Kevin Oeffinger

Overview:

Kevin Oeffinger, MD, is a family physician, Professor in the Department of Medicine, and a member of the Duke Cancer Institute (DCI). He is founding Director of the DCI Center for Onco-Primary Care, and Director of the DCI Supportive Care and Survivorship Center. He has a long-standing track record of NIH-supported research in cancer screening and survivorship and has served in a leadership capacity in various cancer-focused and primary care-focused national committees and organizations, including the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Cancer Society, and the American Academy of Family Physicians. He is currently an Associate Editor for the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

The three-fold mission of the DCI Center for Onco-Primary Care are are to: (1) deliver evidence-based, patient-centered, personalized health care across the cancer continuum by enhancing the interface between cancer specialists and primary care clinicians; (2) conduct innovative research with cutting-edge technology that can be translated to the community setting; and (3) train and educate the next generation of clinicians and researchers to extend this mission. 

Dr. Oeffinger's clinical expertise is managing survivors of pediatric and young adult cancer.

Positions:

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Professor in the Department of Community and Family Medicine

Family Medicine and Community Health
School of Medicine

Professor in Population Health Sciences

Population Health Sciences
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1984

University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio

Family Medicine Internship and Residency

Baylor College of Medicine

Family Medicine Academic Fellowship

Baylor College of Medicine

Advanced Research Training, Epidemiology And Genetics, Radiation Epidemiology

National Cancer Institute

Grants:

EMPOWER Study: Promoting BC Screening in Women Who Survived Childhood Cancer

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Improving Treatment of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Childhood Cancer Survivors

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Generic Testing to Guide Pediatric Cancer Care and Follow Up: Using Anthracycline-associated Cardiac Toxicity as a Model for the Future

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Exercise and QUality diet After Leukemia

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Sloan Kettering Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Implementing a mHealth intervention to increase colorectal cancer screening among high-risk cancer survivors treated with radiotherapy in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS).

BACKGROUND: Cancer survivors treated with any dose of radiation to the abdomen, pelvis, spine, or total body irradiation (TBI) are at increased risk for developing colorectal cancer (CRC) compared to the general population. Since earlier detection of CRC is strongly associated with improved survival, the Children's Oncology Group (COG) Long-Term Follow-Up Guidelines recommend that these high-risk cancer survivors begin CRC screening via a colonoscopy or a multitarget stool DNA test at the age of 30 years or 5 years following the radiation treatment (whichever occurs last). However, only 37% (95% CI 34.1-39.9%) of high-risk survivors adhere to CRC surveillance. The Activating cancer Survivors and their Primary care providers (PCP) to Increase colorectal cancer Screening (ASPIRES) study is designed to assess the efficacy of an intervention to increase the rate of CRC screening among high-risk cancer survivors through interactive, educational text-messages and resources provided to participants, and CRC screening resources provided to their PCPs. METHODS: ASPIRES is a three-arm, hybrid type II effectiveness and implementation study designed to simultaneously evaluate the efficacy of an intervention and assess the implementation process among participants in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS), a North American longitudinal cohort of childhood cancer survivors. The Control (C) arm participants receive electronic resources, participants in Treatment arm 1 receive electronic resources as well as interactive text messages, and participants in Treatment arm 2 receive electronic educational resources, interactive text messages, and their PCP's receive faxed materials. We describe our plan to collect quantitative (questionnaires, medical records, study logs, CCSS data) and qualitative (semi-structured interviews) intervention outcome data as well as quantitative (questionnaires) and qualitative (interviews) data on the implementation process. DISCUSSION: There is a critical need to increase the rate of CRC screening among high-risk cancer survivors. This hybrid effectiveness-implementation study will evaluate the effectiveness and implementation of an mHealth intervention consisting of interactive text-messages, electronic tools, and primary care provider resources. Findings from this research will advance CRC prevention efforts by enhancing understanding of the effectiveness of an mHealth intervention and highlighting factors that determine the successful implementation of this intervention within the high-risk cancer survivor population. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This protocol was registered at clinicaltrials.gov (identifier NCT05084833 ) on October 20, 2021.
Authors
Henderson, TO; Bardwell, JK; Moskowitz, CS; McDonald, A; Vukadinovich, C; Lam, H; Curry, M; Oeffinger, KC; Ford, JS; Elkin, EB; Nathan, PC; Armstrong, GT; Kim, K
MLA Citation
Henderson, Tara O., et al. “Implementing a mHealth intervention to increase colorectal cancer screening among high-risk cancer survivors treated with radiotherapy in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS).Bmc Health Serv Res, vol. 22, no. 1, May 2022, p. 691. Pubmed, doi:10.1186/s12913-022-08082-3.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1527029
PMID
35606736
Source
pubmed
Published In
Bmc Health Services Research
Volume
22
Published Date
Start Page
691
DOI
10.1186/s12913-022-08082-3

