Shelby Reed

Overview:

Shelby Reed, PhD, RPh is Professor in Population Health Sciences and Medicine at Duke University and Director of the Preference Evaluation Research (PrefER) Group at the Duke Clinical Research Institute.  She also is core faculty and serves on the executive committee at the Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy. Dr. Reed has 20 years of experience leading multidisciplinary health outcomes research studies. Dr. Reed has extensive expertise in designing and conducting trial-based and model-based cost-effectiveness analyses of diagnostics, drugs and patient-centered interventions. In evaluating health policy issues, she has developed computer models to evaluate the economic impact of trends in clinical trial design, changes in reimbursement policies, a new financing scheme to spur drug development for ultra-rare conditions, and the societal value of alternative approaches to identifying drug safety problems. Over the last several years, her research has increasingly focused on stated-preference studies to evaluate benefit-risk tradeoffs, patient-centered value, and their application in comparative effectiveness research and clinical decision making.  Dr. Reed earned pharmacy and doctoral degrees from the University of Maryland and completed her training in the Pharmaceutical Outcomes Research and Policy Program at the University of Washington. She serves on editorial advisory boards for Value in Health and Health Services Research.  She served as President of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) in 2017-2018 and is currently Chair of ISPOR's Health Science Policy Council.

 

Areas of expertise: Health Economics, Health Measurement, Stated Preference Research, Health Policy, and Health Services Research

Positions:

Professor in Population Health Sciences

Population Health Sciences
School of Medicine

Professor in Medicine

Medicine, General Internal Medicine
School of Medicine

Associate of the Duke Initiative for Science & Society

Duke Science & Society
Institutes and Provost's Academic Units

Executive Core Faculty Member, Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy

Duke - Margolis Center For Health Policy
Institutes and Provost's Academic Units

Member in the Duke Clinical Research Institute

Duke Clinical Research Institute
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 1998

University of Maryland, College Park

Grants:

Thyrogen Utilization Patterns in the Treatment of Thyroid Cancer

Administered By
Duke Clinical Research Institute
Awarded By
Genzyme Corporation
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Nationwide Utilization of Cardiac Imaging In Cancer Patients

Administered By
Duke Clinical Research Institute
Awarded By
BC Cancer Research Centre
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

IPA--Shelby Reed

Administered By
Population Health Sciences
Awarded By
Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center
Role
Research Associate
Start Date
End Date

Incentivizing Behavior Change Skills to Promote Weight Loss

Administered By
School of Nursing
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Pharmacogenetic Testing: Challenges of Clinical Integration

Administered By
Institutes and Centers
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Factors Influential in the Selection of Radiology Residents in the Post-Step 1 World: A Discrete Choice Experiment.

OBJECTIVES: Reporting of United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 results will transition from a numerical score to a pass or fail result. We sought an objective analysis to determine changes in the relative importance of resident application attributes when numerical Step 1 results are replaced. METHODS: A discrete choice experiment was designed to model radiology resident selection and determine the relative weights of various application factors when paired with a numerical or pass or fail Step 1 result. Faculty involved in resident selection at 14 US radiology programs chose between hypothetical pairs of applicant profiles between August and November 2020. A conditional logistic regression model assessed the relative weights of the attributes, and odds ratios (ORs) were calculated. RESULTS: There were 212 participants. When a numerical Step 1 score was provided, the most influential attributes were medical school (OR: 2.35, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.07-2.67), Black or Hispanic race or ethnicity (OR: 2.04, 95% CI: 1.79-2.38), and Step 1 score (OR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.69-1.95). When Step 1 was reported as pass, the applicant's medical school grew in influence (OR: 2.78, 95% CI: 2.42-3.18), and there was a significant increase in influence of Step 2 scores (OR: 1.31, 95% CI: 1.23-1.40 versus OR 1.57, 95% CI: 1.46-1.69). There was little change in the relative influence of race or ethnicity, gender, class rank, or clerkship honors. DISCUSSION: When Step 1 reporting transitions to pass or fail, medical school prestige gains outsized influence and Step 2 scores partly fill the gap left by Step 1 examination as a single metric of decisive importance in application decisions.
Authors
Maxfield, CM; Montano-Campos, JF; Chapman, T; Desser, TS; Ho, CP; Hull, NC; Kelly, HR; Kennedy, TA; Koontz, NA; Knippa, EE; McLoud, TC; Milburn, J; Mills, MK; Morgan, DE; Morgan, R; Peterson, RB; Salastekar, N; Thorpe, MP; Zarzour, JG; Reed, SD; Grimm, LJ
MLA Citation
Maxfield, Charles M., et al. “Factors Influential in the Selection of Radiology Residents in the Post-Step 1 World: A Discrete Choice Experiment.J Am Coll Radiol, vol. 18, no. 11, Nov. 2021, pp. 1572–80. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jacr.2021.07.005.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1492912
PMID
34332914
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of the American College of Radiology : Jacr
Volume
18
Published Date
Start Page
1572
End Page
1580
DOI
10.1016/j.jacr.2021.07.005

