Laura Porter

Overview:

My research focuses on developing and evaluating behavioral interventions to help patients and their family members cope with the symptoms and psychological demands associated with chronic and life-limiting illness.

Positions:

Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
School of Medicine

Professor in the School of Nursing

School of Nursing
School of Nursing

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 1996

State University of New York at Stony Brook

Grants:

Feasibility of a Couple-based Intervention for Parents of Children with Cancer

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Caregiver-Assisted Pain Coping Skills Training for Dementia

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Yoga-based Symptom Management for Metastatic Breast Cancer

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Coping Skills Training for Spinal Cord Stimulator Patients

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Partner-Assisted Emotional Disclosure for GI Cancer

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Greater mindfulness associated with lower pain, fatigue, and psychological distress in women with metastatic breast cancer.

OBJECTIVE: Women with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) report high levels of disease-related symptoms including pain, fatigue, psychological distress, and sleep disturbance. Mindfulness may be particularly relevant to women with MBC given the high symptom burden and psychological toll of this disease; however, the topic is understudied among this patient population. Therefore, we aimed to test the associations between mindfulness and patient-reported symptoms among a sample of women with MBC. METHODS: Sixty-four women with MBC completed baseline questionnaires of mindfulness (Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire-Short Form [FFMQ-SF]) and symptoms of pain severity and interference, fatigue, psychological distress, and sleep disturbance as part of a randomized controlled trial of a Mindful Yoga intervention. Correlational analyses of data collected at baseline tested associations between the five mindfulness facets (observing, describing, acting with awareness, nonjudging, and nonreactivity) and patient-reported measures of symptoms. RESULTS: Overall, higher mindfulness was associated with lower symptom levels including lower pain severity, pain interference, fatigue, anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbance. However, degree of association varied by mindfulness facet. Nonreactivity, nonjudging, and describing showed the most frequent associations and largest effect sizes across symptoms, while observing showed the least frequent associations and lowest effect sizes. CONCLUSIONS: Mindfulness-and in particular nonreactivity, nonjudging, and describing-may be a personal resource for women with MBC in coping with complex symptoms of this life-threatening illness. Findings are discussed relative to their implications for interventions aimed at increasing mindfulness in this vulnerable population.
Authors
Zimmaro, LA; Carson, JW; Olsen, MK; Sanders, LL; Keefe, FJ; Porter, LS
MLA Citation
Zimmaro, Lauren A., et al. “Greater mindfulness associated with lower pain, fatigue, and psychological distress in women with metastatic breast cancer..” Psychooncology, 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/pon.5223.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1319155
PMID
31509614
Source
pubmed
Published In
Psychooncology
Published Date
DOI
10.1002/pon.5223

TRAJECTORY OF RELATIONSHIP SATISFACTION ACROSS FOURTEEN DAYS: A SMARTPHONE-BASED ECOLOGICAL MOMENTARY ASSESSMENT STUDY

Authors
Hagan, R; Porter, LS; Todd, M; Ghosh, N; Randall, A; Langer, S
MLA Citation
Hagan, Rachel, et al. “TRAJECTORY OF RELATIONSHIP SATISFACTION ACROSS FOURTEEN DAYS: A SMARTPHONE-BASED ECOLOGICAL MOMENTARY ASSESSMENT STUDY.” Annals of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 53, OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC, 2019, pp. S585–S585.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1398584
Source
wos
Published In
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume
53
Published Date
Start Page
S585
End Page
S585

COUPLE COMMUNICATION IN CANCER: A COMPARISON OF GLOBAL AND ECOLOGICAL MOMENTARY ASSESSMENT REPORTS

Authors
Porter, LS; Todd, M; Keefe, FJ; Strauman, T; Baucom, D; Bricker, JB; Burns, J; Ghosh, N; Puleo, B; Langer, S
MLA Citation
Porter, Laura S., et al. “COUPLE COMMUNICATION IN CANCER: A COMPARISON OF GLOBAL AND ECOLOGICAL MOMENTARY ASSESSMENT REPORTS.” Annals of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 53, OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC, 2019, pp. S268–S268.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1398210
Source
wos
Published In
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume
53
Published Date
Start Page
S268
End Page
S268

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT WRITING GRANTS: TIPS AND TECHNIQUES FROM EXPERTS

Authors
Harper, F; Sly, J; Traeger, L; Quintiliani, LM; Vadaparampil, ST; Andrykowski, M; Porter, LS
MLA Citation
Harper, Felicity, et al. “WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT WRITING GRANTS: TIPS AND TECHNIQUES FROM EXPERTS.” Annals of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 53, OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC, 2019, pp. S1–S1.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1398582
Source
wos
Published In
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume
53
Published Date
Start Page
S1
End Page
S1

DEVELOPING A VIDEO INTERVENTION TO ENHANCE BREAST CANCER PATIENTS' CLINICAL COMMUNICATION ABOUT SEXUAL HEALTH

Authors
Reese, JB; Beach, MC; Sorice, K; Daly, MB; Porter, LS; Lepore, SJ
MLA Citation
Reese, Jennifer B., et al. “DEVELOPING A VIDEO INTERVENTION TO ENHANCE BREAST CANCER PATIENTS' CLINICAL COMMUNICATION ABOUT SEXUAL HEALTH.” Annals of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 53, OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC, 2019, pp. S520–S520.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1398583
Source
wos
Published In
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume
53
Published Date
Start Page
S520
End Page
S520