Kevin Oeffinger

Overview:

Kevin Oeffinger, MD, is a family physician, Professor in the Department of Medicine, and a member of the Duke Cancer Institute (DCI). He is founding Director of the DCI Center for Onco-Primary Care, and Director of the DCI Supportive Care and Survivorship Center. He has a long-standing track record of NIH-supported research in cancer screening and survivorship and has served in a leadership capacity in various cancer-focused and primary care-focused national committees and organizations, including the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Cancer Society, and the American Academy of Family Physicians. He is currently an Associate Editor for the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

The three-fold mission of the DCI Center for Onco-Primary Care are are to: (1) deliver evidence-based, patient-centered, personalized health care across the cancer continuum by enhancing the interface between cancer specialists and primary care clinicians; (2) conduct innovative research with cutting-edge technology that can be translated to the community setting; and (3) train and educate the next generation of clinicians and researchers to extend this mission. 

Dr. Oeffinger's clinical expertise is managing survivors of pediatric and young adult cancer.

Positions:

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Professor in the Department of Community and Family Medicine

Family Medicine and Community Health
School of Medicine

Professor in Population Health Sciences

Population Health Sciences
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1984

University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio

Family Medicine Internship and Residency

Baylor College of Medicine

Family Medicine Academic Fellowship

Baylor College of Medicine

Advanced Research Training, Epidemiology And Genetics, Radiation Epidemiology

National Cancer Institute

Grants:

EMPOWER Study: Promoting BC Screening in Women Who Survived Childhood Cancer

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Improving Treatment of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Childhood Cancer Survivors

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Generic Testing to Guide Pediatric Cancer Care and Follow Up: Using Anthracycline-associated Cardiac Toxicity as a Model for the Future

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Exercise and QUality diet After Leukemia

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Sloan Kettering Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Development and Validation of Models to Predict Poor Health-Related Quality of Life Among Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer.

IMPORTANCE: Risk prediction models are important to identify survivors of childhood cancer who are at risk of experiencing poor health-related quality of life (HRQOL) as they age. OBJECTIVE: To develop and validate prediction models for a decline in HRQOL among adult survivors of childhood cancer. DESIGNS, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: This prognostic study included 4755 adults from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) diagnosed between January 5, 1970, and December 31, 1986, who completed baseline (time 0 [November 3, 1992, to August 28, 2003]) and 2 follow-up (time 1 [February 12, 2002, to May 21, 2005] and time 2 [January 6, 2014, to November 30, 2016]) surveys. Data were analyzed from June 19, 2019, to February 2, 2022. EXPOSURES: Sociodemographic, lifestyle, and emotional factors, and chronic health conditions (CHCs) were assessed at time 0 and time 1, and neurocognitive factors were assessed at time 1 to predict HRQOL at time 2 and a decline in HRQOL between time 1 and time 2. Impaired health states were defined as CHC grades 2 to 4 using the modified Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.03, and mental and neurocognitive status as 1 SD or more below reference levels. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Health-related quality of life was operationalized using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey Physical (PCS) and Mental (MCS) Component Summary and classified by optimal (≥40) or suboptimal (<40) at each point (main outcome). A decline in HRQOL was defined as a change from optimal to suboptimal between time 1 and time 2. Multivariable logistic regression identified factors associated with HRQOL decline. The cohort was randomly split into training (80%) and test (20%) data sets for model development and validation; the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was used to evaluate prediction performance. RESULTS: A total of 4755 adults (mean [SD] age at time 0, 24.3 [7.6] years; 2623 [55.2%] women) were included in the analysis. Between time 1 and time 2, 285 of 3294 survivors (8.7%) had declining PCS and 278 of 3294 (8.4%) had declining MCS. Risk factors associated with PCS decline included female sex (odds ratio [OR], 1.67 [95% CI, 1.25-2.24]), family income less than $20 000 vs $80 000 or more (OR, 2.00 [95% CI, 1.21-3.30]), presence of CHCs (OR for neurological, 2.16 [95% CI, 1.51-3.10]; OR for endocrine, 2.25 [95% CI, 1.44-3.52]; OR for gastrointestinal tract, 1.89 [95% CI, 1.32-2.69]; OR for respiratory, 1.66 [95% CI, 1.06-2.59]; OR for cardiovascular, 1.53 [95% CI, 1.14-2.06]), and depression (OR, 1.79 [95% CI, 1.20-2.67]). Risk factors associated with MCS decline included unemployment vs full-time employment (OR, 1.68; [95% CI, 1.19-2.38]), current vs never cigarette smoking (OR, 2.03 [95% CI, 1.37-3.00]), depression (OR, 4.29 [95% CI, 2.44-7.55]), somatization (OR, 1.63 [95% CI, 1.05-2.53]), impaired task efficiency (OR, 1.90 [95% CI, 1.34-2.68]), and impaired organization (OR, 1.67 [95% CI, 1.12-2.48]). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the test models were 0.74 (95% CI, 0.67-0.81) for declining PCS and 0.68 (95% CI, 0.60-0.75) for declining MCS. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: In this prognostic study of adult survivors of childhood cancer who experienced declining HRQOL, CHCs were associated with a decline in physical HRQOL, whereas current smoking and emotional and neurocognitive impairment were associated with a decline in mental HRQOL. These findings suggest that interventions targeting modifiable risk factors are needed to prevent poor HRQOL in this population.
Authors
Schulte, F; Chen, Y; Yasui, Y; Ruiz, ME; Leisenring, W; Gibson, TM; Nathan, PC; Oeffinger, KC; Hudson, MM; Armstrong, GT; Robison, LL; Krull, KR; Huang, I-C
MLA Citation
Schulte, Fiona, et al. “Development and Validation of Models to Predict Poor Health-Related Quality of Life Among Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer.Jama Netw Open, vol. 5, no. 8, Aug. 2022, p. e2227225. Pubmed, doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.27225.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1533458
PMID
35976647
Source
pubmed
Published In
Jama Network Open
Volume
5
Published Date
Start Page
e2227225
DOI
10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.27225

