Quinn Ostrom

Overview:

I am a cancer epidemiologist with specialized training in genetic epidemiology. The overall goal of my research program is to identify genetic factors that increase the risk of developing a brain tumor as well as those that affect prognosis after diagnosis. My research focuses on: 1) using population-level cancer registry data for surveillance and risk factor discovery; 2) discovering sources of germline genetic risk for brain tumors and 3) understanding the relationship between immune traits and brain tumor risk and survival. I approach these questions through a research program of interrelated projects and application of novel analytic techniques.

Positions:

Assistant Professor in Neurosurgery

Neurosurgery, Neuro-Oncology
School of Medicine

Assistant Professor in Population Health Sciences

Population Health Sciences
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.A. 2010

Case Western Reserve University

M.P.H. 2012

Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine

Ph.D. 2018

Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine

Post Doctoral Associate

Baylor College of Medicine

Grants:

Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States (CBTRUS) Statistical Analysis

Administered By
Neurosurgery, Neuro-Oncology
Awarded By
Central Brain Tumor Registry
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Importance of the intersection of age and sex to understand variation in incidence and survival for primary malignant gliomas.

BACKGROUND: Gliomas are the most common type of malignant brain and other CNS tumors, accounting for 80.8% of malignant primary brain and CNS tumors. They cause significant morbidity and mortality. This study investigates the intersection between age and sex to better understand variation of incidence and survival for glioma in the United States. METHODS: Incidence data from 2000-2017 were obtained from CBTRUS, which obtains data from the NPCR and SEER, and survival data from the CDC's NPCR Registries. Age-adjusted incidence rates and rate ratios (IRR) per 100,000 were generated to compare male-to-female incidence by age group. Cox proportional hazard models were performed by age group, generating hazard ratios to assess male-to-female survival differences. RESULTS: Overall, glioma incidence was higher in males. Male-to-female incidence was lowest in ages 0-9 years (IRR: 1.04, 95% CI:1.01 - 1.07, p=0.003), increasing with age, peaking at 50-59 years (IRR:1.56, 95% CI:1.53 - 1.59, p<0.001). Females had worse survival for ages 0-9 (HR:0.93, 95% CI:0.87-0.99), though male survival was worse for all other age groups, with the difference highest in those 20-29 years (HR:1.36, 95% CI:1.28-1.44). Incidence and survival differences by age and sex also varied by histological subtype of glioma. CONCLUSIONS: To better understand the variation in glioma incidence and survival, investigating the intersection of age and sex is key. The current work shows that the combined impact of these variables is dependent on glioma subtype. These results contribute to the growing understanding of sex and age differences that impact cancer incidence and survival.
Authors
Wang, G-M; Cioffi, G; Patil, N; Waite, KA; Lanese, R; Ostrom, Q; Kruchko, C; Berens, ME; Connor, JR; Lathia, JD; Rubin, JB; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS
MLA Citation
Wang, Gi-Ming, et al. “Importance of the intersection of age and sex to understand variation in incidence and survival for primary malignant gliomas.Neuro Oncol, Aug. 2021. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/neuonc/noab199.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1494591
PMID
34387331
Source
pubmed
Published In
Neuro Oncol
Published Date
DOI
10.1093/neuonc/noab199

Esthesioneuroblastoma: Descriptive Epidemiology from the Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States

Authors
Colby, S; Jones, J; Habboub, G; Witek, A; Tish, S; Volovetz, J; Das, P; Ostrom, Q; Kruchko, C; Barnholtz-Sloan, J; Kshettry, V; Recinos, P
MLA Citation
Colby, Samantha, et al. “Esthesioneuroblastoma: Descriptive Epidemiology from the Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States.” 29th Annual Meeting North American Skull Base Society, Georg Thieme Verlag KG, 2019. Crossref, doi:10.1055/s-0039-1679801.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1501472
Source
crossref
Published In
29th Annual Meeting North American Skull Base Society
Published Date
DOI
10.1055/s-0039-1679801

Epidemiology of brainstem high-grade gliomas in children and adolescents in the United States, 2000-2017.

BACKGROUND: Limited population-based data exist for the brainstem gliomas for children ages ≤19 years, which includes high-grade aggressively growing tumors such as diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG). We examined the overall incidence and survival patterns in children with brainstem high-grade glioma (HGG) by age, sex, and race and ethnicity. METHODS: We used data from Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States (CBTRUS), obtained through data use agreements with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) from 2000 to 2017, and survival data from the CDCs National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR), from 2001 to 2016 for malignant brainstem HGG for ages ≤19 years (per WHO ICD-O-3 codes). HGG was determined by established histologic and/or imaging criteria. Age-adjusted incidence rates and survival data were used to assess differences overall and by age, sex race, and ethnicity. RESULTS: The incidence of brainstem HGG was higher among the female and Non-Hispanic population. Majority (69.8%) of these tumors were diagnosed radiographically. Incidence was higher in children aged 1-9 years compared to older children. Whites had a higher incidence compared to Blacks. However, the risk of death was higher among Blacks and Other race compared to Whites. There was no difference in survival by sex. CONCLUSIONS: We report the most comprehensive incidence and survival data on these lethal brainstem HGGs. Incidence and survival among patients with brainstem HGGs differed significantly by race, ethnicity, age-groups, and grade.
Authors
Patil, N; Kelly, ME; Yeboa, DN; Buerki, RA; Cioffi, G; Balaji, S; Ostrom, QT; Kruchko, C; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS
MLA Citation
Patil, Nirav, et al. “Epidemiology of brainstem high-grade gliomas in children and adolescents in the United States, 2000-2017.Neuro Oncol, vol. 23, no. 6, June 2021, pp. 990–98. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/neuonc/noaa295.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1485881
PMID
33346835
Source
pubmed
Published In
Neuro Oncol
Volume
23
Published Date
Start Page
990
End Page
998
DOI
10.1093/neuonc/noaa295

The state of neuro-oncology during the COVID-19 pandemic: a worldwide assessment.

