Jung Wook Park

Positions:

Rollie Assistant Professorship of Correlative Pathology

Pathology
School of Medicine

Assistant Professor Track V in Pathology

Pathology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 2013

University of Wisconsin at Madison

Grants:

Unveiling the roles of neuroendocrine cells in prostate cancer development

Administered By
Pathology
Awarded By
Mike Slive Foundation
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

A genetically defined disease model reveals that urothelial cells can initiate divergent bladder cancer phenotypes.

Small cell carcinoma of the bladder (SCCB) is a rare and lethal phenotype of bladder cancer. The pathogenesis and molecular features are unknown. Here, we established a genetically engineered SCCB model and a cohort of patient SCCB and urothelial carcinoma samples to characterize molecular similarities and differences between bladder cancer phenotypes. We demonstrate that SCCB shares a urothelial origin with other bladder cancer phenotypes by showing that urothelial cells driven by a set of defined oncogenic factors give rise to a mixture of tumor phenotypes, including small cell carcinoma, urothelial carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma. Tumor-derived single-cell clones also give rise to both SCCB and urothelial carcinoma in xenografts. Despite this shared urothelial origin, clinical SCCB samples have a distinct transcriptional profile and a unique transcriptional regulatory network. Using the transcriptional profile from our cohort, we identified cell surface proteins (CSPs) associated with the SCCB phenotype. We found that the majority of SCCB samples have PD-L1 expression in both tumor cells and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, suggesting that immune checkpoint inhibitors could be a treatment option for SCCB. We further demonstrate that our genetically engineered tumor model is a representative tool for investigating CSPs in SCCB by showing that it shares a similar a CSP profile with clinical samples and expresses SCCB-up-regulated CSPs at both the mRNA and protein levels. Our findings reveal distinct molecular features of SCCB and provide a transcriptional dataset and a preclinical model for further investigating SCCB biology.
Authors
Wang, L; Smith, BA; Balanis, NG; Tsai, BL; Nguyen, K; Cheng, MW; Obusan, MB; Esedebe, FN; Patel, SJ; Zhang, H; Clark, PM; Sisk, AE; Said, JW; Huang, J; Graeber, TG; Witte, ON; Chin, AI; Park, JW
MLA Citation
Wang, Liang, et al. “A genetically defined disease model reveals that urothelial cells can initiate divergent bladder cancer phenotypes..” Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, Dec. 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.1073/pnas.1915770117.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1424500
PMID
31871155
Source
pubmed
Published In
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
Published Date
DOI
10.1073/pnas.1915770117

Targeting cellular heterogeneity with CXCR2 blockade for the treatment of therapy-resistant prostate cancer.

Hormonal therapy targeting androgen receptor (AR) is initially effective to treat prostate cancer (PCa), but it eventually fails. It has been hypothesized that cellular heterogeneity of PCa, consisting of AR+ luminal tumor cells and AR- neuroendocrine (NE) tumor cells, may contribute to therapy failure. Here, we describe the successful purification of NE cells from primary fresh human prostate adenocarcinoma based on the cell surface receptor C-X-C motif chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2). Functional studies revealed CXCR2 to be a driver of the NE phenotype, including loss of AR expression, lineage plasticity, and resistance to hormonal therapy. CXCR2-driven NE cells were critical for the tumor microenvironment by providing a survival niche for the AR+ luminal cells. We demonstrate that the combination of CXCR2 inhibition and AR targeting is an effective treatment strategy in mouse xenograft models. Such a strategy has the potential to overcome therapy resistance caused by tumor cell heterogeneity.
Authors
Li, Y; He, Y; Butler, W; Xu, L; Chang, Y; Lei, K; Zhang, H; Zhou, Y; Gao, AC; Zhang, Q; Taylor, DG; Cheng, D; Farber-Katz, S; Karam, R; Landrith, T; Li, B; Wu, S; Hsuan, V; Yang, Q; Hu, H; Chen, X; Flowers, M; McCall, SJ; Lee, JK; Smith, BA; Park, JW; Goldstein, AS; Witte, ON; Wang, Q; Rettig, MB; Armstrong, AJ; Cheng, Q; Huang, J
MLA Citation
Li, Yanjing, et al. “Targeting cellular heterogeneity with CXCR2 blockade for the treatment of therapy-resistant prostate cancer..” Sci Transl Med, vol. 11, no. 521, Dec. 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.1126/scitranslmed.aax0428.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1423084
PMID
31801883
Source
pubmed
Published In
Sci Transl Med
Volume
11
Published Date
DOI
10.1126/scitranslmed.aax0428

High incidence of HPV-associated head and neck cancers in FA deficient mice is associated with E7's induction of DNA damage through its inactivation of pocket proteins.