Long-term Cardiopulmonary Consequences of Treatment-Induced Cardiotoxicity in Survivors of ERBB2-Positive Breast Cancer.

IMPORTANCE: Trastuzumab improves outcomes in patients with ERBB2-positive (formerly HER2) breast cancer but is associated with treatment-induced cardiotoxicity, most commonly manifest by an asymptomatic decline in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Little is known to date regarding the long-term effects of treatment-induced cardiotoxicity on cardiopulmonary function in patients who survive trastuzumab-treated breast cancer. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether treatment-induced cardiotoxicity recovers or is associated with long-term cardiopulmonary dysfunction in survivors of ERBB2-positive breast cancer. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: This cross-sectional case-control study enrolled patients with nonmetastatic ERBB2-positive breast cancer after completion of trastuzumab-based therapy (median, 7.0 [interquartile range (IQR), 6.2-8.7] years after therapy) who met 1 of 2 criteria: (1) cardiotoxicity (TOX group) developed during trastuzumab treatment (ie, asymptomatic decrease of LVEF≥10% from baseline to <55% [n = 22]) or (2) no evidence of cardiotoxicity during trastuzumab treatment (NOTOX group [n = 20]). Patients were treated at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Fifteen healthy control participants (HC group) were also enrolled for comparison purposes. All groups were frequency matched by age strata (<55, 55-64, and ≥65 years). Data were collected from September 9, 2016, to August 10, 2018, and analyzed from November 20, 2018, to August 12, 2019. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Speckle-tracking echocardiography and maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing were performed to measure indices of left ventricular function (including LVEF and global longitudinal strain [GLS]) and peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2). RESULTS: A total of 57 participants (median age, 60.8 [IQR, 52.7-65.7] years) were included in the analysis. Overall, 38 of 42 patients with breast cancer (90%) were treated with anthracyclines before trastuzumab. Resting mean (SD) LVEF was significantly lower in the TOX group (56.9% [5.2%]) compared with the NOTOX (62.4% [4.0%]) and HC (65.3% [2.9%]) groups; similar results were found for GLS (TOX group, -17.8% [2.2%]; NOTOX group, -19.8% [2.2%]; HC group, -21.3% [1.8%]) (P < .001). Mean peak VO2 in the TOX group (22.9 [4.4] mL/kg/min) was 15% lower compared with the NOTOX group (27.0 [5.3] mL/kg/min; P = .03) and 25% lower compared with the HC group (30.5 [3.4] mL/ kg/min; P < .001). In patients with breast cancer, GLS was significantly associated with peak VO2 (β coefficient, -0.75; 95% CI, -1.32 to -0.18). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Treatment-induced cardiotoxicity appears to be associated with long-term marked impairment of cardiopulmonary function and may contribute to increased risk of late-occurring cardiovascular disease in survivors of ERBB2-positive breast cancer.
Authors
Yu, AF; Flynn, JR; Moskowitz, CS; Scott, JM; Oeffinger, KC; Dang, CT; Liu, JE; Jones, LW; Steingart, RM
MLA Citation
Yu, Anthony F., et al. “Long-term Cardiopulmonary Consequences of Treatment-Induced Cardiotoxicity in Survivors of ERBB2-Positive Breast Cancer.Jama Cardiol, vol. 5, no. 3, Mar. 2020, pp. 309–17. Pubmed, doi:10.1001/jamacardio.2019.5586.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1431640
PMID
31939997
Source
pubmed
Published In
Jama Cardiol
Volume
5
Published Date
Start Page
309
End Page
317
DOI
10.1001/jamacardio.2019.5586

