Gregory Palmer

Overview:

Greg Palmer obtained his B.S. in Biomedical Engineering from Marquette University in 2000, after which he obtained his Ph.D. in BME from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Biology Division at Duke University Medical Center. His primary research focus has been identifying and exploiting the changes in absorption, scattering, and fluorescence properties of tissue associated with cancer progression and therapeutic response. To this end he has implemented a model-based approach for extracting absorber and scatterer properties from diffuse reflectance and fluorescence measurements. More recently he has developed quantitative imaging methodologies for intravital microscopy to characterize tumor functional and molecular response to radiation and chemotherapy. His awards have included the Jack Fowler Award from the Radiation Research Society.

Laboratory Website:
https://radonc.duke.edu/research-education/research-labs/radiation-and-…

Positions:

Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology

Radiation Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 2005

University of Wisconsin - Madison

Grants:

Characterization of Tumor Immunobiological Factors that Promote Lymphovascular Invasion and Dissemination in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

Administered By
Surgery, Surgical Sciences
Awarded By
Department of Defense
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Janssen Research AGreement

Administered By
Radiation Oncology
Awarded By
Janssen Research & Development, LLC
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Sepsis-induced Red Cell Dysfunction (SiRD)

Administered By
Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine
Awarded By
Washington University
Role
Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Treating Hypoxia via Tumorally Directed Oxygen for Improving Radiation Therapy

Administered By
Radiation Oncology
Awarded By
University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Hand-held advanced functional imager for assessing local tissue oxygenation

Administered By
Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine
Awarded By
Wasatch Photonics, Inc.
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Targeting the TIE2 pathway with a novel small molecule vascular endothelial protein tyrosine phosphatase (VE-PTP) inhibitor in high-grade serous ovarian cancer

Authors
Cobb, LP; Rickard, A; Herbert, J; Hanna, G; Palmer, G; Siamakpour-Reihani, S; Huang, Z; Peters, K; Kontos, C; Berchuck, A; Secord, AA
MLA Citation
Cobb, L. P., et al. “Targeting the TIE2 pathway with a novel small molecule vascular endothelial protein tyrosine phosphatase (VE-PTP) inhibitor in high-grade serous ovarian cancer.” Gynecologic Oncology, vol. 149, Elsevier BV, 2018, pp. 14–14. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.ygyno.2018.04.037.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1467280
Source
crossref
Published In
Gynecologic Oncology
Volume
149
Published Date
Start Page
14
End Page
14
DOI
10.1016/j.ygyno.2018.04.037

Dual-emissive, oxygen-sensing boron nanoparticles quantify oxygen consumption rate in breast cancer cells.

SIGNIFICANCE: Decreasing the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) of tumor cells is a powerful method for ameliorating tumor hypoxia. However, quantifying the change in OCR is challenging in complex experimental systems. AIM: We present a method for quantifying the OCR of two tumor cell lines using oxygen-sensitive dual-emissive boron nanoparticles (BNPs). We hypothesize that our BNP results are equivalent to the standard Seahorse assay. APPROACH: We quantified the spectral emissions of the BNP and accounted for external oxygen diffusion to quantify OCR over 24 h. The BNP-computed OCR of two breast cancer cell lines, E0771 and 4T07, were compared with their respective Seahorse assays. Both cell lines were also irradiated to quantify radiation-induced changes in the OCR. RESULTS: Using a Bland-Altman analysis, our BNPs OCR was equivalent to the standard Seahorse assay. Moreover, in an additional experiment in which we irradiated the cells at their 50% survival fraction, the BNPs were sensitive enough to quantify 24% reduction in OCR after irradiation. CONCLUSIONS: Our results conclude that the BNPs are a viable alternative to the Seahorse assay for quantifying the OCR in cells. The Bland-Altman analysis showed that these two methods result in equivalent OCR measurements. Future studies will extend the OCR measurements to complex systems including 3D cultures and in vivo models, in which OCR measurements cannot currently be made.
Authors
Rickard, AG; Zhuang, M; DeRosa, CA; Zhang, X; Dewhirst, MW; Fraser, CL; Palmer, GM
MLA Citation
Rickard, Ashlyn G., et al. “Dual-emissive, oxygen-sensing boron nanoparticles quantify oxygen consumption rate in breast cancer cells.J Biomed Opt, vol. 25, no. 11, Nov. 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.1117/1.JBO.25.11.116504.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1465313
PMID
33231018
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Biomedical Optics
Volume
25
Published Date
DOI
10.1117/1.JBO.25.11.116504