Background: It remains unknown how the COVID-19 pandemic has changed neuro-oncology clinical practice, training, and research efforts. Methods: We performed an international survey of practitioners, scientists, and trainees from 21 neuro-oncology organizations across 6 continents, April 24-May 17, 2020. We assessed clinical practice and research environments, institutional preparedness and support, and perceived impact on patients. Results: Of 582 respondents, 258 (45%) were US-based and 314 (55%) international. Ninety-four percent of participants reported changes in their clinical practice. Ninety-five percent of respondents converted at least some practice to telemedicine. Ten percent of practitioners felt the need to see patients in person, specifically because of billing concerns and pressure from their institutions. Sixty-seven percent of practitioners suspended enrollment for at least one clinical trial, including 62% suspending phase III trial enrollments. More than 50% believed neuro-oncology patients were at increased risk for COVID-19. Seventy-one percent of clinicians feared for their own personal safety or that of their families, specifically because of their clinical duties; 20% had inadequate personal protective equipment. While 69% reported increased stress, 44% received no psychosocial support from their institutions. Thirty-seven percent had salary reductions and 63% of researchers temporarily closed their laboratories. However, the pandemic created positive changes in perceived patient satisfaction, communication quality, and technology use to deliver care and mediate interactions with other practitioners. Conclusions: The pandemic has changed treatment schedules and limited investigational treatment options. Institutional lack of support created clinician and researcher anxiety. Communication with patients was satisfactory. We make recommendations to guide clinical and scientific infrastructure moving forward and address the personal challenges of providers and researchers.
Authors
Mrugala, MM; Ostrom, QT; Pressley, SM; Taylor, JW; Thomas, AA; Wefel, JS; Coven, SL; Acquaye, AA; Haynes, C; Agnihotri, S; Lim, M; Peters, KB; Sulman, EP; Salcido, JT; Butowski, NA; Hervey-Jumper, S; Mansouri, A; Oliver, KR; Porter, AB; Nassiri, F; Schiff, D; Dunbar, EM; Hegi, ME; Armstrong, TS; van den Bent, MJ; Chang, SM; Zadeh, G; Chheda, MG
MLA Citation
Mrugala, Maciej M., et al. “The state of neuro-oncology during the COVID-19 pandemic: a worldwide assessment.Neurooncol Adv, vol. 3, no. 1, Jan. 2021, p. vdab035. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/noajnl/vdab035.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1483189
PMID
34007966
Source
pubmed
Published In
Neuro Oncology Advances
Volume
3
Published Date
Start Page
vdab035
DOI
10.1093/noajnl/vdab035

Glioblastoma as an age-related neurological disorder in adults.

Background: Advanced age is a major risk factor for the development of many diseases including those affecting the central nervous system. Wild-type isocitrate dehydrogenase glioblastoma (IDHwt GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain cancer and accounts for ≥90% of all adult GBM diagnoses. Patients with IDHwt GBM have a median age of diagnosis at 68-70 years of age, and increasing age is associated with an increasingly worse prognosis for patients with this type of GBM. Methods: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results, The Cancer Genome Atlas, and the Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas databases were analyzed for mortality indices. Meta-analysis of 80 clinical trials was evaluated for log hazard ratio for aging to tumor survivorship. Results: Despite significant advances in the understanding of intratumoral genetic alterations, molecular characteristics of tumor microenvironments, and relationships between tumor molecular characteristics and the use of targeted therapeutics, life expectancy for older adults with GBM has yet to improve. Conclusions: Based upon the results of our analysis, we propose that age-dependent factors that are yet to be fully elucidated, contribute to IDHwt GBM patient outcomes.
Authors
Kim, M; Ladomersky, E; Mozny, A; Kocherginsky, M; O'Shea, K; Reinstein, ZZ; Zhai, L; Bell, A; Lauing, KL; Bollu, L; Rabin, E; Dixit, K; Kumthekar, P; Platanias, LC; Hou, L; Zheng, Y; Wu, J; Zhang, B; Hrachova, M; Merrill, SA; Mrugala, MM; Prabhu, VC; Horbinski, C; James, CD; Yamini, B; Ostrom, QT; Johnson, MO; Reardon, DA; Lukas, RV; Wainwright, DA
MLA Citation
Kim, Miri, et al. “Glioblastoma as an age-related neurological disorder in adults.Neurooncol Adv, vol. 3, no. 1, Jan. 2021, p. vdab125. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/noajnl/vdab125.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1499584
PMID
34647022
Source
pubmed
Published In
Neuro Oncology Advances
Volume
3
Published Date
Start Page
vdab125
DOI
10.1093/noajnl/vdab125

Research Areas:

Brain--Tumors
Cancer Disparities
Cancer--Epidemiology
Genetic epidemiology
Genome-Wide Association Study
Glioma
Health Disparities
Molecular Epidemiology
Registries
SEER Program