Shelby Reed

Overview:

Shelby Reed, PhD, RPh is Professor in Population Health Sciences and Medicine at Duke University and Director of the Preference Evaluation Research (PrefER) Group at the Duke Clinical Research Institute.  She also is core faculty and serves on the executive committee at the Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy. Dr. Reed has 20 years of experience leading multidisciplinary health outcomes research studies. Dr. Reed has extensive expertise in designing and conducting trial-based and model-based cost-effectiveness analyses of diagnostics, drugs and patient-centered interventions. In evaluating health policy issues, she has developed computer models to evaluate the economic impact of trends in clinical trial design, changes in reimbursement policies, a new financing scheme to spur drug development for ultra-rare conditions, and the societal value of alternative approaches to identifying drug safety problems. Over the last several years, her research has increasingly focused on stated-preference studies to evaluate benefit-risk tradeoffs, patient-centered value, and their application in comparative effectiveness research and clinical decision making.  Dr. Reed earned pharmacy and doctoral degrees from the University of Maryland and completed her training in the Pharmaceutical Outcomes Research and Policy Program at the University of Washington. She serves on editorial advisory boards for Value in Health and Health Services Research.  She served as President of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) in 2017-2018.

Shelby Reed, PhD, RPh is Professor in Population Health Sciences and Medicine at Duke University and Director of the Preference Evaluation Research (PrefER) Group at the Duke Clinical Research Institute.  She also is core faculty and serves on the executive committee at the Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy. Dr. Reed has 20 years of experience leading multidisciplinary health outcomes research studies. Dr. Reed has extensive expertise in designing and conducting trial-based and model-based cost-effectiveness analyses of diagnostics, drugs and patient-centered interventions. In evaluating health policy issues, she has developed computer models to evaluate the economic impact of trends in clinical trial design, changes in reimbursement policies, a new financing scheme to spur drug development for ultra-rare conditions, and the societal value of alternative approaches to identifying drug safety problems. Over the last several years, her research has increasingly focused on stated-preference studies to evaluate benefit-risk tradeoffs, patient-centered value, and their application in comparative effectiveness research and clinical decision making.  Dr. Reed earned pharmacy and doctoral degrees from the University of Maryland and completed her training in the Pharmaceutical Outcomes Research and Policy Program at the University of Washington. She serves on editorial advisory boards for Value in Health and Health Services Research.  She served as President of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) in 2017-2018. she is currently Chair of ISPOR's Health Science Policy Council.

 

Areas of expertise: Health Economics, Health Measurement, Stated Preference Research, Health Policy, and Health Services Research

Positions:

Professor in Population Health Sciences

Population Health Sciences
School of Medicine

Professor in Medicine

Medicine, General Internal Medicine
School of Medicine

Associate of the Duke Initiative for Science & Society

Duke Science & Society
Institutes and Provost's Academic Units

Member in the Duke Clinical Research Institute

Duke Clinical Research Institute
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 1998

University of Maryland, College Park

Grants:

Tissue and Data Acquisition Activity for the Study of Gynecologic Disease

Administered By
Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gynecologic Oncology
Role
Collaborator
Start Date
End Date

Multi-factorial Intervention to Slow Progression of Diabetic Kidney Disease

Administered By
Basic Science Departments
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Integrated Population Program for Diabetic Kidney Disease

Administered By
Basic Science Departments
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Economist
Start Date
End Date

Take Control of Your Blood Pressure (TCYB) Study

Administered By
Medicine, General Internal Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Economist
Start Date
End Date

Thyrogen Utilization Patterns in the Treatment of Thyroid Cancer

Administered By
Duke Clinical Research Institute
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Within-Trial Evaluation of Medical Resources, Costs, and Quality of Life Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Participating in the Exenatide Study of Cardiovascular Event Lowering (EXSCEL).

