Kevin Oeffinger

Overview:

Kevin Oeffinger, MD, is a family physician, Professor in the Department of Medicine, and a member of the Duke Cancer Institute (DCI). He is founding Director of the DCI Center for Onco-Primary Care, and Director of the DCI Supportive Care and Survivorship Center. He has a long-standing track record of NIH-supported research in cancer screening and survivorship and has served in a leadership capacity in various cancer-focused and primary care-focused national committees and organizations, including the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Cancer Society, and the American Academy of Family Physicians. He is currently an Associate Editor for the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

The three-fold mission of the DCI Center for Onco-Primary Care are are to: (1) deliver evidence-based, patient-centered, personalized health care across the cancer continuum by enhancing the interface between cancer specialists and primary care clinicians; (2) conduct innovative research with cutting-edge technology that can be translated to the community setting; and (3) train and educate the next generation of clinicians and researchers to extend this mission. 

Dr. Oeffinger's clinical expertise is managing survivors of pediatric and young adult cancer.

Positions:

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Professor in the Department of Community and Family Medicine

Family Medicine and Community Health
School of Medicine

Professor in Population Health Sciences

Population Health Sciences
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1984

University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio

Family Medicine Internship and Residency

Baylor College of Medicine

Family Medicine Academic Fellowship

Baylor College of Medicine

Advanced Research Training, Epidemiology And Genetics, Radiation Epidemiology

National Cancer Institute

Grants:

EMPOWER Study: Promoting BC Screening in Women Who Survived Childhood Cancer

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Improving Treatment of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Childhood Cancer Survivors

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Generic Testing to Guide Pediatric Cancer Care and Follow Up: Using Anthracycline-associated Cardiac Toxicity as a Model for the Future

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Exercise and QUality diet After Leukemia

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Sloan Kettering Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Clinical and genetic risk factors for radiation-associated ototoxicity: A report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study and the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort.

BACKGROUND: Cranial radiation therapy (CRT) is associated with ototoxicity, which manifests as hearing loss and tinnitus. The authors sought to identify clinical determinants and genetic risk factors for ototoxicity among adult survivors of pediatric cancer treated with CRT. METHODS: Logistic regression evaluated associations of tinnitus (n = 1991) and hearing loss (n = 2198) with nongenetic risk factors and comorbidities among CRT-treated survivors in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of CRT-related tinnitus and hearing loss were also performed. RESULTS: Males were more likely to report CRT-related tinnitus (9.4% vs 5.4%; P = 5.1 × 10-4 ) and hearing loss (14.0% vs 10.7%; P = .02) than females. Survivors with tinnitus or hearing loss were more likely to experience persistent dizziness or vertigo (tinnitus: P < 2 × 10-16 ; hearing loss: P = 6.4 × 10-9 ), take antidepressants (tinnitus: P = .02; hearing loss: P = .01), and report poorer overall health (tinnitus: P = 1.5 × 10-6 ; hearing loss: P = 1.7 × 10-6 ) in comparison with controls. GWAS of CRT-related tinnitus revealed a genome-wide significant signal in chromosome 1 led by rs203248 (P = 1.5 × 10-9 ), whereas GWAS of CRT-related hearing loss identified rs332013 (P = 5.8 × 10-7 ) in chromosome 8 and rs67522722 (P = 7.8 × 10-7 ) in chromosome 6 as nearly genome-wide significant. A replication analysis identified rs67522722, intronic to ATXN1, as being significantly associated with CRT-related hearing loss (P = .03) and de novo hearing loss (P = 3.6 × 10-4 ). CONCLUSIONS: CRT-associated ototoxicity was associated with sex, several neuro-otological symptoms, increased antidepressant use, and poorer self-reported health. GWAS of CRT-related hearing loss identified rs67522722, which was supported in an independent cohort of survivors. LAY SUMMARY: Hearing loss and subjective tinnitus (the perception of noise or ringing in the ear) are long-term side effects of cancer treatment and are common in children treated with radiation to the brain. These toxicities can affect childhood development and potentially contribute to serious learning and behavioral difficulties. This study's data indicate that males are at greater risk for hearing loss and tinnitus than females after radiation therapy to the brain. Those who develop these toxicities are more likely to use antidepressants and report poorer overall health. Health care providers can improve the management of survivors by informing patients and/or their parents of these risks.
Authors
Trendowski, MR; Baedke, JL; Sapkota, Y; Travis, LB; Zhang, X; El Charif, O; Wheeler, HE; Leisenring, WM; Robison, LL; Hudson, MM; Morton, LM; Oeffinger, KC; Howell, RM; Armstrong, GT; Bhatia, S; Dolan, ME
MLA Citation
Trendowski, Matthew R., et al. “Clinical and genetic risk factors for radiation-associated ototoxicity: A report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study and the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort.Cancer, vol. 127, no. 21, Nov. 2021, pp. 4091–102. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cncr.33775.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1489214
PMID
34286861
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Volume
127
Published Date
Start Page
4091
End Page
4102
DOI
10.1002/cncr.33775

Development and Validation of a Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Model for Childhood Cancer Survivors Treated With Chest Radiation: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study and the Dutch Hodgkin Late Effects and LATER Cohorts.

