Katherine Peters

Positions:

Associate Professor of Neurosurgery

Neurosurgery, Neuro-Oncology
School of Medicine

Associate Professor in Neurology

Neurology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2003

Stanford University

Ph.D. 2003

Stanford University

Intern, Medicine

Johns Hopkins University

Resident and Fellow in Neurology, Neurology

Johns Hopkins University

Fellow in Neuro-Oncology, Surgery

Duke University

Grants:

PVSRIPO alone or in combination with Lomustine in recurrent WHO grade IV glioma patients

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Agios Perioperative in Recurrent IDH1 LGG (AG120-881-C-001)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Functional Capacity and Physical Function in Glioblastoma Patients Treated with or without Tumor-Treating Fields

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Study for Management of Ocular Side Effects in Subjects with EGFR-Amplified Glioblastoma receiving Depatuxizumab Mafodotin

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A randomized phase 2 single blind study of temo plus XRT combined with nivolumab or placebo

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Impact of glioblastoma (GBM)-related cognitive dysfunction (CD) on caregiver burden: Preliminary results from multi-site study in the U.S.

<jats:p> 16 </jats:p><jats:p> Background: GBM is a largely incurable, highly aggressive cancer with high incidence of CD. Caregivers face heightened stress with loved one’s limited life expectancy and additional duties. To better understand this unique group, a survey tool was developed to examine effect of CD on caregiver burden. Methods: Four of 10 planned academic centers are enrolling towards achieving 200+ completed surveys. The survey was developed step-wise: 1) literature review of primary brain tumors, Alzheimer’s disease, and dementia to identify domains; 2) focus groups with neurooncologists and American Brain Tumor Association advocates to narrow domains; 3) caregiver interviews to verify selected domains; 4) single-site pilot study to confirm content (n=20). Dyads with caregiver survey and respective patient’s clinical data are created as possible. Results: Complete data from 31 caregivers and 28 dyads enrolled at Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah and University of California, Los Angeles are currently available. Response rate was 88% for caregivers and 90% for patients. Among caregivers, 87% were patient spouse/partner, 84% female, average age 56 years, 42% currently employed, 32% have no additional help, and 26% are primary caregivers for others. Patients were male (74%), average age 59 years, not working (84%), and being treated for initial diagnosis (67%). Proportion of caregivers performing ≥ 1 caregiving task, i.e. meal preparation, doubled from before to after diagnosis (48% vs. 97%). The majority of caregivers (90%) perceived memory problems in a loved one over last 14 days. Trouble remembering recent events or things interfered with 71% of caregivers’ daily life "somewhat", "quite a bit", or "very much". When ranking effect of CD on caregiver’s general quality of life on a scale of 0 (none) to 10 (significant), 60% and 23% of caregivers indicated ≥ 5 and ≥ 8, respectively. Caregivers’ responses to survey satisfaction questions showed only 23% feel enough is being done to understand caregiving in GBM and 76% were satisfied overall with the survey. Conclusions: Caregivers are affected daily and significantly by GBM-related CD. Results will be updated at time of presentation. </jats:p>
Authors
Au, TH; Bauer, H; Menon, J; Willis, C; Iacob, E; Ma, J; Watanabe, A; Nelson, R; Korytowsky, B; Singh, P; Marshall, A; Willmarth, N; Nghiemphu, PL; Dovek, L; Peters, KB; Balajonda, B; Cohen, AL; Colman, H; Stenehjem, DD; Brixner, DI
MLA Citation
Au, Trang H., et al. “Impact of glioblastoma (GBM)-related cognitive dysfunction (CD) on caregiver burden: Preliminary results from multi-site study in the U.S..” Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 36, no. 34_suppl, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), 2018, pp. 16–16. Crossref, doi:10.1200/jco.2018.36.34_suppl.16.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1383951
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
36
Published Date
Start Page
16
End Page
16
DOI
10.1200/jco.2018.36.34_suppl.16

Second primary cancers in long-term survivors of glioblastoma.