Abstract 6630: Synergistic immuno photothermal nanotherapy (SYMPHONY) for combination cancer therapy

Authors
Liu, Y; Maccarini, P; Palmer, GM; Inman, BA; Fecci, PE; Vo-Dinh, T
MLA Citation
Liu, Yang, et al. “Abstract 6630: Synergistic immuno photothermal nanotherapy (SYMPHONY) for combination cancer therapy.” Immunology, American Association for Cancer Research, 2020. Crossref, doi:10.1158/1538-7445.am2020-6630.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1475596
Source
crossref
Published In
Immunology
Published Date
DOI
10.1158/1538-7445.am2020-6630

Cherenkov emissions for studying tumor changes during radiation therapy: An exploratory study in domesticated dogs with naturally-occurring cancer.

PURPOSE: Real-time monitoring of physiological changes of tumor tissue during radiation therapy (RT) could improve therapeutic efficacy and predict therapeutic outcomes. Cherenkov radiation is a normal byproduct of radiation deposited in tissue. Previous studies in rat tumors have confirmed a correlation between Cherenkov emission spectra and optical measurements of blood-oxygen saturation based on the tissue absorption coefficients. The purpose of this study is to determine if it is feasible to image Cherenkov emissions during radiation therapy in larger human-sized tumors of pet dogs with cancer. We also wished to validate the prior work in rats, to determine if Cherenkov emissions have the potential to act an indicator of blood-oxygen saturation or water-content changes in the tumor tissue-both of which have been correlated with patient prognosis. METHODS: A DoseOptics camera, built to image the low-intensity emission of Cherenkov radiation, was used to measure Cherenkov intensities in a cohort of cancer-bearing pet dogs during clinical irradiation. Tumor type and location varied, as did the radiation fractionation scheme and beam arrangement, each planned according to institutional standard-of-care. Unmodulated radiation was delivered using multiple 6 MV X-ray beams from a clinical linear accelerator. Each dog was treated with a minimum of 16 Gy total, in ≥3 fractions. Each fraction was split into at least three subfractions per gantry angle. During each subfraction, Cherenkov emissions were imaged. RESULTS: We documented significant intra-subfraction differences between the Cherenkov intensities for normal tissue, whole-tumor tissue, tissue at the edge of the tumor and tissue at the center of the tumor (p<0.05). Additionally, intra-subfraction changes suggest that Cherenkov emissions may have captured fluctuating absorption properties within the tumor. CONCLUSION: Here we demonstrate that it is possible to obtain Cherenkov emissions from canine cancers within a fraction of radiotherapy. The entire optical spectrum was obtained which includes the window for imaging changes in water and hemoglobin saturation. This lends credence to the goal of using this method during radiotherapy in human patients and client-owned pets.
Authors
Rickard, AG; Yoshikawa, H; Palmer, GM; Liu, HQ; Dewhirst, MW; Nolan, MW; Zhang, X
MLA Citation
Rickard, Ashlyn G., et al. “Cherenkov emissions for studying tumor changes during radiation therapy: An exploratory study in domesticated dogs with naturally-occurring cancer.Plos One, vol. 15, no. 8, 2020, p. e0238106. Pubmed, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0238106.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1457114
PMID
32845905
Source
pubmed
Published In
Plos One
Volume
15
Published Date
Start Page
e0238106
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0238106

Use of genetic algorithms to optimize fiber optic probe design for the extraction of tissue optical properties

