Elise Olsen

Overview:

Dr. Olsen is a faculty member of both the Departments of Dermatology and Medicine (Division of Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy) and a member of the Duke Cancer Institute and the Duke Clinical Research Institute.  She is Founder and Director of the Duke Dermatopharmacology Study Center and has been involved in over 165 clinical studies for dermatological and oncologic indications. The studies have included Phase 1-IV, pharmaceutical, FDA, and FTC sponsored, and investigator initiated research protocols for multiple conditions.

Dr. Olsen's specific areas of expertise include cutaneous lymphoma and hair disorders.  She is the Founder and Director of the Duke Cutaneous Lymphoma Research and Treatment Center and a member of the Duke Cancer Institute.   She accepts referrals from dermatologists, oncologists and radiation oncologists for all types of cutaneous T and B cell lymphomas.  She works closely with Duke dermatopathologists, radiation oncologists and oncologists experienced specifically in cutaneous lymphoma.  She prescribes or coordinates all potential NCCN recommended treatments for cutaneous lymphoma including topical and systemic immunomodulators and chemotherapy, phototherapy, photopheresis, and radiation including total skin electron beam radiation.  She is Founder and first President of the United States Cutaneous Lymphoma Consortium and the Chairman of the Registry Committee that has created the new national registry for all types of cutaneous lymphoma. She is the Past President and Secretary Treasurer of the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphoma and first author on the evaluation, classification, and clinical trial guidelines for the most common subtype of cutaneous lymphoma.  She is Duke’s representative to the NCCN guidelines on T cell lymphomas. 

Dr Olsen is committed to helping dermatologists and other physicians/providers to diagnosis and treat patients with all types of hair loss or hair overgrowth. She is Founder and Director of the Duke Hair Disorders Research and Treatment Center and sees patients with hair loss/overgrowth in consultation with referring doctors.  She also participates in two telemedicine programs that Duke sponsors in offering consultations on hair loss (Grand Rounds and Summus). She is particularly interested in patients of all ages with extensive or treatment resistant alopecia areata, scarring hair loss, and/or chemotherapy related hair loss.  She serves as the primary investigator and coordinator for two multicenter clinical trials on hair loss--one in African American women and the other on frontal fibrosing alopecia.  She is chairman of a 10+ member task force developing standardized methodology for the assessment of all types of hair loss, an initiative that will help to facilitate new FDA approved treatments for hair loss. She serves as a consultant on the Undiagnosed Disease Network grant for children with hair loss.

Positions:

Professor of Dermatology

Dermatology
School of Medicine

Professor in Medicine

Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Member in the Duke Clinical Research Institute

Duke Clinical Research Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1978

Baylor University

Resident, Internal Medicine

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Resident, Dermatology

Duke University

Grants:

Safety, efficacy and pharmacokinetics of CD11301 gel in early stage CTCL

Administered By
Dermatology
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

USCLC National Cutaneous Lymphoma Registry

Administered By
Dermatology
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Randomized, Double-blind, Vehicle-controlled Multicenter Study to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability and Efficacy of ATI-50002 Topical Solution Administered Twice-Daily for 6 Months in Adult Subjects

Administered By
Dermatology
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Safety and Efficacy of Naloxone Lotion for the Relief of Pruritus in Patients with Mycosis Fungoides (MF)

Administered By
Dermatology
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

USCLC/Duke CLRTC Think Tank on Clinical Trials in Primary Cutaneous Lymphoma

Administered By
Dermatology
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Ruxolitinib cream for the treatment of patients with alopecia areata: A 2-part, double-blind, randomized, vehicle-controlled phase 2 study.

BACKGROUND: There are currently no treatments for alopecia areata (AA) that are universally effective or approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Oral ruxolitinib has shown efficacy in extensive AA. Ruxolitinib cream would potentially avoid systemic adverse effects. OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy and safety of 1.5% ruxolitinib cream in patients with AA who had at least 25% hair loss by Severity of Alopecia Tool score. METHODS: This was a 2-part study. Part A was an open-label, 24-week study of 1.5% ruxolitinib cream in patients with 25% to 99% hair loss followed by a 24-week extension period. Part B was a double-blind, vehicle-controlled, 24-week study of 1.5% ruxolitinib cream in patients with 25% to 100% hair loss, followed by a crossover to ruxolitinib cream in the vehicle group for 24 weeks and additional treatment time for the ruxolitinib cream group. RESULTS: Although Part A results suggested potential efficacy of 1.5% ruxolitinib cream, there was no significant difference in hair regrowth based on 50% improvement in Severity of Alopecia Tool scores between patients receiving 1.5% ruxolitinib cream and vehicle in part B. There were no significant safety issues with 1.5% ruxolitinib cream. LIMITATIONS: Single strength of ruxolitinib cream. CONCLUSIONS: The 1.5% ruxolitinib cream did not have a significant effect in patients with AA.
Authors
Olsen, EA; Kornacki, D; Sun, K; Hordinsky, MK
MLA Citation
Olsen, Elise A., et al. “Ruxolitinib cream for the treatment of patients with alopecia areata: A 2-part, double-blind, randomized, vehicle-controlled phase 2 study..” J Am Acad Dermatol, Oct. 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jaad.2019.10.016.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1416696
PMID
31622643
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2019.10.016