PURPOSE: Women treated with chest radiation for childhood cancer have one of the highest risks of breast cancer. Models producing personalized breast cancer risk estimates applicable to this population do not exist. We sought to develop and validate a breast cancer risk prediction model for childhood cancer survivors treated with chest radiation incorporating treatment-related factors, family history, and reproductive factors. METHODS: Analyses were based on multinational cohorts of female 5-year survivors of cancer diagnosed younger than age 21 years and treated with chest radiation. Model derivation was based on 1,120 participants in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study diagnosed between 1970 and 1986, with median attained age 42 years (range 20-64) and 242 with breast cancer. Model validation included 1,027 participants from three cohorts, with median age 32 years (range 20-66) and 105 with breast cancer. RESULTS: The model included current age, chest radiation field, whether chest radiation was delivered within 1 year of menarche, anthracycline exposure, age at menopause, and history of a first-degree relative with breast cancer. Ten-year risk estimates ranged from 2% to 23% for 30-year-old women (area under the curve, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.50 to 0.73) and from 5% to 34% for 40-year-old women (area under the curve, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.54 to 0.84). The highest risks were among premenopausal women older than age 40 years treated with mantle field radiation within a year of menarche who had a first-degree relative with breast cancer. It showed good calibration with an expected-to-observed ratio of the number of breast cancers of 0.92 (95% CI, 0.74 to 1.16). CONCLUSION: Breast cancer risk varies among childhood cancer survivors treated with chest radiation. Accurate risk prediction may aid in refining surveillance, counseling, and preventive strategies in this population.
Authors
Moskowitz, CS; Ronckers, CM; Chou, JF; Smith, SA; Friedman, DN; Barnea, D; Kok, JL; de Vries, S; Wolden, SL; Henderson, TO; van der Pal, HJH; Kremer, LCM; Neglia, JP; Turcotte, LM; Howell, RM; Arnold, MA; Schaapveld, M; Aleman, B; Janus, C; Versluys, B; Leisenring, W; Sklar, CA; Begg, CB; Pike, MC; Armstrong, GT; Robison, LL; van Leeuwen, FE; Oeffinger, KC
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1499271
PMID
34048292
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
39
Published Date
Start Page
3012
End Page
3021
DOI
10.1200/JCO.20.02244

Material, behavioral, and psychological financial hardship among survivors of childhood cancer in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

BACKGROUND: Medical financial burden includes material, behavioral, and psychological hardship and has been underinvestigated among adult survivors of childhood cancer. METHODS: A survey from 698 survivors and 210 siblings from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study was analyzed. The intensity of financial hardship was estimated across 3 domains: 1) material, including conditions that arise from medical expenses; 2) behavioral, including coping behaviors to manage medical expenses; and 3) psychological hardship resulting from worries about medical expenses and insurance, as measured by the number of instances of each type of financial hardship (0, 1-2, and ≥3 instances). Multivariable logistic regressions were conducted to examine the clinical and sociodemographic predictors of experiencing financial hardship (0-2 vs ≥3 instances). RESULTS: The intensity of financial hardship did not significantly differ between survivors and siblings. Survivors reported more instances of material hardship than siblings (1-2 instances: 27.2% of survivors vs 22.6% of siblings; ≥3 instances: 15.9% of survivors vs 11.4% siblings; overall P = .03). In multivariable regressions, insurance was protective against all domains of financial hardship (behavioral odds ratio [OR], 0.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.06-0.22; material OR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.19-0.71; psychological OR, 0.10; 95% CI, 0.05-0.21). Survivors who were older at diagnosis, female, and with chronic health conditions generally had higher levels of hardship. Brain radiation and alkylating agents were associated with higher levels of hardship. CONCLUSIONS: Material, behavioral, and psychological financial burden among survivors of childhood cancer is common.
Authors
Fair, D; Park, ER; Nipp, RD; Rabin, J; Hyland, K; Kuhlthau, K; Perez, GK; Nathan, PC; Armstrong, GT; Oeffinger, KC; Robison, LL; Leisenring, W; Kirchhoff, AC
MLA Citation
Fair, Douglas, et al. “Material, behavioral, and psychological financial hardship among survivors of childhood cancer in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.Cancer, vol. 127, no. 17, Sept. 2021, pp. 3214–22. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cncr.33613.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1484995
PMID
34061973
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Volume
127
Published Date
Start Page
3214
End Page
3222
DOI
10.1002/cncr.33613

Subsequent malignant neoplasms in the childhood cancer survivor study: Occurrence of cancer types in which human papillomavirus is an established etiologic risk factor

Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated subsequent malignant neoplasms (SMNHPV) in childhood cancer survivors are poorly understood. Methods: The cumulative risk of SMNHPV was assessed among 24,363 Childhood Cancer Survivor Study participants. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and absolute excess risk were calculated using age-matched, sex-matched, and calendar year rates from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program. Poisson regression models identified SMNHPV risk factors, evaluating relative SIRs (rSIR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Results: In total, 46 survivors developed an SMNHPV (median age, 31 years [range, 10-56 years]; median time from primary cancer, 21 years [range, 9-35 years]). SMNHPV sites included oropharynx (N = 44), anorectum (N = 6), uterine cervix (N = 2), and vulva (N = 2). The 33-year cumulative incidence was 0.3% (95% CI, 0.2%-0.4%), and the SIR was nearly 3-fold that of the general population (SIR, 2.86; 95% CI, 2.05-4.00). Female survivors were not at increased risk of cervical or vulvar cancers compared with the general population. All survivors had an elevated risk of oropharyngeal SMNHPV (males: SIR, 4.06; 95% CI, 2.37-6.97; females: SIR, 8.44; 95% CI 4.88-14.61) and anorectal SMNHPV (males: SIR, 13.56; 95% CI, 5.09-36.13; females: SIR, 9.15; 95% CI, 2.29-36.61). Males (vs females: rSIR, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.00-3.94); head, neck, and pelvic radiotherapy doses >3000 centigray (vs none: rSIR, 2.35; 95% CI, 1.11-4.97); and cisplatin-equivalent doses >400 mg/m2 (vs none: rSIR, 4.51; 95% CI, 1.78-11.43) were associated with increased SMNHPV SIRs in multivariable analysis. Conclusions: Childhood cancer survivors are at increased risk for SMN in sites susceptible to HPV-associated malignancies. Further research examining HPV in the etiology of SMN and the promotion of HPV vaccination and surveillance guidelines for SMNHPV in cancer survivors is warranted.
Authors
Henderson, TO; Fowler, BW; Hamann, HA; Nathan, PC; Whitton, J; Leisenring, WM; Oeffinger, KC; Neglia, JP; Turcotte, LM; Arnold, MA; Conces, MR; Howell, RM; Robison, LL; Armstrong, GT; Alexander, KA
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1499911
Source
scopus
Published In
Cancer
Published Date
DOI
10.1002/cncr.33922

Late-onset kidney failure in survivors of childhood cancer: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

<h4>Background</h4>The incidence of and risk factors for late-onset kidney failure among survivors over the very long term remains understudied.<h4>Materials and methods</h4>A total of 25,530 childhood cancer survivors (median follow-up 22.3 years, interquartile range 17.4-28.8) diagnosed between 1970 and 1999, and 5045 siblings from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study were assessed for self-reported late-onset kidney failure, defined as dialysis, renal transplantation, or death attributable to kidney disease. Piecewise exponential models evaluated associations between risk factors and the rate of late-onset kidney failure.<h4>Results</h4>A total of 206 survivors and 10 siblings developed late-onset kidney failure, a 35-year cumulative incidence of 1.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4-1.9) and 0.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.1-0.4), respectively, corresponding to an adjusted rate ratio (RR) of 4.9 (95% CI = 2.6-9.2). High kidney dose from radiotherapy (≥15Gy; RR = 4.0, 95% CI = 2.1-7.4), exposure to high-dose anthracycline (≥250 mg/m<sup>2</sup>; RR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.0-2.6) or any ifosfamide chemotherapy (RR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.2-5.7), and nephrectomy (RR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.0-3.4) were independently associated with elevated risk for late-onset kidney failure among survivors. Survivors who developed hypertension, particularly in the context of prior nephrectomy (RR = 14.4, 95% CI = 7.1-29.4 hypertension with prior nephrectomy; RR = 5.9, 95% CI = 3.3-10.5 hypertension without prior nephrectomy), or diabetes (RR = 2.2, 95%CI = 1.2-4.2) were also at elevated risk for late-onset kidney failure.<h4>Conclusions</h4>Survivors of childhood cancer are at increased risk for late-onset kidney failure. Kidney dose from radiotherapy ≥15 Gy, high-dose anthracycline, any ifosfamide, and nephrectomy were associated with increased risk of late-onset kidney failure among survivors. Successful diagnosis and management of modifiable risk factors such as diabetes and hypertension may mitigate the risk for late-onset kidney failure. The association of late-onset kidney failure with anthracycline chemotherapy represents a novel finding that warrants further study.
Authors
Dieffenbach, BV; Liu, Q; Murphy, AJ; Stein, DR; Wu, N; Madenci, AL; Leisenring, WM; Kadan-Lottick, NS; Christison-Lagay, ER; Goldsby, RE; Howell, RM; Smith, SA; Oeffinger, KC; Yasui, Y; Armstrong, GT; Weldon, CB; Chow, EJ; Weil, BR
MLA Citation
Dieffenbach, Bryan V., et al. “Late-onset kidney failure in survivors of childhood cancer: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.European Journal of Cancer (Oxford, England : 1990), vol. 155, Sept. 2021, pp. 216–26. Epmc, doi:10.1016/j.ejca.2021.06.050.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1494218
PMID
34391054
Source
epmc
Published In
European Journal of Cancer
Volume
155
Published Date
Start Page
216
End Page
226
DOI
10.1016/j.ejca.2021.06.050