Elise Olsen

Overview:

Dr. Olsen is a faculty member of both the Departments of Dermatology and Medicine (Division of Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy) and a member of the Duke Cancer Institute and the Duke Clinical Research Institute.  She is Founder and Director of the Duke Dermatopharmacology Study Center and has been involved in over 165 clinical studies for dermatological and oncologic indications. The studies have included Phase 1-IV, pharmaceutical, FDA, and FTC sponsored, and investigator initiated research protocols for multiple conditions.

Dr. Olsen's specific areas of expertise include cutaneous lymphoma and hair disorders.  She is the Founder and Director of the Duke Cutaneous Lymphoma Research and Treatment Center and a member of the Duke Cancer Institute.   She accepts referrals from dermatologists, oncologists and radiation oncologists for all types of cutaneous T and B cell lymphomas.  She works closely with Duke dermatopathologists, radiation oncologists and oncologists experienced specifically in cutaneous lymphoma.  She prescribes or coordinates all potential NCCN recommended treatments for cutaneous lymphoma including topical and systemic immunomodulators and chemotherapy, phototherapy, photopheresis, and radiation including total skin electron beam radiation.  She is Founder and first President of the United States Cutaneous Lymphoma Consortium and the Chairman of the Registry Committee that has created the new national registry for all types of cutaneous lymphoma. She is the Past President and Secretary Treasurer of the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphoma and first author on the evaluation, classification, and clinical trial guidelines for the most common subtype of cutaneous lymphoma.  She is Duke’s representative to the NCCN guidelines on T cell lymphomas. 

Dr Olsen is committed to helping dermatologists and other physicians/providers to diagnosis and treat patients with all types of hair loss or hair overgrowth. She is Founder and Director of the Duke Hair Disorders Research and Treatment Center and sees patients with hair loss/overgrowth in consultation with referring doctors.  She also participates in two telemedicine programs that Duke sponsors in offering consultations on hair loss (Grand Rounds and Summus). She is particularly interested in patients of all ages with extensive or treatment resistant alopecia areata, scarring hair loss, and/or chemotherapy related hair loss.  She serves as the primary investigator and coordinator for two multicenter clinical trials on hair loss--one in African American women and the other on frontal fibrosing alopecia.  She is chairman of a 10+ member task force developing standardized methodology for the assessment of all types of hair loss, an initiative that will help to facilitate new FDA approved treatments for hair loss. She serves as a consultant on the Undiagnosed Disease Network grant for children with hair loss.

Positions:

Professor of Dermatology

Dermatology
School of Medicine

Professor in Medicine

Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1978

Baylor University

Resident, Internal Medicine

University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

Resident, Dermatology

Duke University

Grants:

Safety, efficacy and pharmacokinetics of CD11301 gel in early stage CTCL

Administered By
Dermatology
Awarded By
Galderma
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

United States Cutaneous Lymphoma Consortium (USCLC) National Cutaneous Lymphoma Registry to Advance and Optimize the Care and Treatment of Patients with Cutaneous Lymphoma

Administered By
Dermatology
Awarded By
US Consortium for Cutaneous Lymphomas
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Randomized, Double-blind, Vehicle-controlled Multicenter Study to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability and Efficacy of ATI-50002 Topical Solution Administered Twice-Daily for 6 Months in Adult Subjects

Administered By
Dermatology
Awarded By
Aclaris Therapeutics Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Safety and Efficacy of Naloxone Lotion for the Relief of Pruritus in Patients with Mycosis Fungoides (MF)

Administered By
Dermatology
Awarded By
Elorac Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

USCLC/Duke CLRTC Think Tank on Clinical Trials in Primary Cutaneous Lymphoma

Administered By
Dermatology
Awarded By
Verastem Oncology
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Guidelines for clinical trials of frontal fibrosing alopecia: consensus recommendations from the International FFA Cooperative Group (IFFACG).

