David Rizzieri

Overview:

My research interests focus on the care of patients with hematologic malignancies, both with and without the use of bone marrow or stem cell transplantation. I focus my research efforts on new approaches to manipulate minimal residual disease.

Recent endeavors have included:
 

  1. Phase one trials with novel anti-cancer agents targeting aurora kinases, tyrosine kinases, mtor, VEGF, and raf/ras pathways 
  2. New monoclonal antibodies targeting tumor stroma rather than cellular antigens 
  3. Investigating new antibody targets, i.e. CD123, endoglin, or tenascin for hematologic malignancies 
  4. Aggressive therapy and transplantation for mantle cell lymphoma 
  5. Antiangiogenesis therapy for patients with NHL 
  6. Nonablative allogeneic transplantation therapy with matched or mismatched donors followed by immune modulation

Positions:

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1991

University of Rochester

Medical Resident, Medicine

Duke University

Fellow in Hematology/Oncology, Medicine

Duke University

Grants:

Mechanisms of lung injury following autologous BMT

Administered By
Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Pathological B Cells: Novel Strategies to Prevent and Treat Chronic GVHD

Administered By
Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

An Open Lavel, Multicenter, Extension Study for Subjects Who Participated in Prior Guadecitabine Clinical Studies

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Astex Therapeutics Ltd.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

An Open Label Phase IB study of PF-04449913 (Glasdegib) in Combination with Azacitidine in patients with previously untreated higher-risk myelodysplastic syndrome, acute myeloid leukemia

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Pfizer, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Multicenter, open-label treatment protocol of Gilteritinib (ASP2215) in patients with FMS-like Tyrosine Kinase 3 (FLT3) Mutated Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AMLJ) or FLT3-Mutated AML in Complete Remission (CR) with Mini ResiduaL

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Astellas Pharma Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

A phase 1 study of the pan-bromodomain and extraterminal inhibitor mivebresib (ABBV-075) alone or in combination with venetoclax in patients with relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia.

BACKGROUND: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogenous malignancy driven by genetic and epigenetic factors. Inhibition of bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) proteins, epigenetic readers that play pivotal roles in the regulation of genes relevant to cancer pathogenesis, constitutes a novel AML treatment approach. METHODS: In this first-in-human study of the pan-BET inhibitor mivebresib as monotherapy (MIV-mono) or in combination with venetoclax (MIV-Ven), the safety profile, efficacy, and pharmacodynamics of mivebresib were determined in patients with relapsed/refractory AML (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02391480). Mivebresib was administered at 3 monotherapy dose levels (1.5, 2.0, or 2.5 mg) or in combination with venetoclax (400 or 800 mg). RESULTS: Forty-four patients started treatment: of 19 who started MIV-mono, 5 went on to receive MIV-Ven combination therapy after disease progression and a washout period. Twenty-five patients started MIV-Ven, resulting in a total of 30 patients treated with the combination. The most common mivebresib-related treatment-emergent adverse events were dysgeusia (74%), decreased appetite (42%), and diarrhea (42%) in the MIV-mono group and decreased appetite (44%), vomiting (44%), and nausea (40%) in the MIV-Ven group. Serious adverse events occurred in 14 patients (74%) who received MIV-mono and in 22 patients (88%) who received MIV-Ven. In the MIV-mono group, responses were complete remission with incomplete blood count recovery in 1 patient and resistant disease in 15 patients. In the MIV-Ven group, responses were complete remission in 2 patients, partial remission in 2 patients, morphologic leukemia-free state in 2 patients, resistant disease in 12 patients, and aplasia in 1 patient. The pharmacodynamic effects of mivebresib were proportional to dose and drug exposure. CONCLUSIONS: Mivebresib was tolerated and showed antileukemic effects as monotherapy and in combination with venetoclax in patients with relapsed/refractory AML. LAY SUMMARY: Mivebresib is a novel drug that influences the way cancer cells read genetic information. Mivebresib was tested together with venetoclax in patients with acute myeloid leukemia after standard medicines failed and the disease returned, or when standard medicine was unavailable. Adverse effects were described for different drug doses, and the dose that is tolerable was determined. In some patients, their leukemia improved for some time. More studies are necessary to determine whether mivebresib can be used to treat acute myeloid leukemia.
Authors
Borthakur, G; Odenike, O; Aldoss, I; Rizzieri, DA; Prebet, T; Chen, C; Popovic, R; Modi, DA; Joshi, RH; Wolff, JE; Jonas, BA
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1482133
PMID
33934351
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Published Date
DOI
10.1002/cncr.33590