Background: Overall survival (OS) in glioblastoma (GBM) is poor at an average of 14 to 18 months, and long-term survivors (LTS) of GBM are rare. LTS of GBM, defined as surviving >5 years postdiagnosis, represent only 2% to 10% of all GBM patients. LTS of cancer are at high risk of developing second primary neoplasms. This study looks at occurrences of second primary neoplasms in LTS of GBM. Methods: Records from adult patients newly diagnosed with GBM between January 1, 1998 and February 8, 2010, were retrospectively reviewed to identify LTS, defined as patients who survived ≥5 years. We focused on the identification of a new diagnosis of cancer occurring at least 2 years after the initial GBM diagnosis. Results: We identified 155 LTS of GBM, with a median OS of 11.0 years (95% CI: 9.0 to 13.1 years) and a median follow-up of 9.6 years (95% CI: 8.7 to 10.7 years). In this cohort of patients, 13 (8.4%) LTS of GBM developed 17 secondary cancers. Eight could potentially be attributed to previous radiation and chemotherapy (skin cancer in radiation field [n = 4], leukemia [n = 2], low-grade glioma [n = 1], and sarcoma of the scalp [n = 1]). The other 9 cases included melanoma (n = 2), prostate cancer (n = 2), bladder cancer (n = 1), endometrioid adenocarcinoma (n = 1), basal cell carcinoma (n = 1), and renal cell carcinoma (n = 1). Conclusions: Although second primary cancers are rare in GBM LTS, providers should continue close monitoring with appropriate oncologic care. Moreover, this highlights the need for survivorship care of patients with GBM.
Authors
Kim, J-Y; Jackman, JG; Woodring, S; McSherry, F; Herndon, JE; Desjardins, A; Friedman, HS; Peters, KB
MLA Citation
Kim, Jung-Young, et al. “Second primary cancers in long-term survivors of glioblastoma..” Neurooncol Pract, vol. 6, no. 5, Sept. 2019, pp. 386–91. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/nop/npz001.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1411790
PMID
31555453
Source
pubmed
Published In
Neuro Oncology Practice
Volume
6
Published Date
Start Page
386
End Page
391
DOI
10.1093/nop/npz001

Outcomes Following Adjuvant Radiation Therapy in Elderly Patients with Glioblastoma: A Retrospective Single Institution Analysis

Authors
Lee, JWC; Johnson, MO; Kirkpatrick, JP; McSherry, F; Herndon, J; Lipp, ES; Desjardins, A; Randazzo, D; Friedman, HS; Ashley, DM; Peters, KB
MLA Citation
Lee, J. W. C., et al. “Outcomes Following Adjuvant Radiation Therapy in Elderly Patients with Glioblastoma: A Retrospective Single Institution Analysis.” International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics, vol. 105, no. 1, Elsevier BV, 2019, pp. E102–E102. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2019.06.2296.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1414293
Source
crossref
Published In
International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics
Volume
105
Published Date
Start Page
E102
End Page
E102
DOI
10.1016/j.ijrobp.2019.06.2296

First in Human Clinical Trial of a Metalloporphyrin Dual Radioprotectant and Radiosensitizer, BMX-001, in Newly Diagnosed High-Grade Glioma Undergoing Concurrent Chemoradiation

Authors
Peters, KB; Kirkpatrick, JP; Batinic-Haberle, I; Affronti, ML; Woodring, S; Iden, D; Lipp, ES; Boyd, K; Healy, P; Herndon, J; Spasojevic, I; Penchev, S; Gad, S; Silberstein, D; Johnson, MO; Randazzo, D; Desjardins, A; Friedman, HS; Ashley, DM; Crapo, J
MLA Citation
Peters, K. B., et al. “First in Human Clinical Trial of a Metalloporphyrin Dual Radioprotectant and Radiosensitizer, BMX-001, in Newly Diagnosed High-Grade Glioma Undergoing Concurrent Chemoradiation.” International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics, vol. 105, no. 1, Elsevier BV, 2019, pp. E106–E106. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2019.06.2305.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1415097
Source
crossref
Published In
International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics
Volume
105
Published Date
Start Page
E106
End Page
E106
DOI
10.1016/j.ijrobp.2019.06.2305

Safety of pembrolizumab in combination with bevacizumab in recurrent glioblastoma (rGBM).

Authors
Reardon, DA; De Groot, JF; Colman, H; Jordan, JT; Daras, M; Clarke, JL; Nghiemphu, PL; Gaffey, SC; Peters, KB
MLA Citation
Reardon, David A., et al. “Safety of pembrolizumab in combination with bevacizumab in recurrent glioblastoma (rGBM)..” Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 34, no. 15_suppl, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), 2016, pp. 2010–2010. Crossref, doi:10.1200/jco.2016.34.15_suppl.2010.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1393485
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
34
Published Date
Start Page
2010
End Page
2010
DOI
10.1200/jco.2016.34.15_suppl.2010