for Uterine Fibroids. INTERVENTION(S): None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE (S): Self-reported HRQOL measures including Uterine Fibroid Symptom Quality of Life, the European QOL 5 Dimension Health Questionnaire, and the visual analog scale at baseline and 1-year after hysterectomy or myomectomy. RESULT (S): Hysterectomy patients were older with a longer history of symptomatic UF compared with myomectomy patients. There were no differences in baseline HRQOL. After adjustment for baseline differences between groups, compared with myomectomy, patients' HRQOL (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.4, 17.2) and symptom severity (95% CI, -16.3, -8.8) were significantly improved with hysterectomy. When stratified across race/ethnicity and age, hysterectomy had higher HRQOL scores compared with myomectomy. There was little difference in HRQOL (95% CI, 0.1 [-9.5, 9.6]) or symptom severity (95% CI, -3.4 [-10, 3.2]) between abdominal hysterectomy and abdominal myomectomy. CONCLUSION (S): HRQOL improved in all women 1 year after hysterectomy or myomectomy. Hysterectomy patients reported higher HRQOL summary scores compared with myomectomy patients. When stratified by route, minimally invasive hysterectomy had better HRQOL scores than minimally invasive myomectomy. There was little difference in scores with abdominal approaches.
Authors
Wallace, K; Zhang, S; Thomas, L; Stewart, EA; Nicholson, WK; Wegienka, GR; Wise, LA; Laughlin-Tommaso, SK; Diamond, MP; Marsh, EE; Jacoby, VL; Anchan, RM; Venable, S; Larry, GM; Lytle, B; Wang, T; Myers, ER
MLA Citation
Wallace, Kedra, et al. “Comparative effectiveness of hysterectomy versus myomectomy on one-year health-related quality of life in women with uterine fibroids.Fertil Steril, vol. 113, no. 3, Mar. 2020, pp. 618–26. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.fertnstert.2019.10.028.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1434766
PMID
32192594
Source
pubmed
Published In
Fertility and Sterility
Volume
113
Published Date
Start Page
618
End Page
626
DOI
10.1016/j.fertnstert.2019.10.028

Reprint of: Histological dating of timed endometrial biopsy tissue is not related to fertility status.

Authors
Coutifaris, C; Myers, ER; Guzick, DS; Diamond, MP; Carson, SA; Legro, RS; McGovern, PG; Schlaff, WD; Carr, BR; Steinkampf, MP; Silva, S; Vogel, DL; Leppert, PC; NICHD National Cooperative Reproductive Medicine Network,
MLA Citation
Coutifaris, Christos, et al. “Reprint of: Histological dating of timed endometrial biopsy tissue is not related to fertility status.Fertility and Sterility, vol. 112, no. 4 Suppl1, Oct. 2019, pp. e116–24. Epmc, doi:10.1016/j.fertnstert.2019.08.080.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1418650
PMID
31623723
Source
epmc
Published In
Fertility and Sterility
Volume
112
Published Date
Start Page
e116
End Page
e124
DOI
10.1016/j.fertnstert.2019.08.080

Research Areas:

Cervix Uteri
Cesarean Section
Clinical Trials as Topic
Cohort Studies
Comparative Effectiveness Research
Computer Simulation
Controlled Clinical Trials as Topic
Cost Savings
Cost effectiveness
Cost of Illness
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Decision Making
Decision Trees
Diagnostic Techniques, Obstetrical and Gynecological
Direct Service Costs
Evidence-Based Medicine
Fertility
Fertility Agents, Female
Genital Diseases, Female
Genital Neoplasms, Female
Gynecologic Surgical Procedures
Gynecology
Health Care Costs
Health Expenditures
Health Policy
Health Services Research
Hospital Costs
Hysterectomy
Infertility, Female
Intraoperative Complications
Leiomyoma
Markov Chains
Mass Screening
Mass Vaccination
Models, Economic
Models, Statistical
Monte Carlo Method
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Pelvic Neoplasms
Predictive Value of Tests
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome
Preventive Health Services
Prognosis
Research Design
Sensitivity and Specificity
Technology Assessment, Biomedical
Urogenital Surgical Procedures
Women's Health