Brett Phillips

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Surgery

Surgery, Plastic, Maxillofacial, and Oral Surgery
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.A. 2003

New York University

M.D. 2007

Stony Brook University, Renaissance School of Medicine

M.B.A. 2011

State University of New York, Stony Brook

General Surgery Resident, Surgery

Stony Brook University, Renaissance School of Medicine

Research Fellow, Surgery

Stony Brook University, Renaissance School of Medicine

General Surgery Resident, Surgery

Stony Brook University, Renaissance School of Medicine

Plastic Surgery Resident, Surgery

Duke University School of Medicine

Microvascular Reconstructive Surgery, Surgery

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Grants:

A Multi-institutional Randomized Controlled Trial to Determine the Optimal Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Tissue Expander-based Breast Reconstruction

Administered By
Surgery, Plastic, Maxillofacial, and Oral Surgery
Awarded By
The Plastic Surgery Foundation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Single Arm, Prospective, Open Label, Single Center Study to Evaluate the SPY PHI Fluorescence Imaging Assessment Software and Determine the Effectiveness of Intraoperative Perfusion Assessment and Identification of Viable and Non-Viable Tissue duri

Administered By
Surgery, Plastic, Maxillofacial, and Oral Surgery
Awarded By
Stryker Corporation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Spotlight in Plastic Surgery: April 2021.

Authors
Phillips, BT; Buller, MJ; Dean, RA; Gasteratos, K; Gfrerer, L; Karadsheh, MJ; O'Farrill, A; Powers, JM; Rifkin, WJ; Sun, AH; Gosain, AK
MLA Citation
Phillips, Brett T., et al. “Spotlight in Plastic Surgery: April 2021.Plast Reconstr Surg, vol. 147, no. 4, Apr. 2021, pp. 1031–33. Pubmed, doi:10.1097/PRS.0000000000007803.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1486175
PMID
33761504
Source
pubmed
Published In
Plast Reconstr Surg
Volume
147
Published Date
Start Page
1031
End Page
1033
DOI
10.1097/PRS.0000000000007803

Location, Location, Location: The Geographic Impact of Medical School on the Plastic Surgery Match.

Background: This resident application cycle posed academic leadership and applicants with an unprecedented challenge: how to virtually match applicants to mutually beneficial programs. The authors sought to refer to previous years' data, specifically geographic trends, to better inform both program directors and applicants. The authors hypothesized that geography, as it pertains to the transition from medical school to residency, impacts match patterns. Methods: The study was designed as a cross-sectional analysis including all current integrated plastic surgery residents. The independent websites of all accredited integrated plastic surgery programs were then queried for the desired demographic resident information. Additionally, as an illustrative endpoint, geospatial heat maps were generated to better understand geographic trends. Results: All (n = 78) integrated plastic surgery programs and 953 residents were included in the study. Nearly half (47.2%) of current residents remain in the same geographic region in which they obtained their medical degree, with 26% and 17% remaining in the same state and institution, respectively. Students within all regions (North, South, Midwest, West) were more likely to stay within that region for residency (OR 2.59, 2.39, 2.09, 3.80, respectively). Students attending medical schools with affiliated integrated plastic surgery residencies have matched to programs with significantly higher Doximity rankings (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Matched integrated plastic surgery applicants are more likely to continue their training at institutions in closer geographic proximity to their medical schools. Students graduating from medical schools without affiliated integrated plastic surgery programs appear to be at a disadvantage during the match process.
Authors
Glener, AD; Lebhar, M; Hernandez, JA; Sergesketter, AR; Shammas, RL; Cason, RW; Biswas, S; Phillips, BT
MLA Citation
Glener, Adam D., et al. “Location, Location, Location: The Geographic Impact of Medical School on the Plastic Surgery Match.Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open, vol. 9, no. 4, Apr. 2021, p. e3549. Pubmed, doi:10.1097/GOX.0000000000003549.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1480611
PMID
33889475
Source
pubmed
Published In
Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Global Open
Volume
9
Published Date
Start Page
e3549
DOI
10.1097/GOX.0000000000003549

What Does It Take to Become an Academic Plastic Surgeon in Canada: Hiring Trends Over the Last 50 Years

Objective: Academic plastic surgery positions have become highly competitive secondary to delayed retirement, stagnant hospital funding, and an increasing number of plastic surgery graduates. Little information is available to help residents navigate this challenging landscape. Our objectives were to evaluate the training backgrounds of all Canadian academic plastic surgeons and to develop recommendations for residents interested in an academic career. Methods: All Canadian academic plastic surgeons were included. Training histories were obtained from institutions’ websites. Surgeons were subsequently emailed to confirm this information and complete missing details. Multivariate regressions were designed to analyze the effect of gender and FRCSC year on graduate and fellowship training and time to first academic position. Results: Training information was available for 196 surgeons (22% female), with a 56% email response rate; 91% of surgeons completed residency in Canada; 94% completed fellowship training, while 43% held graduate degrees; 74% were employed where they previously trained. Female gender significantly lengthened the time from graduation to first academic job, despite equal qualification. Younger surgeons were more likely to hold graduate degrees (P <.01). Conclusions: We identified objective data that correlate with being hired at an academic centre, including training at the same institution, obtaining a graduate degree during residency, and pursuing fellowship training. In addition, we demonstrated that women take significantly longer to acquire academic positions (P <.01), despite equal qualification. Trainees should consider these patterns when planning their careers. Future research should explore gender-based discrepancies in hiring practices.
Authors
Copeland, AE; Axelrod, DE; Wong, CR; Malone, JL; Gallo, L; Avram, R; Phillips, BT; Coroneos, CJ
MLA Citation
Copeland, A. E., et al. “What Does It Take to Become an Academic Plastic Surgeon in Canada: Hiring Trends Over the Last 50 Years.” Plastic Surgery, Jan. 2021. Scopus, doi:10.1177/22925503211011974.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1483426
Source
scopus
Published In
Plastic Surgery (Oakville, Ont.)
Published Date
DOI
10.1177/22925503211011974

Spotlight in Plastic Surgery: January 2021.

Authors
Phillips, BT; Abtahi, AR; Azoury, SC; Brito, ÍM; Cohen, JM; Goodreau, AM; Kamel, GN; Keyes, MS; Safran, T; Gosain, AK
MLA Citation
Phillips, Brett T., et al. “Spotlight in Plastic Surgery: January 2021.Plast Reconstr Surg, vol. 147, no. 1, Jan. 2021, pp. 264–66. Pubmed, doi:10.1097/PRS.0000000000007538.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1486176
PMID
33370078
Source
pubmed
Published In
Plast Reconstr Surg
Volume
147
Published Date
Start Page
264
End Page
266
DOI
10.1097/PRS.0000000000007538

Correction to: Dissatisfaction After Post-Mastectomy Breast Reconstruction: A Mixed-Methods Study.

Authors
Shammas, RL; Fish, LJ; Sergesketter, AR; Offodile, AC; Phillips, BT; Oshima, S; Lee, CN; Hollenbeck, ST; Greenup, RA
MLA Citation
Shammas, Ronnie L., et al. “Correction to: Dissatisfaction After Post-Mastectomy Breast Reconstruction: A Mixed-Methods Study.Annals of Surgical Oncology, Sept. 2021. Epmc, doi:10.1245/s10434-021-10796-3.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1496634
PMID
34514524
Source
epmc
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Published Date
DOI
10.1245/s10434-021-10796-3