Basal Cell Skin Cancer, Version 1.2016, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.

Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin is the most common cancer, with a higher incidence than all other malignancies combined. Although it is rare to metastasize, patients with multiple or frequently recurring BCC can suffer substantial comorbidity and be difficult to manage. Assessment of risk is a key element of management needed to inform treatment selection. The overall management of BCC primarily consists of surgical approaches, with radiation therapy as an alternate or adjuvant option. Many superficial therapies for BCC have been explored and continue to be developed, including topicals, cryosurgery, and photodynamic therapy. Two hedgehog pathway inhibitors were recently approved by the FDA for systemic treatment of advanced and metastatic BCC, and others are in development. The NCCN Guidelines for Basal Cell Skin Cancer, published in full herein, include recommendations for selecting among the various surgical approaches based on patient-, lesion-, and disease-specific factors, as well as guidance on when to use radiation therapy, superficial therapies, and hedgehog pathway inhibitors.
Authors
Bichakjian, CK; Olencki, T; Aasi, SZ; Alam, M; Andersen, JS; Berg, D; Bowen, GM; Cheney, RT; Daniels, GA; Glass, LF; Grekin, RC; Grossman, K; Higgins, SA; Ho, AL; Lewis, KD; Lydiatt, DD; Nehal, KS; Nghiem, P; Olsen, EA; Schmults, CD; Sekulic, A; Shaha, AR; Thorstad, WL; Tuli, M; Urist, MM; Wang, TS; Wong, SL; Zic, JA; Hoffmann, KG; Engh, A
MLA Citation
Bichakjian, Christopher K., et al. “Basal Cell Skin Cancer, Version 1.2016, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology..” J Natl Compr Canc Netw, vol. 14, no. 5, May 2016, pp. 574–97. Pubmed, doi:10.6004/jnccn.2016.0065.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1149808
PMID
27160235
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Natl Compr Canc Netw
Volume
14
Published Date
Start Page
574
End Page
597
DOI
10.6004/jnccn.2016.0065

Global photographic assessment of men aged 18 to 60 years with male pattern hair loss receiving finasteride 1 mg or placebo.

BACKGROUND: Finasteride (1 mg) has been shown to increase vertex hair growth in men aged 18 to 60 years with male pattern hair loss and to increase frontal scalp hair growth in subjects aged 18 to 41 years. OBJECTIVE: A secondary efficacy analysis was conducted to determine effects of finasteride (1 mg) on scalp hair growth in the 4 distinct scalp regions affected by male pattern hair loss. METHODS: Multicenter, double-blind studies randomized patients with vertex hair loss (men aged 18-41 and 41-60 years) to finasteride (1 mg/d) or placebo. Efficacy was evaluated by review of standardized clinical photographs (global photographic assessment) of the vertex, anterior/mid scalp regions, and frontal and temporal hairlines over 24 months relative to baseline. RESULTS: At 24 months, treatment with finasteride resulted in statistically significant (P ≤ .05) hair growth versus placebo in all scalp regions. There was also a significant decrease in hair loss in the younger men treated with finasteride in all areas, but only in the vertex and anterior/mid scalp regions in the older men. A slightly higher incidence of drug-related sexual adverse experiences was reported in the finasteride group than in the placebo group, irrespective of age. LIMITATIONS: These studies enrolled men with vertex pattern hair loss; therefore, the findings may not be extrapolated to men with predominantly anterior/mid scalp, frontal, or temporal hair loss. CONCLUSION: Based on global photographic assessment, finasteride (1 mg) is able to increase hair growth in all areas of the scalp affected by male pattern hair loss.
Authors
Olsen, EA; Whiting, DA; Savin, R; Rodgers, A; Johnson-Levonas, AO; Round, E; Rotonda, J; Kaufman, KD; Male Pattern Hair Loss Study Group,
MLA Citation
Olsen, Elise A., et al. “Global photographic assessment of men aged 18 to 60 years with male pattern hair loss receiving finasteride 1 mg or placebo..” J Am Acad Dermatol, vol. 67, no. 3, Sept. 2012, pp. 379–86. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jaad.2011.10.027.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub753659
PMID
22325459
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
67
Published Date
Start Page
379
End Page
386
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2011.10.027

A proposed EGFR inhibitor dermatologic adverse event-specific grading scale from the MASCC skin toxicity study group.