OBJECTIVE: To compare medical resource use, costs, and health utilities for 14,752 patients with type 2 diabetes who were randomized to once-weekly exenatide (EQW) or placebo in addition to usual diabetes care in the Exenatide Study of Cardiovascular Event Lowering (EXSCEL). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Medical resource use data and responses to the EuroQol 5-Dimension (EQ-5D) instrument were collected at baseline and throughout the trial. Medical resources and medications were assigned values by using U.S. Medicare payments and wholesale acquisition costs, respectively. Secondary analyses used English costs. RESULTS: Patients were followed for an average of 3.3 years, during which time those randomized to EQW experienced 0.41 fewer inpatient days (7.05 vs. 7.46 days; relative rate ratio 0.91; P = 0.05). Rates of outpatient medical visits were similar, as were total inpatient and outpatient costs. Mean costs for nonstudy diabetes medications over the study period were ∼$1,600 lower with EQW than with placebo (P = 0.01). Total within-study costs, excluding study medication, were lower in the EQW arm than in the placebo arm ($28,907 vs. $30,914; P ≤ 0.01). When including the estimated cost of EQW, total mean costs were significantly higher in the EQW group than in the placebo group ($42,697 vs. $30,914; P < 0.01). With English costs applied, mean total costs, including exenatide costs, were £1,670 higher in the EQW group than the placebo group (£10,874 vs. £9,204; P < 0.01). There were no significant differences in EQ-5D health utilities between arms over time. CONCLUSIONS: Medical costs were lower in the EQW arm than the placebo arm, but total costs were significantly higher once the cost of branded exenatide was incorporated.
Authors
Reed, SD; Li, Y; Dakin, HA; Becker, F; Leal, J; Gustavson, SM; Kartman, B; Wittbrodt, E; Mentz, RJ; Pagidipati, NJ; Bethel, MA; Gray, AM; Holman, RR; Hernandez, AF; EXSCEL Study Group,
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1423451
PMID
31806653
Source
pubmed
Published In
Diabetes Care
Published Date
DOI
10.2337/dc19-0950

Cytomegalovirus in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Transplantation: Impact on Costs and Clinical Outcomes Using a Preemptive Strategy.

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) results in significant morbidity and mortality following hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Establishing the cost and clinical impact is imperative to the selection of appropriate CMV preventative strategies. This is a retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients undergoing their first allogeneic HCT between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2013. Detailed clinical and institutional cost data were obtained from the start of conditioning through 1-year post-transplantation. Baseline characteristics, resource utilization, costs, and outcomes were compared between patients with and without clinically significant CMV infection (csCMVi). One hundred seventy out of 388 patients (44%) developed csCMVi within 1 year after HCT. Within the first year post-HCT, patients with csCMVi had a significantly longer transplantation-related length of stay (mean, 91.7 days versus 78.3 days; P < .0001) and more frequent and prolonged hospitalizations (mean, 2.4 versus 1.7 admissions [P < .0001]; mean, 39.1 versus 31.5 inpatient days [P = .001]) without significantly more admissions to the intensive care unit (28.2% versus 21.6%; P = .408). The use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was greater in patients with csCMVi (73.5% versus 54.1%; P = .0001), although no significant differences were demonstrated in mean platelet or red blood cell (RBC) transfusions. Total costs were also higher in patients with csCMVi (mean cost difference, $45,811; 95% CI, $26,385 to $67,544). However, the incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and selected infectious complications was not significantly different between the 2 groups. There were no significant differences in 1-year and 5-year post-transplantation overall survival (OS) or nonrelapse mortality (NRM) between those with and those without csCMVi, although relapse of underlying disease was significantly lower in the csCMVi group. Overall, our data show that allogeneic HCT recipients with csCMVi had significantly greater medical resource utilization and costs than those without csCMVi. However, clinical outcomes, including GVHD, infections, and mortality, were similar in the 2 groups. Further study is needed to determine the cost-effectiveness of CMV preventive modalities.
Authors
Saullo, JL; Li, Y; Messina, JA; Thompson, J; Dalton, T; Giri, VK; Reed, SD; Miller, R; Horwitz, ME; Alexander, BD; Sung, AD
MLA Citation
Saullo, Jennifer L., et al. “Cytomegalovirus in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Transplantation: Impact on Costs and Clinical Outcomes Using a Preemptive Strategy..” Biol Blood Marrow Transplant, Nov. 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.bbmt.2019.11.005.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1418936
PMID
31712193
Source
pubmed
Published In
Biol Blood Marrow Transplant
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.bbmt.2019.11.005

EXSCEL—Once-Weekly Exenatide Reduces Medical Resource Utilization in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Authors
REED, SHELBYD; LI, YANHONG; DAKIN, HELENA; BECKER, FRAUKE; LEAL, JOSE; GUSTAVSON, STEPHANIE; KARTMAN, BERNT; WITTBRODT, ERICT; MENTZ, ROBERTJ; PAGIDIPATI, NEHA; ANGELYN BETHEL, M; GRAY, ALASTAIRM; HOLMAN, RURYR; HERNANDEZ, ADRIANF
MLA Citation
REED, S. H. E. L. B. Y. D., et al. “EXSCEL—Once-Weekly Exenatide Reduces Medical Resource Utilization in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.” Diabetes, vol. 67, no. Supplement 1, American Diabetes Association, 2018, pp. 1319-P. Crossref, doi:10.2337/db18-1319-p.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1412830
Source
crossref
Published In
Diabetes
Volume
67
Published Date
Start Page
1319
End Page
P
DOI
10.2337/db18-1319-p

