Gregory Palmer

Overview:

Greg Palmer obtained his B.S. in Biomedical Engineering from Marquette University in 2000, after which he obtained his Ph.D. in BME from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Biology Division at Duke University Medical Center. His primary research focus has been identifying and exploiting the changes in absorption, scattering, and fluorescence properties of tissue associated with cancer progression and therapeutic response. To this end he has implemented a model-based approach for extracting absorber and scatterer properties from diffuse reflectance and fluorescence measurements. More recently he has developed quantitative imaging methodologies for intravital microscopy to characterize tumor functional and molecular response to radiation and chemotherapy. His awards have included the Jack Fowler Award from the Radiation Research Society.

Laboratory Website:
https://radonc.duke.edu/research-education/research-labs/radiation-and-…

Positions:

Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology

Radiation Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 2005

University of Wisconsin at Madison

Grants:

Muscle-macrophage constructs for skeletal muscle repair

Administered By
Biomedical Engineering
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Characterization of Tumor Immunobiological Factors that Promote Lymphovascular Invasion and Dissemination in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

Administered By
Surgery, Surgical Sciences
Awarded By
Department of Defense
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Janssen Research AGreement

Administered By
Radiation Oncology
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Sepsis-induced Red Cell Dysfunction (SiRD)

Administered By
Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine
Role
Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Treating Hypoxia via Tumorally Directed Oxygen for Improving Radiation Therapy

Administered By
Radiation Oncology
Awarded By
University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Can Radiation Therapy Enhanced by Cherenkov Photo-Activation (RECA) Elicit a Long-Term Anti-Tumor Effect?

Authors
Yoon, S; Rickard, A; Adamson, J; Palmer, G; Oldham, M
MLA Citation
Yoon, S., et al. “Can Radiation Therapy Enhanced by Cherenkov Photo-Activation (RECA) Elicit a Long-Term Anti-Tumor Effect?.” Medical Physics, vol. 46, no. 6, WILEY, 2019, pp. E665–66.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1395494
Source
wos
Published In
Medical Physics
Volume
46
Published Date
Start Page
E665
End Page
E666

Comparison of Seamless Radiation and Microbeam Radiation in Immunotherapy Enhancement

Authors
Rivera, J; Laemont, K; Tovmasyan, A; Stryker, S; Palmer, G; Chang, S
MLA Citation
Rivera, J., et al. “Comparison of Seamless Radiation and Microbeam Radiation in Immunotherapy Enhancement.” Medical Physics, vol. 46, no. 6, WILEY, 2019, pp. E457–E457.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1396036
Source
wos
Published In
Medical Physics
Volume
46
Published Date
Start Page
E457
End Page
E457

Targeting Boron Nanoparticles to the Folate Receptor in Breast Cancer Cells for Hypoxia Imaging

Authors
Chan, L; Rickard, A; Zhuang, M; Fraser, C; Palmer, G
MLA Citation
Chan, L., et al. “Targeting Boron Nanoparticles to the Folate Receptor in Breast Cancer Cells for Hypoxia Imaging.” Medical Physics, vol. 46, no. 6, WILEY, 2019, pp. E154–E154.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1396476
Source
wos
Published In
Medical Physics
Volume
46
Published Date
Start Page
E154
End Page
E154

Quantifying Tumor Reoxygenation in Irradiated Murine Breast Tumors in Vivo Using Dual-Emissive Boron Nanoparticles

Authors
Chan, L; Zhang, H; DeRosa, C; Fraser, C; Palmer, G
MLA Citation
Chan, L., et al. “Quantifying Tumor Reoxygenation in Irradiated Murine Breast Tumors in Vivo Using Dual-Emissive Boron Nanoparticles.” Medical Physics, vol. 46, no. 6, WILEY, 2019, pp. E154–E154.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1396477
Source
wos
Published In
Medical Physics
Volume
46
Published Date
Start Page
E154
End Page
E154

Simultaneous in vivo optical quantification of key metabolic and vascular endpoints reveals tumor metabolic diversity in murine breast tumor models.