Modifiable risk factors for neurocognitive and psychosocial problems after Hodgkin lymphoma.

Long-term survivors of childhood Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) experience a high burden of chronic health morbidities. Correlates of neurocognitive and psychosocial morbidity have not been well established. A total of 1760 survivors of HL (mean ± SD age, 37.5 ± 6.0 years; time since diagnosis, 23.6 ± 4.7 years; 52.1% female) and 3180 siblings (mean age, 33.2 ± 8.5 years; 54.5% female) completed cross-sectional surveys assessing neurocognitive function, emotional distress, quality of life, social attainment, smoking, and physical activity. Treatment exposures were abstracted from medical records. Chronic health conditions were graded according to the National Cancer Institute's Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.3 (1 = mild, 2 = moderate, 3 = severe/disabling, and 4 = life-threatening). Multivariable analyses, adjusted for age, sex, and race, estimated relative risk (RR) of impairment in survivors vs siblings and, among survivors, risk of impairment associated with demographic, clinical, treatment, and grade 2 or higher chronic health conditions. Compared with siblings, survivors had significantly higher risk (all, P < .05) of neurocognitive impairment (eg, memory, 8.1% vs 5.7%), anxiety (7.0% vs 5.4%), depression (9.1% vs 7%), unemployment (9.6% vs 4.4%), and impaired physical/mental quality of life (eg, physical function, 11.2% vs 3.0%). Smoking was associated with a higher risk of impairment in task efficiency (RR, 1.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-2.39), emotional regulation (RR, 1.84; 95% CI, 1.35-2.49), anxiety (RR, 2.43; 95% CI, 1.51-3.93), and depression (RR, 2.73; 95% CI, 1.85-4.04). Meeting the exercise guidelines of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was associated with a lower risk of impairment in task efficiency (RR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.52-0.95), organization (RR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.45-0.80), depression (RR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.48-0.92), and multiple quality of life domains. Cardiovascular and neurologic conditions were associated with impairment in nearly all domains. Survivors of HL are at elevated risk for neurocognitive and psychosocial impairment, and risk is associated with modifiable factors that provide targets for interventions to improve long-term functional outcomes.
Authors
Williams, AM; Mirzaei Salehabadi, S; Xing, M; Phillips, NS; Ehrhardt, MJ; Howell, R; Yasui, Y; Oeffinger, KC; Gibson, T; Chow, EJ; Leisenring, W; Srivastava, D; Hudson, MM; Robison, LL; Armstrong, GT; Krull, KR
MLA Citation
Williams, AnnaLynn M., et al. “Modifiable risk factors for neurocognitive and psychosocial problems after Hodgkin lymphoma.Blood, vol. 139, no. 20, May 2022, pp. 3073–86. Pubmed, doi:10.1182/blood.2021013167.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1502928
PMID
34861035
Source
pubmed
Published In
Blood
Volume
139
Published Date
Start Page
3073
End Page
3086
DOI
10.1182/blood.2021013167

