Katherine Peters

Positions:

Associate Professor of Neurosurgery

Neurosurgery, Neuro-Oncology
School of Medicine

Associate Professor in Neurology

Neurology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2003

Stanford University

Ph.D. 2003

Stanford University

Intern, Medicine

Johns Hopkins University

Resident and Fellow in Neurology, Neurology

Johns Hopkins University

Fellow in Neuro-Oncology, Surgery

Duke University

Grants:

Ph 1/2 trial BMX-001

Administered By
Neurosurgery, Neuro-Oncology
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Agios Perioperative in Recurrent IDH1 LGG (AG120-881-C-001)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Functional Capacity and Physical Function in Glioblastoma Patients Treated with or without Tumor-Treating Fields

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Study for Management of Ocular Side Effects in Subjects with EGFR-Amplified Glioblastoma receiving Depatuxizumab Mafodotin

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A randomized phase 2 single blind study of temo plus XRT combined with nivolumab or placebo

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Safety and efficacy of VB-111, an anticancer gene therapy, in patients with recurrent glioblastoma: results of a phase I/II study.

BACKGROUND: VB-111 is a non-replicating adenovirus carrying a Fas-chimera transgene, leading to targeted apoptosis of tumor vascular endothelium and induction of a tumor-specific immune response. This phase I/II study evaluated the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of VB-111 with and without bevacizumab in recurrent glioblastoma (rGBM). METHODS: Patients with rGBM (n = 72) received VB-111 in 4 treatment groups: subtherapeutic (VB-111 dose escalation), limited exposure (LE; VB-111 monotherapy until progression), primed combination (VB-111 monotherapy continued upon progression with combination of bevacizumab), and unprimed combination (upfront combination of VB-111 and bevacizumab). The primary endpoint was median overall survival (OS). Secondary endpoints were safety, overall response rate, and progression-free survival (PFS). RESULTS: VB-111 was well tolerated. The most common adverse event was transient mild-moderate fever. Median OS time was significantly longer in the primed combination group compared with both LE (414 vs 223 days; hazard ratio [HR], 0.48; P = 0.043) and unprimed combination (414 vs 141.5 days; HR, 0.24; P = 0.0056). Patients in the combination phase of the primed combination group had a median PFS time of 90 days compared with 60 in the LE group (HR, 0.36; P = 0.032), and 63 in the unprimed combination group (P = 0.72). Radiographic responders to VB-111 exhibited characteristic, expansive areas of necrosis in the areas of initial enhancing disease. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with rGBM who were primed with VB-111 monotherapy that continued after progression with the addition of bevacizumab showed significant survival and PFS advantage, as well as specific imaging characteristics related to VB-111 mechanism of action. These results warrant further assessment in a randomized controlled study.
Authors
Brenner, AJ; Peters, KB; Vredenburgh, J; Bokstein, F; Blumenthal, DT; Yust-Katz, S; Peretz, I; Oberman, B; Freedman, LS; Ellingson, BM; Cloughesy, TF; Sher, N; Cohen, YC; Lowenton-Spier, N; Rachmilewitz Minei, T; Yakov, N; Mendel, I; Breitbart, E; Wen, PY
MLA Citation
Brenner, Andrew J., et al. “Safety and efficacy of VB-111, an anticancer gene therapy, in patients with recurrent glioblastoma: results of a phase I/II study.Neuro Oncol, vol. 22, no. 5, May 2020, pp. 694–704. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/neuonc/noz231.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1424985
PMID
31844886
Source
pubmed
Published In
Neuro Oncol
Volume
22
Published Date
Start Page
694
End Page
704
DOI
10.1093/neuonc/noz231

Recurrent Extradural Myxopapillary Ependymoma With Oligometastatic Spread.

Myxopapillary ependymomas are a slow-growing, grade I type glial tumor in the lumbosacral region. More rarely, they can present as extradural, subcutaneous sacrococcygeal, or perisacral masses, and it is under these circumstances that they are more likely to spread. Here, we report the presentation of a sacrococcygeal mass in patient that was initially resected confirming extradural myxopapillary ependymoma. At initial resection, multiple small pulmonary nodules were detected. This mass recurred 2 years later at the resection site with an interval increase in the previously imaged pulmonary nodules. Resection of both the post-sacral mass and largest lung metastasis confirmed recurrent myxopapillary ependymoma with oligometastatic spread. Because these tumors are rare, with extradural presentation being even more infrequent, to this date there are no definitive therapeutic guidelines for initial treatment and continued surveillance. For myxopapillary ependymoma, current standard of care is first-line maximal surgical resection with or without postoperative radiotherapy depending on the extent of disease and extent of resection. However, there remains insufficient evidence on the role of radiotherapy to oligometastatic foci in providing any further survival benefit or extending time to recurrence. Thus, prospective studies assessing the role of upfront treatment of oligometastases with local resection and adjuvant radiotherapy are needed for improved understanding of extradural myxopapillary ependymoma.
Authors
Batich, KA; Riedel, RF; Kirkpatrick, JP; Tong, BC; Eward, WC; Tan, CL; Pittman, PD; McLendon, RE; Peters, KB
MLA Citation
Batich, Kristen A., et al. “Recurrent Extradural Myxopapillary Ependymoma With Oligometastatic Spread.Front Oncol, vol. 9, 2019, p. 1322. Pubmed, doi:10.3389/fonc.2019.01322.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1424463
PMID
31850213
Source
pubmed
Published In
Frontiers in Oncology
Volume
9
Published Date
Start Page
1322
DOI
10.3389/fonc.2019.01322