BACKGROUND: Accurate grading of dermatologic adverse events (AE) due to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors (EGFRIs) is necessary for drug toxicity determinations, interagent comparisons, and supportive care trials. The most widely used severity grading scale, the National Cancer Institute's Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (NCI-CTCAE v4.0), was not designed specifically for this class of agents and may result in underreporting and poor grading of distinctive adverse events. We believe a class-specific grading scale is needed to help standardize assessment and improve reporting of EGFRI-associated dermatologic AEs. METHODS: The Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) Skin Toxicity Study Group conducted an international multidisciplinary meeting that included 20 clinicians and researchers from academic centers and government agencies. Experts from different disciplines presented current information specific to EGFRI-induced dermatologic toxicities: grading scale development, pharmacovigilance safety reporting, health-related quality of life, patient reporting, and pharmacology. Group discussions, literature reviews, and professional expertise established the theoretical foundation for the proposed grading scale. RESULTS: A new grading system is proposed for the most common events associated with EGFRI-induced dermatologic AEs: papulopustular reaction or acneiform rash, nail changes, erythema, pruritus, xerosis, hair changes, telangiectasias, hyperpigmentation, mucositis, flushing, radiation dermatitis, hyposalivation, and taste changes. The proposed scale maintains consistency with the grading principles and language of the existing CTCAE version 4.0 and MedDRA terminology and includes relevant patient-reported health-related quality of life factors. CONCLUSIONS: A grading scale specific to EGFR inhibitor dermatologic AEs is presented for formal integration into future versions of CTCAE and for validation in clinical trial settings. The study group designed this scale to detect and report EGFRI-related toxicities with greater sensitivity, specificity, and range than the scales currently used. This scale should serve as a foundation for efforts to perform objective interdrug comparisons and assessments of supportive care treatment strategies more effectively than with current methods.
Authors
Lacouture, ME; Maitland, ML; Segaert, S; Setser, A; Baran, R; Fox, LP; Epstein, JB; Barasch, A; Einhorn, L; Wagner, L; West, DP; Rapoport, BL; Kris, MG; Basch, E; Eaby, B; Kurtin, S; Olsen, EA; Chen, A; Dancey, JE; Trotti, A
MLA Citation
Lacouture, Mario E., et al. “A proposed EGFR inhibitor dermatologic adverse event-specific grading scale from the MASCC skin toxicity study group..” Support Care Cancer, vol. 18, no. 4, Apr. 2010, pp. 509–22. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s00520-009-0744-x.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub791375
PMID
20145956
Source
pubmed
Published In
Support Care Cancer
Volume
18
Published Date
Start Page
509
End Page
522
DOI
10.1007/s00520-009-0744-x

Revisions to the staging and classification of mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome: a proposal of the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas (ISCL) and the cutaneous lymphoma task force of the European Organization of Research and Treatment of Ca

The ISCL/EORTC recommends revisions to the Mycosis Fungoides Cooperative Group classification and staging system for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). These revisions are made to incorporate advances related to tumor cell biology and diagnostic techniques as pertains to mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS) since the 1979 publication of the original guidelines, to clarify certain variables that currently impede effective interinstitution and interinvestigator communication and/or the development of standardized clinical trials in MF and SS, and to provide a platform for tracking other variables of potential prognostic significance. Moreover, given the difference in prognosis and clinical characteristics of the non-MF/non-SS subtypes of cutaneous lymphoma, this revision pertains specifically to MF and SS. The evidence supporting the revisions is discussed as well as recommendations for evaluation and staging procedures based on these revisions.
Authors
Olsen, E; Vonderheid, E; Pimpinelli, N; Willemze, R; Kim, Y; Knobler, R; Zackheim, H; Duvic, M; Estrach, T; Lamberg, S; Wood, G; Dummer, R; Ranki, A; Burg, G; Heald, P; Pittelkow, M; Bernengo, M-G; Sterry, W; Laroche, L; Trautinger, F; Whittaker, S; ISCL/EORTC,
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub791383
PMID
17540844
Source
pubmed
Published In
Blood
Volume
110
Published Date
Start Page
1713
End Page
1722
DOI
10.1182/blood-2007-03-055749

Research Areas:

Alopecia
Cutaneous B Cell Lymphoma
Cutaneous T Cell Lymphoma
Hair Loss
Hirsutism