Patients Accept Mortality Risk for Improvements in Physical Functioning in Secondary Mitral Regurgitation

Authors
Reed, SD; Fairchild, AO; Johnson, FR; Gonzalez, JM; Mentz, RJ; Krucoff, MW; Vemulapalli, S
MLA Citation
Reed, Shelby D., et al. “Patients Accept Mortality Risk for Improvements in Physical Functioning in Secondary Mitral Regurgitation.” Journal of Cardiac Failure, vol. 25, no. 8, Elsevier BV, 2019, pp. S149–S149. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.cardfail.2019.07.430.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1409842
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal of Cardiac Failure
Volume
25
Published Date
Start Page
S149
End Page
S149
DOI
10.1016/j.cardfail.2019.07.430

Patient preferences for maintenance PARP therapy in ovarian cancer treatment.

Authors
Havrilesky, LJ; Lim, S; Yang, J-C; Lorenzo, A; Ehrisman, JA; Secord, AA; Johnson, R; Reed, SD
MLA Citation
Havrilesky, Laura Jean, et al. “Patient preferences for maintenance PARP therapy in ovarian cancer treatment..” Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 37, no. 15_suppl, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), 2019, pp. 5558–5558. Crossref, doi:10.1200/jco.2019.37.15_suppl.5558.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1415470
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
37
Published Date
Start Page
5558
End Page
5558
DOI
10.1200/jco.2019.37.15_suppl.5558

Research Areas:

Academic Medical Centers
Alzheimer Disease
Ambulatory Care
Anemia, Sickle Cell
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Anticoagulants
Antifungal Agents
Antineoplastic Agents
Arthritis, Rheumatoid
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee
Bacterial Infections
Behavior Therapy
Biotechnology
Blood Pressure
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Blood Transfusion
Brain
Brain Ischemia
Breast Neoplasms
Candida glabrata
Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Cardiovascular Diseases
Cardiovascular Surgical Procedures
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Chemoprevention
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Chronic Disease
Clinical Trial
Clinical Trials as Topic
Cohort Studies
Commerce
Comorbidity
Comparative Effectiveness Research
Continental Population Groups
Cost Savings
Cost of Illness
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Costs
Costs and Cost Analysis
Data Collection
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Decision Making
Decision Support Techniques
Decision Trees
Dermatitis, Atopic
Device Approval
Diabetes Mellitus
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1
Diffusion of Innovation
Disease Management
Disease Progression
Disease-Free Survival
Drug Approval
Drug Costs
Drug Industry
Drug Prescriptions
Drug Therapy, Combination
Economics, Hospital
Economics, Pharmaceutical
Efficiency, Organizational
Evidence-Based Medicine
Exercise Therapy
Financial Management
Financing, Organized
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting
Fractures, Bone
Gene Expression Profiling
Government Regulation
Health Care Costs
Health Care Rationing
Health Expenditures
Health Resources
Health Services
Health Services Research
Health Status
Heart Failure
Hospital Costs
Hospital Mortality
Hospitalization
Hypertension
Inpatients
Insulin Infusion Systems
Kidney Failure, Chronic
Length of Stay
Linear Models
Lymph Node Excision
Medical Laboratory Science
Medicine
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Models, Economic
Models, Statistical
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction
Myocardial Ischemia
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
Neoplasms
Orthopedic Procedures
Osteoarthritis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Ovarian Neoplasms
Pancreatectomy
Pancreatic Neoplasms
Patient Care Management
Patient Discharge
Patient Readmission
Patient-Centered Care
Perception
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
Pharmacy
Physician's Practice Patterns
Policy Making
Polymorphism, Genetic
Practice Patterns, Physicians'
Predictive Value of Tests
Program Evaluation
Proportional Hazards Models
Prostatic Neoplasms
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Radiotherapy, Adjuvant
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Recurrence
Registries
Renal Dialysis
Research Design
Resource Allocation
Respiratory Function Tests
Risk Assessment
Risk Factors
Social Values
Socioeconomic Factors
Staphylococcal Infections
Staphylococcus aureus
Stem Cell Transplantation
Stents
Stroke
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
Surgical Procedures, Operative
Surgical Wound Infection
Surveys and Questionnaires
Terminal Care
Thyroid Neoplasms
Thyroidectomy
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left