Katherine Peters

Overview:

Dr. Katy Peters, MD Ph.D. FAAN is an associate professor of neurology and neurosurgery at the Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center (PRTBTC) at Duke.   Her academic medical career started at Stanford University School of Medicine, receiving an MD and Ph.D. in Cancer Biology.  After completing a neurology residency at Johns Hopkins University and a fellowship in cognitive neurosciences, Katy joined the PRTBTC as a neuro-oncology fellow.  In 2009, she became a faculty member at PRTBTC.  With a fantastic team of nursing and advanced practice providers, she actively sees and cares for patients with primary brain tumors.  Her research interests include supportive care for brain cancer patients, cognitive dysfunction in cancer patients, and physical function and activity of brain cancer patients.   While she runs clinical trials to treat primary brain tumors, her key interest is on clinical trials that focus on improving brain tumor patients' quality of life and cognition.   In 2019, the PRTBTC designated her as the Director of Supportive Care, thus furthering the PRTBTC and her committee to better the quality of life for brain tumor patients.   She is active in teaching medical school students, residents, fellows, and advanced practice providers and is the Program Director of the PRTBRC neuro-oncology fellowship.     She is board certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology and the United Council of Neurologic Subspecialties for neuro-oncology.

Positions:

Associate Professor of Neurosurgery

Neurosurgery, Neuro-Oncology
School of Medicine

Vice Chair for Education in the Department of Neurology

Neurology
School of Medicine

Associate Professor in Neurology

Neurology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2003

Stanford University

Ph.D. 2003

Stanford University

Intern, Medicine

Johns Hopkins University

Resident and Fellow in Neurology, Neurology

Johns Hopkins University

Fellow in Neuro-Oncology, Surgery

Duke University

Grants:

Ph 1/2 Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed High Grade Glioma Treated with Concurrent Radiation Therapy, Temozolomide, and BMX-001

Administered By
Neurosurgery, Neuro-Oncology
Awarded By
BioMimetix JV LLC
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase 1, Multicenter, Randomized, Controlled, Open-label, Perioperative Study of AG-120 and AG-881 in Subjects with Recurrent, Non-enhancing, IDH1 Mutant, Low-grade Glioma. (AG120-881-C-001)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Agios Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Functional Capacity and Physical Function in Glioblastoma Patients Treated with or without Tumor-Treating Fields

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Novocure
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Study for Management of Ocular Side Effects in Subjects with EGFR-Amplified Glioblastoma receiving Depatuxizumab Mafodotin

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
AbbVie Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A randomized phase 2 single blind study of temozolomide plus radiation therapy combined with nivolumab or placebo in newly diagnosed adult subjects with MGMT-methylated glioblastoma (BMS CA209-548)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Bristol-Myers Squibb Company
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Radiation Therapy for IDH-Mutant Grade 2 and Grade 3 Diffuse Glioma: An ASTRO Clinical Practice Guideline.