Impact of depth of clinical response on outcomes of acute myeloid leukemia patients in first complete remission who undergo allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients often undergo allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) in first complete remission (CR). We examined the effect of depth of clinical response, including incomplete count recovery (CRi) and/or measurable residual disease (MRD), in patients from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplantation Research (CIBMTR) registry. We identified 2492 adult patients (1799 CR and 693 CRi) who underwent alloHCT between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2015. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Multivariable analysis was performed to adjust for patient-, disease-, and transplant-related factors. Baseline characteristics were similar. Patients in CRi compared to those in CR had an increased likelihood of death (HR: 1.27; 95% confidence interval: 1.13-1.43). Compared to CR, CRi was significantly associated with increased non-relapse mortality (NRM), shorter disease-free survival (DFS), and a trend toward increased relapse. Detectable MRD was associated with shorter OS, shorter DFS, higher NRM, and increased relapse compared to absence of MRD. The deleterious effects of CRi and MRD were independent. In this large CIBMTR cohort, survival outcomes differ among AML patients based on depth of CR and presence of MRD at the time of alloHCT. Further studies should focus on optimizing post-alloHCT outcomes for patients with responses less than CR.
Authors
Percival, M-E; Wang, H-L; Zhang, M-J; Saber, W; de Lima, M; Litzow, M; Kebriaei, P; Abdel-Azim, H; Adekola, K; Aljurf, M; Bacher, U; Badawy, SM; Beitinjaneh, A; Bejanyan, N; Bhatt, V; Byrne, M; Cahn, J-Y; Castillo, P; Chao, N; Chhabra, S; Copelan, E; Cutler, C; DeFilipp, Z; Dias, A; Diaz, MA; Estey, E; Farhadfar, N; Frangoul, HA; Freytes, CO; Gale, RP; Ganguly, S; Gowda, L; Grunwald, M; Hossain, N; Kamble, RT; Kanakry, CG; Kansagra, A; Kharfan-Dabaja, MA; Krem, M; Lazarus, HM; Lee, JW; Liesveld, JL; Lin, R; Liu, H; McGuirk, J; Munker, R; Murthy, HS; Nathan, S; Nishihori, T; Olsson, RF; Palmisiano, N; Passweg, JR; Prestidge, T; Ringdén, O; Rizzieri, DA; Rybka, WB; Savoie, ML; Schultz, KR; Seo, S; Sharma, A; Solh, M; Strair, R; van der Poel, M; Verdonck, LF; Yared, JA; Weisdorf, D; Sandmaier, BM
MLA Citation
Percival, Mary-Elizabeth, et al. “Impact of depth of clinical response on outcomes of acute myeloid leukemia patients in first complete remission who undergo allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.Bone Marrow Transplant, vol. 56, no. 9, Sept. 2021, pp. 2108–17. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41409-021-01261-6.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1480791
PMID
33864019
Source
pubmed
Published In
Bone Marrow Transplant
Volume
56
Published Date
Start Page
2108
End Page
2117
DOI
10.1038/s41409-021-01261-6

Myeloablative Conditioning for Allogeneic Transplantation Results in Superior Disease-Free Survival for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes with Low/Intermediate but not High Disease Risk Index: A Center for International Blood and Ma