BACKGROUND: Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) has become one of the most common causes of cicatricial alopecia worldwide. However, there is a lack of clear aetiology and robust clinical trial evidence for the efficacy and safety of agents currently used for treatment. OBJECTIVES: To enable data to be collected worldwide on FFA using common criteria and assessment methods. METHODS: A multicentre, international group of experts in hair loss was convened by email to create consensus recommendations for clinical trials. Consensus was defined at > 90% agreement on each recommended part of these guidelines. RESULTS: Standardized diagnostic criteria, severity rating, staging, and investigator and patient assessment of scalp hair loss and other clinical features of FFA were created. CONCLUSIONS: These guidelines should allow the collection of reliable aggregate data on FFA and advance efforts in both clinical and basic research to close knowledge gaps in this condition.
Authors
Olsen, EA; Harries, M; Tosti, A; Bergfeld, W; Blume-Peytavi, U; Callender, V; Chasapi, V; Correia, O; Cotsarelis, G; Dhurat, R; Dlova, N; Doche, I; Enechukwu, N; Grimalt, R; Itami, S; Hordinsky, M; Khobzei, K; Lee, W-S; Malakar, S; Messenger, A; McMichael, A; Mirmirani, P; Ovcharenko, Y; Papanikou, S; Pinto, GM; Piraccini, BM; Pirmez, R; Reygagne, P; Roberts, J; Rudnicka, L; Saceda-Corralo, D; Shapiro, J; Silyuk, T; Sinclair, R; Soares, RO; Souissi, A; Vogt, A; Washenik, K; Zlotogorski, A; Canfield, D; Vano-Galvan, S
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1484766
PMID
34105768
Source
pubmed
Published In
Br J Dermatol
Published Date
DOI
10.1111/bjd.20567

The Alopecia Areata Consensus of Experts (ACE) study part II: Results of an international expert opinion on diagnosis and laboratory evaluation for alopecia areata.

BACKGROUND: We previously reported the Alopecia Areata Consensus of Experts study, which presented results of an international expert opinion on treatments for alopecia areata. OBJECTIVE: To report the results of the Alopecia Areata Consensus of Experts international expert opinion on diagnosis and laboratory evaluation for alopecia areata. METHODS: Fifty hair experts from 5 continents were invited to participate in a 3-round Delphi process. Consensus threshold was set at greater than or equal to 66%. RESULTS: Of 148 questions, expert consensus was achieved in 82 (55%). Round 1 consensus was achieved in 10 of 148 questions (7%). Round 2 achieved consensus in 47 of 77 questions (61%). The final face-to-face achieved consensus in 25 of 32 questions (78%). Consensus was greatest for laboratory evaluation (12 of 14 questions [86%]), followed by diagnosis (11 of 14 questions [79%]) of alopecia areata. Overall, etiopathogenesis achieved the least category consensus (31 of 68 questions [46%]). LIMITATIONS: The study had low representation from Africa, South America, and Asia. CONCLUSION: There is expert consensus on aspects of epidemiology, etiopathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, laboratory evaluation, and prognostic indicators of alopecia areata. The study also highlights areas where future clinical research could be directed to address unresolved hypotheses in alopecia areata patient care.
Authors
Meah, N; Wall, D; York, K; Bhoyrul, B; Bokhari, L; Asz-Sigall, D; Bergfeld, WF; Betz, RC; Blume-Peytavi, U; Callender, V; Chitreddy, V; Combalia, A; Cotsarelis, G; Craiglow, B; Donovan, J; Eisman, S; Farrant, P; Green, J; Grimalt, R; Harries, M; Hordinsky, M; Irvine, AD; Itami, S; Jolliffe, V; King, B; Lee, W-S; McMichael, A; Messenger, A; Mirmirani, P; Olsen, E; Orlow, SJ; Piraccini, BM; Rakowska, A; Reygagne, P; Roberts, JL; Rudnicka, L; Shapiro, J; Sharma, P; Tosti, A; Vogt, A; Wade, M; Yip, L; Zlotogorski, A; Sinclair, RD
MLA Citation
Meah, Nekma, et al. “The Alopecia Areata Consensus of Experts (ACE) study part II: Results of an international expert opinion on diagnosis and laboratory evaluation for alopecia areata.J Am Acad Dermatol, vol. 84, no. 6, June 2021, pp. 1594–601. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jaad.2020.09.028.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1460979
PMID
32926985
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
84
Published Date
Start Page
1594
End Page
1601
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2020.09.028

