Dina Randazzo

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery

Neurosurgery, Neuro-Oncology
School of Medicine

Assistant Professor in Neurology

Neurology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

D.O. 2009

Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine

Grants:

Phase 2 study of convection-enhanced delivery of MDNA55 in adults with glioblastoma first recurrence or progression

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

A cross sectional analysis from a single institution's experience of psychosocial distress and health-related quality of life in the primary brain tumor population.

Primary brain tumor patients experience high levels of distress. The purpose of this cross-sectional, retrospective study is to evaluate the level and different sources of psychosocial distress and how these pertain to health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The Primary and Recurrent Glioma registry at Duke's The Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center was queried retrospectively for demographic and clinical information on patients seen between December 2013 and February 2014. Data also included the National Comprehensive Cancer Network's Distress Thermometer (NCCN-DT), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Brain Cancer (FACT-Br), and Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy- Fatigue (FACIT-F). 829 subjects completed questionnaires. 54% were male; 96% completed the NCCN-DT; 33.3% had a DT score ≥4 (moderate/severe distress). Women reported DT ≥ 4 more often than men (38.6 vs 29.0%; p = 0.005). Patients within 1 year of diagnosis reported DT ≥ 4 more often than those 1+ years after diagnosis (38.8 vs 30.9%; p = 0.034). 73.0% reported physical problems; the most frequent being fatigue (43.2%) and memory/concentration (40.9%). 42.0% complained of emotional problems with worry (29.4%) and nervousness (22.4%) being the most common. Patients who reported at least one practical, family, emotional or physical problem had significantly lower HRQoL scores (p < 0.001). Primary brain tumor patients experience memory dysfunction, fatigue, nervousness, worry, and financial concerns, which have a negative effect on the patient's HRQoL. By identifying and addressing these stressors, it may be possible to improve patient HRQoL.
Authors
Randazzo, DM; McSherry, F; Herndon, JE; Affronti, ML; Lipp, ES; Flahiff, C; Miller, E; Woodring, S; Freeman, M; Healy, P; Minchew, J; Boulton, S; Desjardins, A; Vlahovic, G; Friedman, HS; Keir, S; Peters, KB
MLA Citation
Randazzo, Dina M., et al. “A cross sectional analysis from a single institution's experience of psychosocial distress and health-related quality of life in the primary brain tumor population..” J Neurooncol, vol. 134, no. 2, Sept. 2017, pp. 363–69. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s11060-017-2535-4.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1264108
PMID
28669010
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Neurooncol
Volume
134
Published Date
Start Page
363
End Page
369
DOI
10.1007/s11060-017-2535-4

Complementary and integrative health interventions and their association with health-related quality of life in the primary brain tumor population.

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Little is known about complementary and integrative health intervention usage in the primary brain tumor population. We aimed to identify the percentage of patients using these practices and explore the impact on quality of life. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Clinical records from patients seen in clinic between December 16, 2013 and February 28, 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. The questionnaires used were a modified version of the International Complementary and Alternative Medicine Questionnaire, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy- Brain Cancer and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy- Fatigue. RESULTS: 76% of patients utilized a complementary and integrative health modality. The most frequently reported modalities used were vitamins, massage, and spiritual healing, prayer, diet and meditation. CONCLUSION: These results confirm the usage of complementary and integrative health practices within the primary brain tumor population; however, there was no evidence of association between use and quality of life.
Authors
Randazzo, DM; McSherry, F; Herndon, JE; Affronti, ML; Lipp, ES; Flahiff, C; Miller, E; Woodring, S; Boulton, S; Desjardins, A; Ashley, DM; Friedman, HS; Peters, KB
MLA Citation
Randazzo, Dina M., et al. “Complementary and integrative health interventions and their association with health-related quality of life in the primary brain tumor population..” Complement Ther Clin Pract, vol. 36, Aug. 2019, pp. 43–48. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.ctcp.2019.05.002.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1387989
PMID
31383442
Source
pubmed
Published In
Complement Ther Clin Pract
Volume
36
Published Date
Start Page
43
End Page
48
DOI
10.1016/j.ctcp.2019.05.002