Brett Phillips

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Surgery

Surgery, Plastic, Maxillofacial, and Oral Surgery
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.A. 2003

New York University

M.D. 2007

Stony Brook University, Renaissance School of Medicine

M.B.A. 2011

State University of New York, Stony Brook

General Surgery Resident, Surgery

Stony Brook University, Renaissance School of Medicine

Research Fellow, Surgery

Stony Brook University, Renaissance School of Medicine

General Surgery Resident, Surgery

Stony Brook University, Renaissance School of Medicine

Plastic Surgery Resident, Surgery

Duke University School of Medicine

Microvascular Reconstructive Surgery, Surgery

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Grants:

A Multi-institutional Randomized Controlled Trial to Determine the Optimal Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Tissue Expander-based Breast Reconstruction

Awarded By
The Plastic Surgery Foundation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Single Arm, Prospective, Open Label, Single Center Study to Evaluate the SPY PHI Fluorescence Imaging Assessment Software and Determine the Effectiveness of Intraoperative Perfusion Assessment and Identification of Viable and Non-Viable Tissue duri

Awarded By
Stryker Corporation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

The Influence of Topical Vasodilator-Induced Pharmacologic Delay on Cutaneous Flap Viability and Vascular Remodeling.

BACKGROUND: Surgical delay is a well-described technique to improve survival of random and pedicled cutaneous flaps. The aim of this study was to test the topical agents minoxidil and iloprost as agents of pharmacologic delay to induce vascular remodeling and decrease overall flap necrosis as an alternative to surgical delay. METHODS: Seven groups were studied (n = 8 in each group), including the following: vehicle, iloprost, or minoxidil before treatment only; vehicle, iloprost, or minoxidil before and after treatment; and a standard surgical delay group as a positive control. Surgical flaps (caudally based modified McFarlane myocutaneous skin flaps) were elevated after 14 days of pretreatment, reinset isotopically, and observed at various time points until postoperative day 7. Gross viability, histology, Doppler blood flow, perfusion imaging, tissue oxygenation measurement, and vascular casting were performed for analysis. RESULTS: Pharmacologic delay with preoperative application of topical minoxidil or iloprost was found to have comparable flap viability when compared to surgical delay. Significantly increased viability in all treatment groups was observed when compared with vehicle. Continued postoperative treatment with topical agents had no effect on flap viability. The mechanism of improved flap viability was inducible increases in flap blood volume and perfusion rather than the acute vasodilatory effects of the topical agents or decreased flap hypoxia. CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative topical application of the vasodilators minoxidil or iloprost improved flap viability comparably to surgical delay. Noninvasive pharmacologic delay may reduce postoperative complications without the need for an additional operation. CLINICAL RELEVANCE STATEMENT: Preoperative use of topical vasodilators may lead to improved flap viability without the need for a surgical delay procedure. This study may inform future clinical trials examining utility of preoperative topical vasodilators in flap surgery.
Authors
Wu, ZJ; Ibrahim, MM; Sergesketter, AR; Schweller, RM; Phillips, BT; Klitzman, B
MLA Citation
Wu, Zi Jun, et al. “The Influence of Topical Vasodilator-Induced Pharmacologic Delay on Cutaneous Flap Viability and Vascular Remodeling.Plast Reconstr Surg, vol. 149, no. 3, Mar. 2022, pp. 629–37. Pubmed, doi:10.1097/PRS.0000000000008829.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1506958
PMID
35041631
Source
pubmed
Published In
Plast Reconstr Surg
Volume
149
Published Date
Start Page
629
End Page
637
DOI
10.1097/PRS.0000000000008829

Spotlight in Plastic Surgery: July 2020.

Authors
Phillips, BT; Brown, S; Ha, AY; Janes, LE; Malik, M; Massand, S; Ramly, EP; Saha, S; Serebrakian, AT; Tumkur, D; Gosain, AK
MLA Citation
Phillips, Brett T., et al. “Spotlight in Plastic Surgery: July 2020.Plast Reconstr Surg, vol. 146, no. 1, July 2020, pp. 209–12. Pubmed, doi:10.1097/PRS.0000000000006972.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1519598
PMID
34870400
Source
pubmed
Published In
Plast Reconstr Surg
Volume
146
Published Date
Start Page
209
End Page
212
DOI
10.1097/PRS.0000000000006972

Vein Grafts in Free Flap Reconstruction: Review of Indications and Institutional Pearls.