Therapeutically exploiting vascular and metabolic endpoints becomes critical to translational cancer studies because altered vascularity and deregulated metabolism are two important cancer hallmarks. The metabolic and vascular phenotypes of three sibling breast tumor lines with different metastatic potential are investigated in vivo with a newly developed quantitative spectroscopy system. All tumor lines have different metabolic and vascular characteristics compared to normal tissues, and there are strong positive correlations between metabolic (glucose uptake and mitochondrial membrane potential) and vascular (oxygen saturations and hemoglobin concentrations) parameters for metastatic (4T1) tumors but not for micrometastatic (4T07) and nonmetastatic (67NR) tumors. A longitudinal study shows that both vascular and metabolic endpoints of 4T1 tumors increased up to a specific tumor size threshold beyond which these parameters decreased. The synchronous changes between metabolic and vascular parameters, along with the strong positive correlations between these endpoints suggest that 4T1 tumors rely on strong oxidative phosphorylation in addition to glycolysis. This study illustrates the great potential of our optical technique to provide valuable dynamic information about the interplay between the metabolic and vascular status of tumors, with important implications for translational cancer investigations.
Authors
Zhu, C; Li, M; Vincent, T; Martin, HL; Crouch, BT; Martinez, AF; Madonna, MC; Palmer, GM; Dewhirst, MW; Ramanujam, N
MLA Citation
Zhu, Caigang, et al. “Simultaneous in vivo optical quantification of key metabolic and vascular endpoints reveals tumor metabolic diversity in murine breast tumor models..” J Biophotonics, vol. 12, no. 4, Apr. 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/jbio.201800372.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1363015
PMID
30565420
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Biophotonics
Volume
12
Published Date
Start Page
e201800372
DOI
10.1002/jbio.201800372

Research Areas:

Absorption
Adipose Tissue
Adult
Algorithms
Altitude
Anemia, Sickle Cell
Angiogenesis Inhibitors
Angiopoietins
Animals
Anoxia
Antibiotics, Antineoplastic
Arterial Pressure
Artificial Intelligence
Biological Transport
Biopsy
Blood Flow Velocity
Blood Vessels
Blood flow
Blotting, Western
Brain
Breast
Breast Neoplasms
Carcinoma in Situ
Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast
Carcinoma, Lobular
Cell Adhesion
Cell Hypoxia
Cell Line
Cell Line, Tumor
Cell Movement
Cell Tracking
Cell Transformation, Neoplastic
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia
Cheek
Chickens
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Colorectal Neoplasms
Combined Modality Therapy
Computer Simulation
Computer-Aided Design
Contrast Media
Cricetinae
Cyclic N-Oxides
Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases, Type 5
Cytotoxicity, Immunologic
Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted
Diagnostic Imaging
Disease Models, Animal
Disease-Free Survival
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Doxorubicin
Drug Delivery Systems
Drug Evaluation, Preclinical
Drug Monitoring
Drug Synergism
Electric Capacitance
Electric Conductivity
Electromagnetic Phenomena
Equipment Design
Erythrocytes
Erythrocytes, Abnormal
Exercise
Feasibility Studies
Female
Fiber Optic Technology
Fibrocystic Breast Disease
Gene Expression Regulation
Glycerol
HCT116 Cells
Head and Neck Neoplasms
Heart Rate
Heme Oxygenase-1
Hemin
Hemodynamics
Hemoglobins
Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells
Humans
Hydrogen Peroxide
Hyperthermia, Induced
Hypoxia
Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Image processing
Immunotherapy, Adoptive
Isoxazoles
Lactic Acid
Lasers
Least-Squares Analysis
Light
Lighting
Liposomes
Luminescent Proteins
Lung
Lung Neoplasms
Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental
Mesocricetus
Metoprolol
Mice
Mice, Nude
Microcirculation
Microscopy
Microscopy, Fluorescence
Microscopy, Video
Microvessels
Microwaves
Middle Aged
Misonidazole
Models, Animal
Models, Biological
Models, Chemical
Models, Statistical
Molecular Imaging
Monte Carlo Method
Mouth Mucosa
Mouth Neoplasms
Muscle, Skeletal
NADP
Nanomedicine
Nanoparticles
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Neoplasm Staging
Neoplasm Transplantation
Neoplasms
Neoplasms, Experimental
Neoplasms, Fibrous Tissue
Neovascularization, Pathologic
Nephelometry and Turbidimetry
Optical Fibers
Optical Phenomena
Optics and Photonics
Oximetry
Oxygen
Oxygen Consumption
Pattern Recognition, Automated
Phantoms, Imaging
Phenylpropionates
Photoacoustic Techniques
Photometry
Physical Conditioning, Animal
Pilot Projects
Positron-Emission Tomography
Precancerous Conditions
Predictive Value of Tests
Principal Component Analysis
Prodrugs
Prognosis
Protoporphyrins
Pulmonary Artery
Radiometry
Radiopharmaceuticals
Random Allocation
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Reactive Oxygen Species
Receptor, erbB-2
Receptors, Endothelin
Reflectance
Refractometry
Renal Circulation
Reproducibility of Results
Respiration
Scattering, Radiation
Sensitivity and Specificity
Spectrometry, Fluorescence
Spectrophotometry
Spectrophotometry, Ultraviolet
Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared
Spectrum Analysis
Theophylline
Treatment Outcome
Triazines
Tumor Markers, Biological
Tumor Microenvironment
United States
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Vasoconstriction
Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
beta Carotene