Communicating cardiovascular risk to high-risk cancer survivors: a mixed-methods pilot study of a statin risk communication tool.

PURPOSE: Childhood, adolescent, and young adult cancer survivors treated with radiation therapy (RT) may be unaware of their high cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk or how to mitigate it. Tools are needed to improve understanding. We developed and pilot-tested a risk communication tool for shared decision-making with survivors regarding CVD risk reduction with statin therapy. We included quantitative and qualitative arms to further tool development and testing. METHODS: The statin risk communication tool was adapted from a previously validated tool. Patients were at increased risk for CVD due to history of chest RT and recruited to usual care and intervention arms. The post-visit survey included Likert-like scales to explore acceptability of the tool, knowledge questions, and a decisional conflict scale. This pilot study used descriptive statistics and was not powered for significance. Semi-structured interviews with intervention arm participants explored shared decision-making processes. RESULTS: Median participant (n = 46) age was 45. Most intervention patients (22/24, 92%) and 50% (11/22) of controls found statin information acceptable while 31% (7/22) of the control arm selected "not applicable" regarding information acceptability. Most participants were unaware of their personal CVD risk or potential statin side effects. In semi-structured interviews, participants found the tool is helpful to visualize risk and aid conversations. CONCLUSIONS: The risk communication tool was acceptable. Qualitative data suggested the tool improved decisional clarity and comfort. IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: Poor knowledge of CVD and statins and poor recall of CVD risk conversation suggest a need to continue to optimize conversations regarding cardiovascular risk and statin therapy.
Authors
Raghunathan, NJ; Zabor, EC; Anderson, N; Oeffinger, K; Tonorezos, ES; Korenstein, D
MLA Citation
Raghunathan, Nirupa J., et al. “Communicating cardiovascular risk to high-risk cancer survivors: a mixed-methods pilot study of a statin risk communication tool.J Cancer Surviv, vol. 14, no. 4, Aug. 2020, pp. 417–23. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s11764-020-00860-4.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1431164
PMID
32043205
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Cancer Surviv
Volume
14
Published Date
Start Page
417
End Page
423
DOI
10.1007/s11764-020-00860-4

Comparison of Radiation Dose Reconstruction Methods to Investigate Late Adverse Effects of Radiotherapy for Childhood Cancer: A Report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