PURPOSE: This guideline provides evidence-based recommendations for adults with isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)-mutant grade 2 and grade 3 diffuse glioma, as classified in the 2021 World Health Organization (WHO) Classification of Tumours. It includes indications for radiation therapy (RT), advanced RT techniques, and clinical management of adverse effects. METHODS: The American Society for Radiation Oncology convened a multidisciplinary task force to address 4 key questions focused on the RT management of patients with IDH-mutant grade 2 and grade 3 diffuse glioma. Recommendations were based on a systematic literature review and created using a predefined consensus-building methodology and system for grading evidence quality and recommendation strength. RESULTS: A strong recommendation for close surveillance alone was made for patients with oligodendroglioma, IDH-mutant, 1p/19q codeleted, WHO grade 2 after gross total resection without high-risk features. For oligodendroglioma, WHO grade 2 with any high-risk features, adjuvant RT was conditionally recommended. However, adjuvant RT was strongly recommended for oligodendroglioma, WHO grade 3. A conditional recommendation for close surveillance alone was made for astrocytoma, IDH-mutant, WHO grade 2 after gross total resection without high-risk features. Adjuvant RT was conditionally recommended for astrocytoma, WHO grade 2, with any high-risk features and strongly recommended for astrocytoma, WHO grade 3. Dose recommendations varied based on histology and grade. Given known adverse long-term effects of RT, consideration for advanced techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy/volumetric modulated arc therapy or proton therapy were given as strong and conditional recommendations, respectively. Finally, based on expert opinion, the guideline recommends assessment, surveillance, and management for toxicity management. CONCLUSIONS: Based on published data, the American Society for Radiation Oncology task force has proposed recommendations to inform the management of adults with IDH-mutant grade 2 and grade 3 diffuse glioma as defined by WHO 2021 classification, based on the highest quality published data, and best translated by our task force of subject matter experts.
Authors
Halasz, LM; Attia, A; Bradfield, L; Brat, DJ; Kirkpatrick, JP; Laack, NN; Lalani, N; Lebow, ES; Liu, AK; Niemeier, HM; Palmer, JD; Peters, KB; Sheehan, J; Thomas, RP; Vora, SA; Wahl, DR; Weiss, SE; Yeboa, DN; Zhong, J; Shih, HA
MLA Citation
Halasz, Lia M., et al. “Radiation Therapy for IDH-Mutant Grade 2 and Grade 3 Diffuse Glioma: An ASTRO Clinical Practice Guideline.Pract Radiat Oncol, May 2022. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.prro.2022.05.004.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1530273
PMID
35902341
Source
pubmed
Published In
Pract Radiat Oncol
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.prro.2022.05.004

Long-Term Outcomes for Patients With Atypical or Malignant Meningiomas Treated With or Without Radiation Therapy: A 25-Year Retrospective Analysis of a Single-Institution Experience.

Purpose: Atypical (World Health Organization [WHO] grade 2) and malignant (WHO grade 3) meningiomas have high rates of local recurrence, and questions remain about the role of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) for patients with WHO grade 2 disease. These patients frequently require salvage therapy, and optimal management is uncertain given limited prospective data. We report on the long-term outcomes for patients with atypical and malignant meningiomas treated with surgery and/or RT at our institution. Methods and Materials: Data were collected through a retrospective chart review for all patients with WHO grade 2 or 3 meningiomas treated with surgery and/or RT at our institution between January 1992 and March 2017. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were described using the KaplanMeier estimator. The outcomes in the subgroups were compared with a log-rank test. A Cox proportional hazards model was used for the univariable and multivariable analyses of predictors of PFS. Results: A total of 66 patients were included in this analysis. The median follow-up was 12.4 years overall and 8.6 years among surviving patients. Fifty-two patients (78.8%) had WHO grade 2 meningiomas, and 14 patients (21.2%) had WHO grade 3 disease. Thirty-six patients (54.5%) were treated with surgery alone, 28 patients (42.4%) with surgery and adjuvant RT, and 2 patients (3%) with RT alone. Median PFS and OS were 3.2 years and 8.8 years, respectively. PFS was significantly improved with adjuvant RT compared with surgery alone (hazard ratio, 0.36; 95% confidence interval, 0.18-0.70). Patients with Ki-67 index >10% showed a trend toward worse PFS compared with patients with Ki-67 ≤10% (hazard ratio, 0.51; 95% confidence interval, 0.25-1.04). No significant differences in PFS or OS were observed with respect to Simpson or WHO grade. Conclusions: For patients with atypical or malignant meningiomas, adjuvant RT was associated with significantly improved PFS, and Ki-67 index >10% was associated with a trend toward worse PFS. Given the long-term survival, high recurrence rates, and efficacy of salvage therapy, patients with atypical and malignant meningiomas should be monitored systematically long after initial treatment.
Authors
Kent, CL; Mowery, YM; Babatunde, O; Wright, AO; Barak, I; McSherry, F; Herndon, JE; Friedman, AH; Zomorodi, A; Peters, K; Desjardins, A; Friedman, H; Sperduto, W; Kirkpatrick, JP
MLA Citation
Kent, Collin L., et al. “Long-Term Outcomes for Patients With Atypical or Malignant Meningiomas Treated With or Without Radiation Therapy: A 25-Year Retrospective Analysis of a Single-Institution Experience.Adv Radiat Oncol, vol. 7, no. 3, May 2022, p. 100878. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.adro.2021.100878.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1510656
PMID
35647401
Source
pubmed
Published In
Advances in Radiation Oncology
Volume
7
Published Date
Start Page
100878
DOI
10.1016/j.adro.2021.100878