Compared with reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), myeloablative conditioning (MAC) is generally associated with lower relapse risk after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, disease-specific risk factors in AML/MDS can further inform when MAC and RIC may yield differential outcomes. We analyzed HCT outcomes stratified by the Disease Risk Index (DRI) in 4387 adults (age 40 to 65 years) to identify the impact of conditioning intensity. In the low/intermediate-risk DRI cohort, RIC was associated with lower nonrelapse mortality (NRM) (hazard ratio [HR], .74; 95% confidence interval [CI], .62 to .88; P < .001) but significantly greater relapse risk (HR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.35 to 1.76; P < .001) and thus inferior disease-free survival (DFS) (HR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.33; P = .001). In the high/very high-risk DRI cohort, RIC was associated with marginally lower NRM (HR, .83; 95% CI, .68 to 1.00; P = .051) and significantly higher relapse risk (HR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.41; P = .002), leading to similar DFS using either RIC or MAC. These data support MAC over RIC as the preferred conditioning intensity for patients with AML/MDS with low/intermediate-risk DRI, but with a similar benefit as RIC in high/very high-risk DRI. Novel MAC regimens with less toxicity could benefit all patients, but more potent antineoplastic approaches are needed for the high/very-high risk DRI group.
Authors
Bejanyan, N; Zhang, M; Bo-Subait, K; Brunstein, C; Wang, H; Warlick, ED; Giralt, S; Nishihori, T; Martino, R; Passweg, J; Dias, A; Copelan, E; Hale, G; Gale, RP; Solh, M; Kharfan-Dabaja, MA; Diaz, MA; Ganguly, S; Gore, S; Verdonck, LF; Hossain, NM; Kekre, N; Savani, B; Byrne, M; Kanakry, C; Cairo, MS; Ciurea, S; Schouten, HC; Bredeson, C; Munker, R; Lazarus, H; Cahn, J-Y; van Der Poel, M; Rizzieri, D; Yared, JA; Freytes, C; Cerny, J; Aljurf, M; Palmisiano, ND; Pawarode, A; Bacher, VU; Grunwald, MR; Nathan, S; Wirk, B; Hildebrandt, GC; Seo, S; Olsson, RF; George, B; de Lima, M; Hourigan, CS; Sandmaier, BM; Litzow, M; Kebriaei, P; Saber, W; Weisdorf, D
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1462230
PMID
33010430
Source
pubmed
Published In
Transplant Cell Ther
Volume
27
Published Date
Start Page
68.e1
End Page
68.e9
DOI
10.1016/j.bbmt.2020.09.026

Durable Remission and Long-Term Survival in Relapsed/Refractory (r/r) AML Patients Treated with Guadecitabine, Median Survival Not Reached for Responders after Long Term Follow up from Phase 2 Study of 103 Patients