Quantification of radiation dose to normal tissue during radiotherapy is critical for assessing risk for radiotherapy-related late effects, including subsequent neoplasms (SNs). Case-control studies of SNs typically reconstruct absorbed radiation dose to the specific SN location using individual treatment parameters. A simplified method estimates the maximum prescribed target dose to the body region in which the SN arises. We compared doses and risk estimates from these methods using data from case-control studies of subsequent brain tumors (64 cases, 244 controls) and breast cancer (94 cases, 358 controls) nested within the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (≥5-year survivors of childhood cancer diagnosed 1970-1986). The weighted kappa statistic [95% confidence interval (CI)] evaluating agreement between categorical (>0-9.9/10-19.9/20-29.9/≥30 Gy) body-region and tumor location-specific doses was 0.95 (0.91-0.98) for brain and 0.76 (0.69-0.82) for breast. The body-region and location-specific doses were assigned to the same dose category for a smaller proportion of patients treated with fields delivering a heterogeneous dose across the tissue of interest (e.g., partial brain field = 57.1%; mantle field = 61.3%) than patients treated with fields delivering a more homogeneous dose (e.g., whole brain field = 100%). Excess odds ratios per Gy (95% CI) from conditional logistic regression were 1.25 (0.33-6.33) and 1.20 (0.31-6.14) for brain tumors and 0.21 (0.05-0.77) and 0.10 (0.02-0.44) for breast cancer, using location-specific and body-region doses, respectively. We observed that body-region doses can approximate location-specific doses when the tissue of interest is clearly in the radiation field or outside the treated body region. Agreement is lower when there is greater ambiguity of SN location relative to the treatment field.
Authors
Schonfeld, SJ; Howell, RM; Smith, SA; Neglia, JP; Turcotte, LM; Arnold, MA; Inskip, PD; Oeffinger, KC; Moskowitz, CS; Henderson, TO; Leisenring, WM; Gibson, TM; Berrington de González, A; Sampson, JN; Chanock, SJ; Tucker, MA; Bhatia, S; Robison, LL; Armstrong, GT; Morton, LM
MLA Citation
Schonfeld, Sara J., et al. “Comparison of Radiation Dose Reconstruction Methods to Investigate Late Adverse Effects of Radiotherapy for Childhood Cancer: A Report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.Radiat Res, vol. 193, no. 2, Feb. 2020, pp. 95–106. Pubmed, doi:10.1667/RR15308.1.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1432516
PMID
31794291
Source
pubmed
Published In
Radiat Res
Volume
193
Published Date
Start Page
95
End Page
106
DOI
10.1667/RR15308.1

Concurrent prescribing of opioids with other sedating medications after cancer diagnosis: a population-level analysis.

PURPOSE: Cancer is a major reason for concurrent prescription of opioids with other sedating medications-particularly benzodiazepines and gabapentinoids-yet population-based assessments of the extent and predictors of concurrent prescribing among clinically and demographically diverse patients with cancer are lacking. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients with non-metastatic cancer using North Carolina cancer registry data linked with Medicare and private insurance claims (2013-2016). We used modified Poisson regression to assess associations of patient characteristic with adjusted relative risk (aRR) of new concurrent prescribing of opioids with benzodiazepines or gabapentinoids after diagnosis. RESULTS: Overall, 15% of patients were concurrently prescribed opioids with benzodiazepines or gabapentinoids. Characteristics independently associated with an increased risk of concurrent prescribing included cancer type (e.g., aRR cervical vs. colorectal cancer: 1.55, 95% CI: 1.12-2.14); prior use of opioids (aRR: 2.43, 95% CI:2.21-2.67), benzodiazepines (aRR: 4.08, 95% CI: 3.72-4.48), or gabapentinoids (3.82, 95% CI: 3.31-4.39), and premorbid mental health conditions, including substance use disorder (aRR: 1.27, 95% CI: 1.05-1.54). Black and Hispanic patients were less likely to experience concurrent prescribing (aRR, Black vs. White: 0.35, 95% CI: 0.15-0.83; aRR, Hispanic vs. White: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.66-0.85). CONCLUSION: Approximately 1 in 7 patients with cancer was concurrently prescribed opioids with other sedating medications. Associations between patient characteristics and risk of concurrent prescribing highlight predictors of concurrent prescribing and suggest a rationale for systematic assessment of substance use history at diagnosis. Future research could explore inequitable pain and symptom management and investigate risk of adverse medication-related events.
Authors
Check, DK; Baggett, CD; Kim, K; Merlin, JS; Oeffinger, KC; Winn, AN; Roberts, MC; Robinson, T; Dinan, MA
MLA Citation
Check, Devon K., et al. “Concurrent prescribing of opioids with other sedating medications after cancer diagnosis: a population-level analysis.Support Care Cancer, vol. 30, no. 12, Dec. 2022, pp. 9781–91. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s00520-022-07439-y.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1556955
PMID
36396793
Source
pubmed
Published In
Support Care Cancer
Volume
30
Published Date
Start Page
9781
End Page
9791
DOI
10.1007/s00520-022-07439-y