Katherine Ramos

Positions:

Assistant Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
School of Medicine

Assistant Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Geriatrics
School of Medicine

Senior Fellow in the Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development

Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 2015

University of Houston

Advanced Fellowship Program in Geriatrics, Geriatrics

Durham Veterans Administration Medical Center

Grants:

Couple Communication in Cancer: A Multi-method Examination

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
Awarded By
Arizona State University
Role
Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Resilience Measurement, Prediction, and its Role in Older Adults with Late Stage Lung Cancer

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
Awarded By
Wake Forest University School Of Medicine
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN COMMUNICATION AND EMOTIONAL CO-REGULATION (FUNDAMENTAL FREQUENCY) IN COUPLES COPING WITH CANCER

Authors
Ramos, K; Weber, D; Fischer, M; Ghosh, N; Langer, SL; Todd, M; Baucom, DH; Porter, LS
MLA Citation
Ramos, Katherine, et al. “ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN COMMUNICATION AND EMOTIONAL CO-REGULATION (FUNDAMENTAL FREQUENCY) IN COUPLES COPING WITH CANCER.” Annals of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 54, 2020, pp. S142–S142.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1452287
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume
54
Published Date
Start Page
S142
End Page
S142

ATTACHMENT, COMMUNICATION, AND PHYSICAL WELL-BEING AMONG COUPLES COPING WITH CANCER

Authors
Ramos, K; Langer, S; Todd, M; Romano, JM; Ghosh, N; Keefe, FJ; Baucom, DH; Syrjala, KL; Porter, LS
MLA Citation
Ramos, Katherine, et al. “ATTACHMENT, COMMUNICATION, AND PHYSICAL WELL-BEING AMONG COUPLES COPING WITH CANCER.” Annals of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 54, 2020, pp. S18–S18.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1452381
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume
54
Published Date
Start Page
S18
End Page
S18

COUPLE COMMUNICATION IN CANCER: NOVEL APPROACHES TO EXAMINING PROCESSES AND MECHANISMS

Authors
Porter, LS; Langer, S; Ramos, K; Romano, JM; Revenson, TA
MLA Citation
Porter, Laura S., et al. “COUPLE COMMUNICATION IN CANCER: NOVEL APPROACHES TO EXAMINING PROCESSES AND MECHANISMS.” Annals of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 54, 2020, pp. S141–S141.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1452554
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume
54
Published Date
Start Page
S141
End Page
S141

Enhancing meaning in the face of advanced cancer and pain: Qualitative evaluation of a meaning-centered psychosocial pain management intervention.

OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to obtain patient evaluations of the content, structure, and delivery modality of Meaning-Centered Pain Coping Skills Training (MCPC), a novel psychosocial intervention for patients with advanced cancer and pain. MCPC aims to help patients connect with valued sources of meaning in their lives (e.g., family relationships), while providing training in evidence-based cognitive and behavioral skills (e.g., guided imagery) to reduce pain. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 patients with stage IV solid tumor cancers and persistent pain. Transcripts were analyzed using methods from applied thematic analysis. RESULTS: When evaluating MCPC's educational information and skills training descriptions, participants described ways in which this content resonated with their experience. Many coped with their pain and poor prognosis by relying on frameworks that provided them with a sense of meaning, often involving their personally held religious or spiritual beliefs. They also expressed a need for learning ways to cope with pain in addition to taking medication. A few participants offered helpful suggestions for refining MCPC's content, such as addressing common co-occurring symptoms of sleep disturbance and fatigue. Concerning MCPC's structure and delivery modality, most participants preferred that sessions include their family caregiver and described remote delivery (i.e., telephone or videoconference) as being more feasible than attending in-person sessions. SIGNIFICANCE OF RESULTS: Participants were interested in an intervention that concurrently focuses on learning pain coping skills and enhancing a sense of meaning. Using remote delivery modalities may reduce access barriers (e.g., travel) that would otherwise prevent many patients from utilizing psychosocial services.
Authors
MLA Citation
Winger, Joseph G., et al. “Enhancing meaning in the face of advanced cancer and pain: Qualitative evaluation of a meaning-centered psychosocial pain management intervention.Palliat Support Care, vol. 18, no. 3, June 2020, pp. 263–70. Pubmed, doi:10.1017/S1478951520000115.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1434071
PMID
32115006
Source
pubmed
Published In
Palliat Support Care
Volume
18
Published Date
Start Page
263
End Page
270
DOI
10.1017/S1478951520000115

Anxiety Disorders in Late Life.

Anxiety disorders in later life are some of the most significant mental health problems affecting older adults. Prevalence estimates of anxiety disorders in late life vary considerably based on multiple methodological issues. Current diagnostic criteria may not adequately capture the nature and experience of anxiety in older people, particularly those in ethnic and racial minority groups. This article reviews late-life anxiety disorders. Pharmacologic and psychotherapy approaches to treat late-life anxiety are reviewed, including a summary of current innovations in clinical care across settings, treatment models, and treatment delivery.
Authors
Ramos, K; Stanley, MA
MLA Citation
Ramos, Katherine, and Melinda A. Stanley. “Anxiety Disorders in Late Life.Clin Geriatr Med, vol. 36, no. 2, May 2020, pp. 237–46. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.cger.2019.11.005.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1436081
PMID
32222299
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clin Geriatr Med
Volume
36
Published Date
Start Page
237
End Page
246
DOI
10.1016/j.cger.2019.11.005