An approach for optimizing the probe geometry for extracting optical properties is developed. It was found that optical properties could be extracted with accuracies of better than 0.5 cm , while requiring no a priori assumptions. © 2005 Optical Society of America. -1
MLA Citation
Palmer, G. M., and N. Ramanujam. “Use of genetic algorithms to optimize fiber optic probe design for the extraction of tissue optical properties.” Optics Infobase Conference Papers, 2006. Scopus, doi:10.1364/bio.2006.me45.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1454508
Source
scopus
Published In
Optics Infobase Conference Papers
Published Date
DOI
10.1364/bio.2006.me45

Research Areas:

Absorption
Adipose Tissue
Adult
Algorithms
Altitude
Anemia, Sickle Cell
Angiogenesis Inhibitors
Angiopoietins
Animals
Anoxia
Antibiotics, Antineoplastic
Arterial Pressure
Artificial Intelligence
Biological Transport
Biopsy
Blood Flow Velocity
Blood Vessels
Blood flow
Blotting, Western
Brain
Breast
Breast Neoplasms
Carcinoma in Situ
Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast
Carcinoma, Lobular
Cell Adhesion
Cell Hypoxia
Cell Line
Cell Line, Tumor
Cell Movement
Cell Tracking
Cell Transformation, Neoplastic
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia
Cheek
Chickens
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Colorectal Neoplasms
Combined Modality Therapy
Computer Simulation
Computer-Aided Design
Contrast Media
Cricetinae
Cyclic N-Oxides
Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases, Type 5
Cytotoxicity, Immunologic
Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted
Diagnostic Imaging
Disease Models, Animal
Disease-Free Survival
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Doxorubicin
Drug Delivery Systems
Drug Evaluation, Preclinical
Drug Monitoring
Drug Synergism
Electric Capacitance
Electric Conductivity
Electromagnetic Phenomena
Equipment Design
Erythrocytes
Erythrocytes, Abnormal
Exercise
Feasibility Studies
Female
Fiber Optic Technology
Fibrocystic Breast Disease
Gene Expression Regulation
Glycerol
HCT116 Cells
Head and Neck Neoplasms
Heart Rate
Heme Oxygenase-1
Hemin
Hemodynamics
Hemoglobins
Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells
Humans
Hydrogen Peroxide
Hyperthermia, Induced
Hypoxia
Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Image processing
Immunotherapy, Adoptive
Isoxazoles
Lactic Acid
Lasers
Least-Squares Analysis
Light
Lighting
Liposomes
Luminescent Proteins
Lung
Lung Neoplasms
Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental
Mesocricetus
Metoprolol
Mice
Mice, Nude
Microcirculation
Microscopy
Microscopy, Fluorescence
Microscopy, Video
Microvessels
Microwaves
Middle Aged
Misonidazole
Models, Animal
Models, Biological
Models, Chemical
Models, Statistical
Molecular Imaging
Monte Carlo Method
Mouth Mucosa
Mouth Neoplasms
Muscle, Skeletal
NADP
Nanomedicine
Nanoparticles
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Neoplasm Staging
Neoplasm Transplantation
Neoplasms
Neoplasms, Experimental
Neoplasms, Fibrous Tissue
Neovascularization, Pathologic
Nephelometry and Turbidimetry
Optical Fibers
Optical Phenomena
Optics and Photonics
Oximetry
Oxygen
Oxygen Consumption
Pattern Recognition, Automated
Phantoms, Imaging
Phenylpropionates
Photoacoustic Techniques
Photometry
Physical Conditioning, Animal
Pilot Projects
Positron-Emission Tomography
Precancerous Conditions
Predictive Value of Tests
Principal Component Analysis
Prodrugs
Prognosis
Protoporphyrins
Pulmonary Artery
Radiometry
Radiopharmaceuticals
Random Allocation
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Reactive Oxygen Species
Receptor, erbB-2
Receptors, Endothelin
Reflectance
Refractometry
Renal Circulation
Reproducibility of Results
Respiration
Scattering, Radiation
Sensitivity and Specificity
Spectrometry, Fluorescence
Spectrophotometry
Spectrophotometry, Ultraviolet
Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared
Spectrum Analysis
Theophylline
Treatment Outcome
Triazines
Tumor Markers, Biological
Tumor Microenvironment
United States
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Vasoconstriction
Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
beta Carotene