<jats:p>Background: Guadecitabine is a next generation subcutaneous (SC) hypomethylating agent (HMA) resistant to degradation by cytidine deaminase which results in prolonged in vivo exposure to the active metabolite decitabine. We conducted a phase 2 study of guadecitabine in 103 r/r AML patients. We present here duration of response and long-term survival results.</jats:p> <jats:p>M ethods: We conducted a phase 2 study of guadecitabine using different regimens and doses (randomized 5-day regimen cohorts of 60 mg/m2/d vs 90 mg/m2/d SC) and a cohort of 10-day regimen in the first 1-4 cycles at 60 mg/m2/d followed by subsequent cycles of 5-day regimen). Response and duration of response were assessed using IWG 2003 criteria: Complete Response (CR), CR with incomplete platelet recovery (CRp), and CR with incomplete count recovery (CRi). CR+CRp+CRi was defined as composite CR (CRc). Overall survival (OS) was assessed using the Kaplan-Meier (KM) method. Response status for each dose/regimen cohort and the overall treated population were assessed with analyses of duration of response and long-term survival.</jats:p> <jats:p>Results: The study completed enrolment of 103 r/r AML patients: 50 patients received 5-day regime at 60 mg/m2/d (24 patients) or 90 mg/m2/d (26 patients), and 53 patients received the 10-day (60 mg/m2/d). Median follow up was 2.4 years (29.1 months). Patients' characteristics for the 103 r/r AML patients enrolled included median age of 60y (range 22-82y), poor risk cytogenetics in 41%, prior hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) in 18%, median number of prior regimens 2 (range 1-10), primary refractory to induction therapy in 47%, and 41% had a high disease burden of BM blasts &amp;gt;40%. There was no significant difference in CR or OS between 60 and 90 mg/m2/d 5-day regimen but the CR and CRc rates were higher on the 10-day regimen (19% and 30% respectively) vs the 5-day regimen (8% and 16%). When all regimens analyzed together, 24/103 patients (23.3%) achieved CRc. Responses (CRc) were achieved in several poor prognosis subgroups including 19% in patients with poor risk cytogenetics, 31% of refractory patients, 26% of patients who relapsed after prior HCT, and 22% in patients with early relapse (&amp;lt; 6 months from their prior treatment). Of the 24 CRc patients, 15 (63%) were refractory to induction, 8 (33%) had poor risk cytogenetics, and 5 (21%) had prior HCT, and 14 (58%) went on to receive HCT following response. Median overall duration of response for patients with CR, and CRc were 7 and 7.8 months respectively. After long term follow up, median OS has not been reached in patients who achieved CRc (either CR or CRp/CRi). The 2-year survival rate was 57% for CR, and 50% for CRp/CRi (Fig. 1). Median OS has not yet been reached and was similar in CRc patients who went on to receive HCT post CRc (14 patients) compared to CRc patients who did not receive HCT post treatment (10 patients) (Fig.2). The 2-year survival rate was also similar for both groups (50% for those receiving HCT vs 60% for those who did not undergo HCT). Most patients were still on guadecitabine treatment until death, progression, or HCT with no other subsequent treatment. Guadecitabine was well tolerated in all cohorts with Grade 3 or higher AEs related to the drug seen in 42% of patients predominantly myelosuppression and related infections. There was no related serious AEs leading to death. The results highlight the long survival benefit for guadecitabine responders that exceeds duration of response and seems irrespective of post treatment HCT. The results also suggest that in r/r AML patients treated with guadecitabine, CRp/CRi seem to confer a similar survival benefit to CR patients suggesting that the incomplete peripheral blood count recovery may reflect continued treatment-related myelosuppression rather than active residual disease.</jats:p> <jats:p>Summary/Conclusions: In a phase 2 study of HMA guadecitabinein heavily pretreated r/r AML patients, 47% of whom had refractory disease, CR, CRp, and CRi all conferred long survival benefit. With a median follow up of almost 2.5 years, more than half of responding patients were still alive at 2 years and their median OS has not yet been reached. In addition, treatment with guadecitabine allowed post treatment HCT in 58% of responders.</jats:p> <jats:p /> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Disclosures</jats:title> <jats:p>Griffiths: Celgene, Inc: Consultancy, Research Funding; Appelis Pharmaceuticals: Other: PI on a clinical trial; Appelis Pharmaceuticals: Other: PI on a clinical trial; Onconova Therapeutics: Other: PI on a clinical trial; Onconova Therapeutics: Other: PI on a clinical trial; Abbvie, Inc.: Consultancy, PI on a clinical trial; Abbvie, Inc.: Consultancy; Genentech, Inc.: Research Funding; Genentech, Inc.: Research Funding; New Link Genetics: Consultancy; New Link Genetics: Consultancy; Astex Phramaceuticals/Otsuka Pharmaceuticals: Consultancy, Research Funding; Astex Phramaceuticals/Otsuka Pharmaceuticals: Consultancy, Research Funding; Novartis Inc.: Consultancy; Boston Scientific: Consultancy; Boston Scientific: Consultancy; Persimmune: Consultancy; Persimmune: Consultancy; Partner Therapeutics: Consultancy; Novartis Inc.: Consultancy; Celgene, Inc: Consultancy, Research Funding; Partner Therapeutics: Consultancy. Kantarjian:Daiichi-Sankyo: Research Funding; Jazz Pharma: Research Funding; Cyclacel: Research Funding; Pfizer: Honoraria, Research Funding; Ariad: Research Funding; Actinium: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Takeda: Honoraria; AbbVie: Honoraria, Research Funding; Agios: Honoraria, Research Funding; Novartis: Research Funding; Immunogen: Research Funding; Astex: Research Funding; BMS: Research Funding; Amgen: Honoraria, Research Funding. O'Connell:BMS: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Shionogi: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Astex: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding; Genentech: Research Funding; Pfizer: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Yee:Astex: Research Funding; Hoffman La Roche: Research Funding; Celgene: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding; Novartis: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding; MedImmune: Research Funding; Takeda: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Pfizer: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Merck: Research Funding; Millennium: Research Funding; Astellas: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Stock:Astellas: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Daiichi: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Pfizer: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Kite, a Gilead Company: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Research to Practice: Honoraria; Agios: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; UpToDate: Honoraria. Jabbour:Takeda: Consultancy, Research Funding; BMS: Consultancy, Research Funding; Adaptive: Consultancy, Research Funding; Amgen: Consultancy, Research Funding; AbbVie: Consultancy, Research Funding; Pfizer: Consultancy, Research Funding; Cyclacel LTD: Research Funding. Ritchie:Genentech: Other: Advisory board; Ariad, Celgene, Incyte, Novartis: Speakers Bureau; AStella, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Novartis, NS Pharma, Pfizer: Research Funding; Celgene, Novartis: Other: travel support; Jazz Pharmaceuticals: Research Funding; Celgene: Other: Advisory board; Pfizer: Other: Advisory board, travel support; agios: Other: Advisory board; Tolero: Other: Advisory board; Celgene, Incyte, Novartis, Pfizer: Consultancy. Rizzieri:Celgene, Gilead, Seattle Genetics, Stemline: Other: Speaker; AbbVie, Agios, AROG, Bayer, Celgene, Gilead, Jazz, Novartis, Pfizer, Sanofi, Seattle Genetics, Stemline, Teva: Other: Advisory Board; AROG, Bayer, Celgene, Celltron, Mustang, Pfizer, Seattle Genetics, Stemline: Consultancy; Stemline: Research Funding. Su:Astex Pharmaceuticals, Inc.: Employment. Azab:Astex Pharmaceuticals, Inc.: Employment. Roboz:Celgene: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Bayer: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; AbbVie: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Actinium: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Agios: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Amphivena: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Argenx: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Astex: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Astellas: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Otsuka: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Celltrion: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Pfizer: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Roche/Genentech: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Sandoz: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Takeda: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Trovagene: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Daiichi Sankyo: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Eisai: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Janssen: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Jazz: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; MEI Pharma: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Orsenix: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Novartis: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees.</jats:p> </jats:sec>
Authors
Griffiths, EA; Kantarjian, HM; O'Connell, CL; Yee, KWL; Stock, W; Daver, NG; Jabbour, E; Ritchie, EK; Issa, J-P; Walsh, KJ; Rizzieri, DA; Lunin, SD; Su, XY; Azab, M; Roboz, GJ
MLA Citation
Griffiths, Elizabeth A., et al. “Durable Remission and Long-Term Survival in Relapsed/Refractory (r/r) AML Patients Treated with Guadecitabine, Median Survival Not Reached for Responders after Long Term Follow up from Phase 2 Study of 103 Patients.” Blood, vol. 134, no. Supplement_1, American Society of Hematology, 2019, pp. 1319–1319. Crossref, doi:10.1182/blood-2019-131394.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1470014
Source
crossref
Published In
Blood
Volume
134
Published Date
Start Page
1319
End Page
1319
DOI
10.1182/blood-2019-131394