Stratified psoriasis treatment plans: why is patient preference information needed?

Authors
Gonzalez, JM; Reed, SD; Johnson, FR
MLA Citation
Gonzalez, J. M., et al. “Stratified psoriasis treatment plans: why is patient preference information needed?Br J Dermatol, vol. 185, no. 5, Nov. 2021, pp. 882–83. Pubmed, doi:10.1111/bjd.20697.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1496116
PMID
34463961
Source
pubmed
Published In
Br J Dermatol
Volume
185
Published Date
Start Page
882
End Page
883
DOI
10.1111/bjd.20697

Rehabilitation Intervention in Older Patients With Acute Heart Failure With Preserved Versus Reduced Ejection Fraction.

OBJECTIVES: This study assessed for treatment interactions by ejection fraction (EF) subgroup (≥45% [heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF); vs <45% [heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF)]). BACKGROUND: The REHAB-HF trial showed that an early multidomain rehabilitation intervention improved physical function, frailty, quality-of-life, and depression in older patients hospitalized with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). METHODS: Three-month outcomes were: Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), 6-min walk distance (6MWD), and Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ). Six-month end points included all-cause rehospitalization and death and a global rank of death, all-cause rehospitalization, and SPPB. Prespecified significance level for interaction was P ≤ 0.1. RESULTS: Among 349 total participants, 185 (53%) had HFpEF and 164 (47%) had HFrEF. Compared with HFrEF, HFpEF participants were more often women (61% vs 43%) and had significantly worse baseline physical function, frailty, quality of life, and depression. Although interaction P values for 3-month outcomes were not significant, effect sizes were larger for HFpEF vs HFrEF: SPPB +1.9 (95% CI: 1.1-2.6) vs +1.1 (95% CI: 0.3-1.9); 6MWD +40 meters (95% CI: 9 meters-72 meters) vs +27 (95% CI: -6 meters to 59 meters); KCCQ +9 (2-16) vs +6 (-2 to 14). All-cause rehospitalization rate was nominally lower with intervention in HFpEF but not HFrEF [effect size 0.83 (95% CI: 0.64-1.09) vs 0.99 (95% CI: 0.74-1.33); interaction P = 0.40]. There were significantly greater treatment benefits in HFpEF vs HFrEF for all-cause death [interaction P = 0.08; intervention rate ratio 0.63 (95% CI: 0.25-1.61) vs 2.21 (95% CI: 0.78-6.25)], and the global rank end point (interaction P = 0.098) with benefit seen in HFpEF [probability index 0.59 (95% CI: 0.50-0.68)] but not HFrEF. CONCLUSIONS: Among older patients hospitalized with ADHF, compared with HFrEF those with HFpEF had significantly worse impairments at baseline and may derive greater benefit from the intervention. (A Trial of Rehabilitation Therapy in Older Acute Heart Failure Patients [REHAB-HF]; NCT02196038).
Authors
Mentz, RJ; Whellan, DJ; Reeves, GR; Pastva, AM; Duncan, P; Upadhya, B; Nelson, MB; Chen, H; Reed, SD; Rosenberg, PB; Bertoni, AG; O'Connor, CM; Kitzman, DW
MLA Citation
Mentz, Robert J., et al. “Rehabilitation Intervention in Older Patients With Acute Heart Failure With Preserved Versus Reduced Ejection Fraction.Jacc Heart Fail, vol. 9, no. 10, Oct. 2021, pp. 747–57. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jchf.2021.05.007.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1488873
PMID
34246602
Source
pubmed
Published In
Jacc Heart Fail
Volume
9
Published Date
Start Page
747
End Page
757
DOI
10.1016/j.jchf.2021.05.007