Predicting adverse health outcomes in long-term survivors of a childhood cancer

More than 80% of children and young adults diagnosed with invasive cancer will survive five or more years beyond their cancer diagnosis. This population has an increased risk for serious illness-and treatment-related morbidity and premature mortality. A number of these adverse health outcomes, such as cardiovascular disease and some second primary neoplasms, either have modifiable risk factors or can be successfully treated if detected early. Absolute risk models that project a personalized risk of developing a health outcome can be useful in patient counseling, in designing intervention studies, in forming prevention strategies, and in deciding upon surveillance programs. Here, we review existing absolute risk prediction models that are directly applicable to survivors of a childhood cancer, discuss the concepts and interpretation of absolute risk models, and examine ways in which these models can be used applied in clinical practice and public health.
Authors
Moskowitz, CS; Oeffinger, KC
MLA Citation
Moskowitz, C. S., and K. C. Oeffinger. “Predicting adverse health outcomes in long-term survivors of a childhood cancer.” Children, vol. 1, no. 2, Sept. 2014, pp. 63–73. Scopus, doi:10.3390/children1020063.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1503444
Source
scopus
Published In
Children (Basel, Switzerland)
Volume
1
Published Date
Start Page
63
End Page
73
DOI
10.3390/children1020063

Adherence to cardiovascular disease risk factor medications among patients with cancer: a systematic review.

PURPOSE: The most common cause of mortality for many cancer survivors is cardiovascular disease (CVD). This requires a shift in thinking where control of CVD risk factor-related comorbidity is paramount. Our objective was to provide an understanding of adherence to medications for the management of CVD risk factor-related comorbidities among cancer survivors. METHODS: We systematically searched for articles indexed in MEDLINE (via PubMed), Embase, Cochrane (Wiley), PsycINFO, and Scopus (via Elsevier) for articles published from inception to October 31, 2019, and updated the search on June 7, 2021. English language, original research that assessed medication adherence to common CVD risk factor-related comorbidities among cancer survivors was included. We assessed risk of bias using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. RESULTS: Of the 21 studies included, 57% focused on multiple cancer types. Seventy-one percent used pharmacy-based adherence measures. Two were prospective. Adherence was variable across cancer types and CVD risk factor-related comorbidities. Among the studies that examined changes in comorbid medication adherence, most noted a decline in adherence following cancer diagnosis and throughout cancer treatment. There was a focus on breast cancer populations. CONCLUSIONS: CVD risk factor-related medication adherence is low among cancer survivors and declines over time. Given the risk for CVD-mortality among cancer survivors, testing of interventions aimed at improving adherence to non-cancer medications is critically needed. IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: For many cancer survivors, regularly taking medications to manage CVD risk is important for longevity. Engaging with primary care throughout the cancer care trajectory may be important to support cardiovascular health.
Authors
Zullig, LL; Drake, C; Shahsahebi, M; Avecilla, RAV; Whitney, C; Mills, C; Oeffinger, KC
MLA Citation
Zullig, Leah L., et al. “Adherence to cardiovascular disease risk factor medications among patients with cancer: a systematic review.J Cancer Surviv, May 2022. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s11764-022-01212-0.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1521588
PMID
35578150
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Cancer Surviv
Published Date
DOI
10.1007/s11764-022-01212-0

Long-term care for people treated for cancer during childhood and adolescence.

Worldwide advances in treatment and supportive care for children and adolescents with cancer have resulted in a increasing population of survivors growing into adulthood. Yet, this population is at very high risk of late occurring health problems, including significant morbidity and early mortality. Unique barriers to high-quality care for this group include knowledge gaps among both providers and survivors as well as fragmented health-care delivery during the transition from paediatric to adult care settings. Survivors of childhood and adolescent cancer are at risk for a range of late-occuring side-effects from treatment, including cardiac, endocrine, pulmonary, fertility, renal, psychological, cognitive, and socio-developmental impairments. Care coordination and transition to adult care are substantial challenges, but can be empowering for survivors and improve outcomes, and could be facilitated by clear, effective communication and support for self-management. Resources for adult clinical care teams and primary care providers include late-effects surveillance guidelines and web-based support services.
Authors
Tonorezos, ES; Cohn, RJ; Glaser, AW; Lewin, J; Poon, E; Wakefield, CE; Oeffinger, KC
MLA Citation
Tonorezos, Emily S., et al. “Long-term care for people treated for cancer during childhood and adolescence.Lancet, vol. 399, no. 10334, Apr. 2022, pp. 1561–72. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(22)00460-3.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1519654
PMID
35430023
Source
pubmed
Published In
Lancet
Volume
399
Published Date
Start Page
1561
End Page
1572
DOI
10.1016/S0140-6736(22)00460-3