Ofranogene obadenovec (VB-111), an anti-cancer gene therapy in combination with bevacizumab to improve overall survival compared to bevacizumab monotherapy in patients with rGBM: A phase 2 historically controlled trial.

Authors
Brenner, AJ; Cohen, YC; Vredenburgh, JJ; Peters, KB; Nayak, L; Blumenthal, DT; Bokstein, F; Breitbart, E; Bangio, L; Sher, N; Leubitz, AR; Yust-Katz, S; Peretz, I; Freedman, LS; Olmer, L; Wen, PY
MLA Citation
Brenner, Andrew Jacob, et al. “Ofranogene obadenovec (VB-111), an anti-cancer gene therapy in combination with bevacizumab to improve overall survival compared to bevacizumab monotherapy in patients with rGBM: A phase 2 historically controlled trial.Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 34, no. 15_suppl, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), 2016, pp. 2074–2074. Crossref, doi:10.1200/jco.2016.34.15_suppl.2074.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1393998
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
34
Published Date
Start Page
2074
End Page
2074
DOI
10.1200/jco.2016.34.15_suppl.2074

Second primary cancers in long-term survivors of glioblastoma.

Background: Overall survival (OS) in glioblastoma (GBM) is poor at an average of 14 to 18 months, and long-term survivors (LTS) of GBM are rare. LTS of GBM, defined as surviving >5 years postdiagnosis, represent only 2% to 10% of all GBM patients. LTS of cancer are at high risk of developing second primary neoplasms. This study looks at occurrences of second primary neoplasms in LTS of GBM. Methods: Records from adult patients newly diagnosed with GBM between January 1, 1998 and February 8, 2010, were retrospectively reviewed to identify LTS, defined as patients who survived ≥5 years. We focused on the identification of a new diagnosis of cancer occurring at least 2 years after the initial GBM diagnosis. Results: We identified 155 LTS of GBM, with a median OS of 11.0 years (95% CI: 9.0 to 13.1 years) and a median follow-up of 9.6 years (95% CI: 8.7 to 10.7 years). In this cohort of patients, 13 (8.4%) LTS of GBM developed 17 secondary cancers. Eight could potentially be attributed to previous radiation and chemotherapy (skin cancer in radiation field [n = 4], leukemia [n = 2], low-grade glioma [n = 1], and sarcoma of the scalp [n = 1]). The other 9 cases included melanoma (n = 2), prostate cancer (n = 2), bladder cancer (n = 1), endometrioid adenocarcinoma (n = 1), basal cell carcinoma (n = 1), and renal cell carcinoma (n = 1). Conclusions: Although second primary cancers are rare in GBM LTS, providers should continue close monitoring with appropriate oncologic care. Moreover, this highlights the need for survivorship care of patients with GBM.
Authors
Kim, J-Y; Jackman, JG; Woodring, S; McSherry, F; Herndon, JE; Desjardins, A; Friedman, HS; Peters, KB
MLA Citation
Kim, Jung-Young, et al. “Second primary cancers in long-term survivors of glioblastoma.Neurooncol Pract, vol. 6, no. 5, Sept. 2019, pp. 386–91. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/nop/npz001.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1411790
PMID
31555453
Source
pubmed
Published In
Neuro Oncology Practice
Volume
6
Published Date
Start Page
386
End Page
391
DOI
10.1093/nop/npz001

Outcomes Following Adjuvant Radiation Therapy in Elderly Patients with Glioblastoma: A Retrospective Single Institution Analysis

Authors
Lee, JWC; Johnson, MO; Kirkpatrick, JP; McSherry, F; Herndon, J; Lipp, ES; Desjardins, A; Randazzo, D; Friedman, HS; Ashley, DM; Peters, KB
MLA Citation
Lee, J. W. C., et al. “Outcomes Following Adjuvant Radiation Therapy in Elderly Patients with Glioblastoma: A Retrospective Single Institution Analysis.” International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics, vol. 105, no. 1, Elsevier BV, 2019, pp. E102–E102. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2019.06.2296.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1414293
Source
crossref
Published In
International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics
Volume
105
Published Date
Start Page
E102
End Page
E102
DOI
10.1016/j.ijrobp.2019.06.2296