Outcomes in Patients with Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia (t-AML) Who Achieved Remission with CPX-351 Versus 7+3: Phase 3 Exploratory Analysis

Authors
Rizzieri, DA; Schiller, GJ; Solomon, SR; Newell, LF; Erba, HP; Ryan, RJ; Faderl, S; Cortes, JE; Lancet, JE
MLA Citation
Rizzieri, David A., et al. “Outcomes in Patients with Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia (t-AML) Who Achieved Remission with CPX-351 Versus 7+3: Phase 3 Exploratory Analysis.” Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, vol. 26, no. 3, ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2020, pp. S105–06.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1434902
Source
wos
Published In
Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation : Journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Volume
26
Published Date
Start Page
S105
End Page
S106

Research Areas:

Burkitt Lymphoma
Burkitts lymphoma
Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation
Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Hematopoietic stem cell disorders
Hematopoietic stem cells--Transplantation
Leukemia
Leukemia, B-Cell
Leukemia, Biphenotypic, Acute
Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute
Leukemia, Hairy Cell
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell
Leukemia, Prolymphocytic, T-Cell
Leukemia, T-Cell
Leukemia-Lymphoma, Adult T-Cell
Lymphoblastic leukemia
Lymphocytic leukemia
Lymphoma, B-Cell
Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse
Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic
Lymphoma, T-Cell
Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral
Lymphomas
Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation
Precursor B-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma
Stem Cell Transplantation
Stem Cells
Stem cell donors