INDIGO: A global, randomized, double-blind, phase III study of vorasidenib (VOR; AG-881) vs placebo in patients (pts) with residual or recurrent grade II glioma with an isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 (IDH1/2) mutation.

Authors
Mellinghoff, IK; Van den Bent, MJ; Clarke, JL; Maher, EA; Peters, KB; Touat, M; De Groot, JF; De La Fuente, MI; Arrillaga-Romany, I; Wick, W; Ellingson, BM; Schoenfeld, S; Tai, F; Le, K; Lu, M; Steelman, L; Hassan, I; Pandya, SS; Wen, PY; Cloughesy, TF
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1476153
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
38
Published Date

Cold Plasma Discharge Tube Enhances Antitumoral Efficacy of Temozolomide.

Glioblastoma (GBM) is a fatal human brain tumor with a low survival rate. Temozolomide (TMZ) has been widely used in GBM therapy with noticeable side effects. Cold plasma is an ionized gas that is generated near room temperature. Here, we demonstrated the enhancement therapeutic efficacy of TMZ via using a cold plasma source based on nonequilibrium plasma in a sealed glass tube, named a radial cold plasma discharge tube (PDT). The PDT affected glioblastoma cells' function just by its electromagnetic (EM) emission rather than any chemical factors in the plasma. The PDT selectively increased the cytotoxicity of TMZ on two typical glioblastoma cell lines, U87MG and A172, compared with normal astrocyte cell line hTERT/E6/E7 to some extent. Furthermore, on the basis of a patient-derived xenograft model, our preliminary in vivo studies demonstrated the drastically improved mean survival days of the tumor-barrier mice by more than 100% compared to control. The PDT is not only independent of continuous helium supply but is also capable of resisting the interference of environmental changes. Thus, the PDT was a stable and low-cost cold atmospheric plasma source. In short, this study is the first to demonstrate the promising application of PDTs in GBM therapy as a noninvasive and portable modality.
Authors
Yao, X; Yan, D; Lin, L; Sherman, JH; Peters, KB; Keir, ST; Keidar, M
MLA Citation
Yao, Xiaoliang, et al. “Cold Plasma Discharge Tube Enhances Antitumoral Efficacy of Temozolomide.Acs Appl Bio Mater, vol. 5, no. 4, Apr. 2022, pp. 1610–23. Pubmed, doi:10.1021/acsabm.2c00018.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1513625
PMID
35324138
Source
pubmed
Published In
Acs Applied Bio Materials
Volume
5
Published Date
Start Page
1610
End Page
1623
DOI
10.1021/acsabm.2c00018

Correction to: Caregiver burden by treatment and clinical characteristics of patients with glioblastoma.

Authors
Au, TH; Willis, C; Reblin, M; Peters, KB; Nghiemphu, PL; Taylor, JW; Colman, H; Cohen, AL; Ormond, DR; Chakravarti, A; Willmarth, N; Menon, J; Ma, J; Bauer, H; Watanabe, AH; Ulrich, CM; Singh, P; Marshall, A; Korytowsky, B; Stenehjem, D; Brixner, D
MLA Citation
Au, Trang H., et al. “Correction to: Caregiver burden by treatment and clinical characteristics of patients with glioblastoma.Support Care Cancer, vol. 30, no. 2, Feb. 2022, pp. 1377–78. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s00520-021-06691-y.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1501825
PMID
34792647
Source
pubmed
Published In
Support Care Cancer
Volume
30
Published Date
Start Page
1377
End Page
1378
DOI
10.1007/s00520-021-06691-y

Research Areas:

Brain--Tumors
Cancer
Cognition
Quality of Life
Supratentorial brain tumors