Quantifying Value of Hope.

BACKGROUND: 'Hope' is a construct in patient-centered value frameworks, but few studies have attempted to measure the value of hope separately from treatment-related gains in quality of life and survival to support its application in economic evaluation. OBJECTIVE: To generate quantitative information on the "value of hope". METHODS: We designed a discrete-choice experiment in which treatment alternatives varied the probability of achieving 10-year survival, expected survival as the weighted sum of short-term and long-term survival, health status, and out-of-pocket cost. Two-hundred patients with cancer or history of cancer recruited by Cancer Support Community each completed 10 choice questions. We used mixed-logit and latent-class models to analyze the choice data. RESULTS: Relative to fixed survival periods of two, three or five years with 0% chance of 10-year survival, participants positively valued treatments with 5% and 10% chances of 10-year survival. However, participants negatively valued a 20% chance of 10-year survival that required an offsetting 80% chance of shorter survival. This finding was particularly strong when expected survival was two years. Compared to a 0% chance, dollar-equivalent values of 5% and 10% chances of long-term survival were $5,975 and $12,421, respectively, independent of health status or expected survival. The corresponding value for 20% versus 0% chance of long-term survival was negative. Latent-class analysis revealed 4 groups with distinct preference patterns. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings affirm positive value for hope independent of expected survival and health status. However, this finding does not universally hold in all situations nor across all groups.
Authors
Reed, SD; Yang, J-C; Gonzalez, JM; Johnson, FR
MLA Citation
Reed, Shelby D., et al. “Quantifying Value of Hope.Value Health, vol. 24, no. 10, Oct. 2021, pp. 1511–19. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jval.2021.04.1284.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1494417
PMID
34593175
Source
pubmed
Published In
Value Health
Volume
24
Published Date
Start Page
1511
End Page
1519
DOI
10.1016/j.jval.2021.04.1284

Chemoradiation treatment patterns among United States Veteran Health Administration patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer.

BACKGROUND: The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) is the largest integrated health care system in the United States (US). Among VHA patients, the rate of use of concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) among those with unresectable, stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is unknown. The objective was to report recent CCRT treatment patterns in VHA patients and identify characteristics associated with receipt of CCRT. METHODS: Using Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) Cancer Registry System data linked to VA electronic medical records, we determined rates of CCRT, sequential CRT (SCRT), radiation therapy (RT) only, chemotherapy (CT) only, and neither treatment. RESULTS: Among 4054 VHA patients who met study criteria, CCRT rates slightly increased from 44 to 50% between 2013 and 2017. Factors associated with decreased odds of CCRT receipt compared to any other treatment included increasing age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] per 10 years = 0.67; 95% CI: 0.60-0.76) and Charlson-Deyo comorbidity score (aOR = 0.94; 95% CI: 0.91-0.97). White race was associated with increased odds of CCRT receipt (aOR = 1.24; 95% CI: 1.004-1.53). In a chart review sample of 200 patients, less than half (n = 85) had a documented reason for not receiving CCRT. Among these, 29% declined treatment, and 71% did not receive CCRT due to "not being a candidate" for reasons related to frailty or lung nodules being too far apart for radiation therapy. CONCLUSIONS: CCRT rates among VHA patients with unresectable, stage III NSCLC slightly increased from 2013 to 2017; however in 2017, only half were receiving CCRT. Older patients and those with multiple comorbidities were less likely to receive CCRT and even when controlling for these factors, non-white patients were less likely to receive CCRT.
Authors
Hung, A; Lee, KM; Lynch, JA; Li, Y; Poonnen, P; Efimova, OV; Hintze, BJ; Buckingham, T; Yong, C; Seal, B; Kelley, MJ; Reed, SD
MLA Citation
Hung, Anna, et al. “Chemoradiation treatment patterns among United States Veteran Health Administration patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer.Bmc Cancer, vol. 21, no. 1, July 2021, p. 824. Pubmed, doi:10.1186/s12885-021-08577-y.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1488945
PMID
34271861
Source
pubmed
Published In
Bmc Cancer
Volume
21
Published Date
Start Page
824
DOI
10.1186/s12885-021-08577-y