A Global eDelphi Exercise to Identify Core Domains and Domain Items for the Development of a Global Registry of Alopecia Areata Disease Severity and Treatment Safety (GRASS).

Importance: A recent expert consensus exercise emphasized the importance of developing a global network of patient registries for alopecia areata to redress the paucity of comparable, real-world data regarding the effectiveness and safety of existing and emerging therapies for alopecia areata. Objective: To generate core domains and domain items for a global network of alopecia areata patient registries. Evidence Review: Sixty-six participants, representing physicians, patient organizations, scientists, the pharmaceutical industry, and pharmacoeconomic experts, participated in a 3-round eDelphi process, culminating in a face-to-face meeting at the World Congress of Dermatology, Milan, Italy, June 14, 2019. Findings: Ninety-two core data items, across 25 domains, achieved consensus agreement. Twenty further noncore items were retained to facilitate data harmonization in centers that wish to record them. Broad representation across multiple stakeholder groups was sought; however, the opinion of physicians was overrepresented. Conclusions and Relevance: This study identifies the domains and domain items required to develop a global network of alopecia areata registries. These domains will facilitate a standardized approach that will enable the recording of a comprehensive, comparable data set required to oversee the introduction of new therapies and harness real-world evidence from existing therapies at a time when the alopecia areata treatment paradigm is being radically and positively disrupted. Reuse of similar, existing frameworks in atopic dermatitis, produced by the Treatment of Atopic Eczema (TREAT) Registry Taskforce, increases the potential to reuse existing resources, creates opportunities for comparison of data across dermatology subspecialty disease areas, and supports the concept of data harmonization.
Authors
Wall, D; Meah, N; York, K; Bhoyrul, B; Bokhari, L; Abraham, LS; Adams, R; Bergfeld, W; Betz, RC; Blume-Peytavi, U; Callender, V; Campbell, C; Chambers, J; Chen, G; Chitreddy, V; Cotsarelis, G; Craiglow, B; Dhurat, R; Dlova, N; Donovan, J; Duque-Estrada, B; Eisman, S; Ellison, A; Farrant, P; Barberá, JF; Gadzhigoroeva, A; Grimalt, R; Harries, M; Hordinsky, M; Irvine, AD; Jolliffe, V; Jones, L; King, B; Lee, W-S; Lortkipanidze, N; McMichael, A; Messenger, A; Mirmirani, P; Olsen, E; Orlow, SJ; Ovcharenko, Y; Piraccini, BM; Pirmez, R; Rakowska, A; Reygagne, P; Riley, M; Rudnicka, L; Saceda Corralo, D; Shapiro, J; Sharma, P; Silyuk, T; Kaiumov, S; Tobin, DJ; Tosti, A; Vañó-Galván, S; Vogt, A; Wade, M; Yip, L; Zlotogorski, A; Zhou, C; Sinclair, R
MLA Citation
Wall, Dmitri, et al. “A Global eDelphi Exercise to Identify Core Domains and Domain Items for the Development of a Global Registry of Alopecia Areata Disease Severity and Treatment Safety (GRASS).Jama Dermatol, vol. 157, no. 4, Apr. 2021, pp. 1–11. Pubmed, doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2020.5839.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1475574
PMID
33656556
Source
pubmed
Published In
Jama Dermatol
Volume
157
Published Date
Start Page
1
End Page
11
DOI
10.1001/jamadermatol.2020.5839

NCCN Guidelines Insights: T-Cell Lymphomas, Version 1.2021.

Hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma (HSTCL) is a rare subtype of T-cell lymphoma associated with an aggressive clinical course and a worse prognosis. HSTCL develops in the setting of chronic immune suppression or immune dysregulation in up to 20% of cases and is most often characterized by spleen, liver, and bone marrow involvement. Diagnosis and management of HSTCL pose significant challenges given the rarity of the disease along with the absence of lymphadenopathy and poor outcome with conventional chemotherapy regimens. These Guidelines Insights focus on the diagnosis and treatment of HSTCL as outlined in the NCCN Guidelines for T-Cell Lymphomas.
Authors
Horwitz, SM; Ansell, S; Ai, WZ; Barnes, J; Barta, SK; Clemens, MW; Dogan, A; Goodman, AM; Goyal, G; Guitart, J; Halwani, A; Haverkos, BM; Hoppe, RT; Jacobsen, E; Jagadeesh, D; Jones, A; Kim, YH; Mehta-Shah, N; Olsen, EA; Pro, B; Rajguru, SA; Rozati, S; Said, J; Shaver, A; Shustov, A; Sokol, L; Torka, P; Torres-Cabala, C; Wilcox, R; William, BM; Zain, J; Dwyer, MA; Sundar, H
MLA Citation
Horwitz, Steven M., et al. “NCCN Guidelines Insights: T-Cell Lymphomas, Version 1.2021.J Natl Compr Canc Netw, vol. 18, no. 11, Nov. 2020, pp. 1460–67. Pubmed, doi:10.6004/jnccn.2020.0053.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1464504
PMID
33152703
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Natl Compr Canc Netw
Volume
18
Published Date
Start Page
1460
End Page
1467
DOI
10.6004/jnccn.2020.0053

NCCN Guidelines Insights: Primary Cutaneous Lymphomas, Version 2.2020.

Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most common subtype of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), and Sézary syndrome (SS) is a rare erythrodermic and leukemic subtype of CTCL characterized by significant blood involvement. Although early-stage disease can be effectively treated predominantly with skin-directed therapies, systemic therapy is often necessary for the treatment of advanced-stage disease. Systemic therapy options have evolved in recent years with the approval of novel agents such as romidepsin, brentuximab vedotin, and mogamulizumab. These NCCN Guidelines Insights discuss the diagnosis and management of MF and SS (with a focus on systemic therapy).
Authors
Mehta-Shah, N; Horwitz, SM; Ansell, S; Ai, WZ; Barnes, J; Barta, SK; Clemens, MW; Dogan, A; Fisher, K; Goodman, AM; Goyal, G; Guitart, J; Halwani, A; Haverkos, BM; Hoppe, RT; Jacobsen, E; Jagadeesh, D; Lunning, MA; Mehta, A; Olsen, EA; Pro, B; Rajguru, SA; Shanbhag, S; Shaver, A; Shustov, A; Sokol, L; Torka, P; Torres-Cabala, C; Wilcox, R; William, BM; Zain, J; Dwyer, MA; Sundar, H; Kim, YH
MLA Citation
Mehta-Shah, Neha, et al. “NCCN Guidelines Insights: Primary Cutaneous Lymphomas, Version 2.2020.J Natl Compr Canc Netw, vol. 18, no. 5, May 2020, pp. 522–36. Pubmed, doi:10.6004/jnccn.2020.0022.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1441746
PMID
32380458
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Natl Compr Canc Netw
Volume
18
Published Date
Start Page
522
End Page
536
DOI
10.6004/jnccn.2020.0022

Research Areas:

Alopecia
Cutaneous B Cell Lymphoma
Cutaneous T Cell Lymphoma
Hair Loss
Hirsutism