SUMMARY: Vein grafts enable soft-tissue reconstruction in cases of insufficient pedicle length, a lack of nearby recipient vessels, and a wide zone of injury caused by trauma or radiation therapy. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of vein grafts in free flap reconstruction focusing on the timing of arteriovenous loops, complications, and surgical technique. Vein graft indications, types of vein grafts, and location-specific considerations are also reviewed. Three reconstructive microsurgeons at high-volume centers were asked to offer institutional pearls on the order of anastomosis, selection of donor veins, and timing of arteriovenous loops. In terms of gap length, vessel gaps less than 10 cm may be reconstructed with an interposition or transposition vein graft. For longer gaps, surgeons should consider the use of arteriovenous loops, transposition arteriovenous loops, or flow-through flaps. Both one and two-stage arteriovenous loops are used, depending on patient comorbidities, potential exposure of critical structures, and surgeon preference. Although one-stage arteriovenous loops expedite the reconstructive process, two-stage arteriovenous loops require shorter operations and help identify patients at risk of flap failure. Although whether the use of vein grafts increases flap failure rates is controversial, complications are highest in lower extremity reconstruction, cases of a prolonged interval between stages in two-stage arteriovenous loops, and unplanned vein grafts.
Authors
Langdell, HC; Shammas, RL; Atia, A; Chang, EI; Matros, E; Phillips, BT
MLA Citation
Langdell, Hannah C., et al. “Vein Grafts in Free Flap Reconstruction: Review of Indications and Institutional Pearls.Plast Reconstr Surg, vol. 149, no. 3, Mar. 2022, pp. 742–49. Pubmed, doi:10.1097/PRS.0000000000008856.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1512029
PMID
35196696
Source
pubmed
Published In
Plast Reconstr Surg
Volume
149
Published Date
Start Page
742
End Page
749
DOI
10.1097/PRS.0000000000008856

Spotlight in Plastic Surgery: January 2022.

Authors
Phillips, BT; Boczar, D; Boyd, CJ; Escandón, JM; Halani, SH; Karamanos, E; Lu, KB; Lupon, E; Mazurek, MJ; Sergesketter, AR; Shah, HR; Singh, A; Gosain, AK
MLA Citation
Phillips, Brett T., et al. “Spotlight in Plastic Surgery: January 2022.Plast Reconstr Surg, vol. 149, no. 1, Jan. 2022, pp. 283–86. Pubmed, doi:10.1097/PRS.0000000000008694.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1502692
PMID
34851863
Source
pubmed
Published In
Plast Reconstr Surg
Volume
149
Published Date
Start Page
283
End Page
286
DOI
10.1097/PRS.0000000000008694

Leadership and Advanced Degrees: Evaluating the Association Between Dual Degrees and Leadership Roles in Academic Plastic Surgery.

BACKGROUND: There are increasingly prevalent formal educational programs for physicians who seek to be better trained to advance their fields. Although higher education and advanced degrees are not necessarily linked to leadership, we hypothesize that leaders in plastic surgery commonly have dual degrees. We sought to evaluate the prevalence of and association between additional advanced degrees in academic plastic surgery and plastic surgery leadership. METHODS: Plastic surgery faculty from 96 academic training programs and all executive committee and board of directors' members from national, regional, and local plastic surgery societies were evaluated. Surgeons' institutional online profile pages, personal web pages, societal websites, and LinkedIn profiles were all evaluated for current/past leadership roles, as well as for advanced degree. Odds ratios (ORs) were used to determine if the presence of extra degrees increased their likelihood of leadership roles. RESULTS: A total of 1036 plastic surgeons were evaluated. Sixteen percent of academic faculty have a dual degree. Furthermore, 25.5% of plastic surgeons holding formal academic leadership roles have a dual degree (OR, 2.15; P = 0.043), as do 34.4% of those serving on the executive committee or board of directors in national plastic surgery societies (OR, 2.23; P = 0.026) and 29.2% of those serving in local/regional societal leadership roles (OR, 1.96; P = 0.043). Among all dual degrees, Masters in Business Administration has the highest association with leadership roles (OR, 3.45; P = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS: Academic plastic surgeons with dual degrees are approximately twice as likely to hold a formal academic or societal leadership role. Additional studies are needed to determine if causative relationships exist.
Authors
Pyfer, BJ; Hernandez, JA; Glener, AD; Cason, RW; Levinson, H; Phillips, BT
MLA Citation
Pyfer, Bryan J., et al. “Leadership and Advanced Degrees: Evaluating the Association Between Dual Degrees and Leadership Roles in Academic Plastic Surgery.Ann Plast Surg, vol. 88, no. 1, Jan. 2022, pp. 118–21. Pubmed, doi:10.1097/SAP.0000000000003029.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1504799
PMID
34928245
Source
pubmed
Published In
Ann Plast Surg
Volume
88
Published Date
Start Page
118
End Page
121
DOI
10.1097/SAP.0000000000003029