Research Areas:

Academic Medical Centers
Alzheimer Disease
Ambulatory Care
Anemia, Sickle Cell
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Anticoagulants
Antifungal Agents
Antineoplastic Agents
Arthritis, Rheumatoid
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee
Bacterial Infections
Behavior Therapy
Biotechnology
Blood Pressure
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Blood Transfusion
Brain
Brain Ischemia
Breast Neoplasms
Candida glabrata
Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Cardiovascular Diseases
Cardiovascular Surgical Procedures
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Chemoprevention
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Chronic Disease
Clinical Trial
Clinical Trials as Topic
Cohort Studies
Commerce
Comorbidity
Comparative Effectiveness Research
Continental Population Groups
Cost Savings
Cost of Illness
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Costs
Costs and Cost Analysis
Data Collection
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Decision Making
Decision Support Techniques
Decision Trees
Dermatitis, Atopic
Device Approval
Diabetes Mellitus
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1
Diffusion of Innovation
Disease Management
Disease Progression
Disease-Free Survival
Drug Approval
Drug Costs
Drug Industry
Drug Prescriptions
Drug Therapy, Combination
Economics, Hospital
Economics, Pharmaceutical
Efficiency, Organizational
Evidence-Based Medicine
Exercise Therapy
Financial Management
Financing, Organized
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting
Fractures, Bone
Gene Expression Profiling
Government Regulation
Health Care Costs
Health Care Rationing
Health Expenditures
Health Resources
Health Services
Health Services Research
Health Status
Heart Failure
Hospital Costs
Hospital Mortality
Hospitalization
Hypertension
Inpatients
Insulin Infusion Systems
Kidney Failure, Chronic
Length of Stay
Linear Models
Lymph Node Excision
Medical Laboratory Science
Medicine
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Models, Economic
Models, Statistical
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction
Myocardial Ischemia
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
Neoplasms
Orthopedic Procedures
Osteoarthritis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Ovarian Neoplasms
Pancreatectomy
Pancreatic Neoplasms
Patient Care Management
Patient Discharge
Patient Readmission
Patient-Centered Care
Perception
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
Pharmacy
Physician's Practice Patterns
Policy Making
Polymorphism, Genetic
Practice Patterns, Physicians'
Predictive Value of Tests
Program Evaluation
Proportional Hazards Models
Prostatic Neoplasms
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Radiotherapy, Adjuvant
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Recurrence
Registries
Renal Dialysis
Research Design
Resource Allocation
Respiratory Function Tests
Risk Assessment
Risk Factors
Social Values
Socioeconomic Factors
Staphylococcal Infections
Staphylococcus aureus
Stem Cell Transplantation
Stents
Stroke
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
Surgical Procedures, Operative
Surgical Wound Infection
Surveys and Questionnaires
Terminal Care
Thyroid Neoplasms
Thyroidectomy
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left