Steven Patierno

Overview:

Patierno's current translational research interests are focused on the genomics molecular biology of cancer disparities, cancer biology, molecular pharmacology and targeted experimental therapeutics to control prostate, breast and lung tumor aggressiveness. He is an internationally recognized expert in cancer control, cancer causation and molecular carcinogenesis, which includes a broad spectrum of laboratory and population level research.   Patierno is also actively engaged in cancer health disparities and healthcare delivery research focused on patient navigation, survivorship, community-based interventions, mHealth, implementation sciences, cancer care economics, and policy.

Positions:

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Professor of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology

Pharmacology & Cancer Biology
School of Medicine

Professor in Family Medicine and Community Health

Family Medicine and Community Health
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.S. 1981

University of Connecticut

Ph.D. 1985

University of Texas Medical School at Houston

Postdoctoral Training, Norris Comprehensive Cancer

University of Southern California

Grants:

3D Biology Signatures defined by Nanostring Max System

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Role
Major User
Start Date
End Date

Identification of Genetic Determinates for Disparities in African American Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Awarded By
V Foundation for Cancer Research
Role
Significant Contributor
Start Date
End Date

Targeting RNA splicing in race-related aggressive and lethal prostate cancer

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

PC150506: Small molecule targeting of RNA splice variants driving tumor aggressiveness

Administered By
Chemistry
Role
Collaborator
Start Date
End Date

2/2 NCCU-DUKE Cancer Disparities Translational Research Partnership

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Findings from the National Navigation Roundtable: A call for competency-based patient navigation training.

Authors
Valverde, PA; Burhansstipanov, L; Patierno, S; Gentry, S; Dwyer, A; Wysocki, KL; Patterson, AK; Krebs, LU; Sellers, J; Johnston, D
MLA Citation
Valverde, Patricia A., et al. “Findings from the National Navigation Roundtable: A call for competency-based patient navigation training..” Cancer, vol. 125, no. 24, Dec. 2019, pp. 4350–59. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cncr.32470.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1409904
PMID
31503340
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Volume
125
Published Date
Start Page
4350
End Page
4359
DOI
10.1002/cncr.32470

Perspectives on Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC) Research, Clinical Management and Community Engagement from the Duke IBC Consortium.

Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is an understudied and aggressive form of breast cancer with a poor prognosis, accounting for 2-6% of new breast cancer diagnoses but 10% of all breast cancer-related deaths in the United States. Currently there are no therapeutic regimens developed specifically for IBC, and it is critical to recognize that all aspects of treating IBC - including staging, diagnosis, and therapy - are vastly different than other breast cancers. In December 2014, under the umbrella of an interdisciplinary initiative supported by the Duke School of Medicine, researchers, clinicians, research administrators, and patient advocates formed the Duke Consortium for IBC to address the needs of patients in North Carolina (an ethnically and economically diverse state with 100 counties) and across the Southeastern United States. The primary goal of this group is to translate research into action and improve both awareness and patient care through collaborations with local, national and international IBC programs. The consortium held its inaugural meeting on Feb 28, 2018, which also marked Rare Disease Day and convened national research experts, clinicians, patients, advocates, government representatives, foundation leaders, staff, and trainees. The meeting focused on new developments and challenges in the clinical management of IBC, research challenges and opportunities, and an interactive session to garner input from patients, advocates, and community partners that would inform a strategic plan toward continuing improvements in IBC patient care, research, and education.
Authors
Devi, GR; Hough, H; Barrett, N; Cristofanilli, M; Overmoyer, B; Spector, N; Ueno, NT; Woodward, W; Kirkpatrick, J; Vincent, B; Williams, KP; Finley, C; Duff, B; Worthy, V; McCall, S; Hollister, BA; Palmer, G; Force, J; Westbrook, K; Fayanju, O; Suneja, G; Dent, SF; Hwang, ES; Patierno, SR; Marcom, PK
MLA Citation
Devi, Gayathri R., et al. “Perspectives on Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC) Research, Clinical Management and Community Engagement from the Duke IBC Consortium..” J Cancer, vol. 10, no. 15, 2019, pp. 3344–51. Pubmed, doi:10.7150/jca.31176.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1395729
PMID
31293637
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Cancer
Volume
10
Published Date
Start Page
3344
End Page
3351
DOI
10.7150/jca.31176

Single-nucleotide polymorphisms of stemness genes predicted to regulate RNA splicing, microRNA and oncogenic signaling are associated with prostate cancer survival.

Prostate cancer (PCa) is a clinically and molecularly heterogeneous disease, with variation in outcomes only partially predicted by grade and stage. Additional tools to distinguish indolent from aggressive disease are needed. Phenotypic characteristics of stemness correlate with poor cancer prognosis. Given this correlation, we identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of stemness-related genes and examined their associations with PCa survival. SNPs within stemness-related genes were analyzed for association with overall survival of PCa in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Significant SNPs predicted to be functional were selected for linkage disequilibrium analysis and combined and stratified analyses. Identified SNPs were evaluated for association with gene expression. SNPs of CD44 (rs9666607), ABCC1 (rs35605 and rs212091) and GDF15 (rs1058587) were associated with PCa survival and predicted to be functional. A role for rs9666607 of CD44 and rs35605 of ABCC1 in RNA splicing regulation, rs212091 of ABCC1 in miRNA binding site activity and rs1058587 of GDF15 in causing an amino acid change was predicted. These SNPs represent potential novel prognostic markers for overall survival of PCa and support a contribution of the stemness pathway to PCa patient outcome.
Authors
Freedman, JA; Wang, Y; Li, X; Liu, H; Moorman, PG; George, DJ; Lee, NH; Hyslop, T; Wei, Q; Patierno, SR
MLA Citation
Freedman, Jennifer A., et al. “Single-nucleotide polymorphisms of stemness genes predicted to regulate RNA splicing, microRNA and oncogenic signaling are associated with prostate cancer survival..” Carcinogenesis, vol. 39, no. 7, July 2018, pp. 879–88. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/carcin/bgy062.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1315762
PMID
29726910
Source
pubmed
Published In
Carcinogenesis
Volume
39
Published Date
Start Page
879
End Page
888
DOI
10.1093/carcin/bgy062

Abstract B18: Development of novel therapeutic splice-switching oligonucleotides against aggressive prostate cancer in men of African descent

Authors
MLA Citation
Freedman, Jennifer A., et al. “Abstract B18: Development of novel therapeutic splice-switching oligonucleotides against aggressive prostate cancer in men of African descent.” Cell, Molecular, and Tumor Biology, American Association for Cancer Research, 2016. Crossref, doi:10.1158/1538-7755.disp15-b18.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1149425
Source
crossref
Published In
Cell, Molecular, and Tumor Biology
Published Date
DOI
10.1158/1538-7755.disp15-b18

Costs and outcomes evaluation of patient navigation after abnormal cancer screening: Evidence From the Patient Navigation Research Program

Authors
Bensink, ME; Ramsey, SD; Battaglia, T; Fiscella, K; Hurd, TC; Mckoy, JM; Patierno, SR; Raich, PC; Seiber, EE; Warren-Mears, V; Whitley, E; Paskett, ED; Mandelblatt, S
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub999993
Source
scopus
Published In
Cancer
Published Date