Fanconi anemia (FA) patients are highly susceptible to solid tumors at multiple anatomical sites including head and neck region. A subset of head and neck cancers (HNCs) is associated with 'high-risk' HPVs, particularly HPV16. However, the correlation between HPV oncogenes and cancers in FA patients is still unclear. We previously learned that FA deficiency in mice predisposes HPV16 E7 transgenic mice to HNCs. To address HPV16 E6's oncogenic potential under FA deficiency in HNCs, we utilized HPV16 E6-transgenic mice (K14E6) and HPV16 E6/E7-bi-transgenic mice (K14E6E7) on genetic backgrounds sufficient or deficient for one of the fanc genes, fancD2 and monitored their susceptibility to HNCs. K14E6 mice failed to develop tumor. However, E6 and fancD2-deficiency accelerated E7-driven tumor development in K14E6E7 mice. The increased tumor incidence was more correlated with E7-driven DNA damage than proliferation. We also found that deficiency of pocket proteins, pRb, p107, and p130 that are well-established targets of E7, could recapitulate E7's induction of DNA damage. Our findings support the hypothesis that E7 induces HPV-associated HNCs by promoting DNA damage through the inactivation of pocket proteins, which explains why a deficiency in DNA damage repair would increase susceptibility to E7-driven cancer. Our results further demonstrate the unexpected finding that FA deficiency does not predispose E6 transgenic mice to HNCs, indicating a specificity in the synergy between FA deficiency and HPV oncogenes in causing HNCs.
Authors
Park, JW; Shin, M-K; Pitot, HC; Lambert, PF
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1411009
PMID
24086435
Source
pubmed
Published In
Plos One
Volume
8
Published Date
Start Page
e75056
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0075056

Deficiencies in the Fanconi anemia DNA damage response pathway increase sensitivity to HPV-associated head and neck cancer.

Patients with the rare genetic disease, Fanconi anemia (FA), are highly susceptible to squamous cell carcinomas arising at multiple anatomic sites including the head and neck region. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs), particularly HPV16, are associated with ∼20% of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) in the general population. Some but not other investigators have reported that HNSCCs in FA patients are much more frequently positive for HPV. In addition, studies have demonstrated an interaction between the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein and the FA pathway, a DNA damage response pathway deficient in FA patients. On the basis of these studies, it was hypothesized that the FA pathway contributes to repair of DNA damage induced by HPV16 E7, providing one explanation for why FA patients are predisposed to HPV-associated HNSCCs. To determine the importance of the FA pathway in modulating the oncogenic abilities of E7, we crossed K14E7 transgenic (K14E7) and fancD2 knockout mice (FancD2(-/-)) to establish K14E7/FancD2(-/-) and K14E7/FancD2(+/+) mice and monitored their susceptibility to HNSCC when treated with a chemical carcinogen. K14E7/FancD2(-/-) mice had a significantly higher incidence of HNSCC compared with K14E7/FancD2(+/+) mice. This difference correlated with an increased proliferative index and the increase in expression of biomarkers that are used to assess levels of DNA damage. These animal studies support the hypotheses that FA patients have increased susceptibility to HPV-associated cancer and that the FA DNA damage response pathway normally attenuates the oncogenic potential of HPV16 E7.
Authors
Park, JW; Pitot, HC; Strati, K; Spardy, N; Duensing, S; Grompe, M; Lambert, PF
MLA Citation
Park, Jung Wook, et al. “Deficiencies in the Fanconi anemia DNA damage response pathway increase sensitivity to HPV-associated head and neck cancer..” Cancer Res, vol. 70, no. 23, Dec. 2010, pp. 9959–68. Pubmed, doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-10-1291.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1411010
PMID
20935219
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Res
Volume
70
Published Date
Start Page
9959
End Page
9968
DOI
10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-10-1291

A proteomic approach for dissecting H-Ras signaling networks in NIH/3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells

Authors
Park, JW; Kim, S; Bahk, YY
MLA Citation
Park, Jung Wook, et al. “A proteomic approach for dissecting H-Ras signaling networks in NIH/3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells.” Proteomics, vol. 6, no. 8, Wiley, Apr. 2006, pp. 2433–43. Crossref, doi:10.1002/pmic.200500688.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1414263
Source
crossref
Published In
Proteomics
Volume
6
Published Date
Start Page
2433
End Page
2443
DOI
10.1002/pmic.200500688