April Salama

Positions:

Associate Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2004

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Internal Medicine

University of Chicago

Hematology/Oncology

University of Chicago

Grants:

Collaborative Success: Expanding Options for Patients with Melanoma

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Project Lead
Start Date
End Date

MK-3475-587-00

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

ECHO-208

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

(BMS Adjuvant-915)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Immunocore

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Mind the gap: Gendered publication trends in oncology.

BACKGROUND:Investigating scientific publication trends in the field of oncology may highlight opportunities for improved representation, mentorship, collaboration, and advancement for women. METHODS:We conducted a bibliometric analysis of Annals of Surgical Oncology; Cancer; International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics (IJROBP); JAMA Oncology; and Journal of Clinical Oncology in 1990, 2000, 2010, and 2017. Full name and degree credentials per author role (ie, first or senior author), article type, publication year, and citation metrics were collected. First names were used to identify author gender. RESULTS:Across 9189 articles, female representation rose between 1990 and 2017 (first authors: 17.7% in 1990, 36.6% in 2017; senior authors: 11.7% in 1990, 28.5% in 2017). For the 50 most cited articles per year, women comprised a smaller percent of first (26.5%) and senior (19.9%) authors. The average citation count was higher for male first (44.8 per article) and senior (47.1) authors compared to female first (39.7) and senior (44.1) authors. With male senior authors, the first author was more likely male (71.4% male; 25.0% female); with female senior authors, first authors were 50.2% male and 47.6% female. IJROBP had the lowest total female representation among first (25.1%) and senior (16.7%) authors. Women had more MDs with Masters degrees, whereas men held more MDs only and more MDs with PhDs. CONCLUSION:Despite positive trends, substantial gendered differences in oncology publications persist. Fostering more women in oncology research will benefit female representation at many levels of academia and improve productivity, collaboration, and recruitment, especially in technical fields such as radiation and surgical oncology.
Authors
Dalal, NH; Chino, F; Williamson, H; Beasley, GM; Salama, AKS; Palta, M
MLA Citation
Dalal, Nicole H., et al. “Mind the gap: Gendered publication trends in oncology.Cancer, vol. 126, no. 12, June 2020, pp. 2859–65. Epmc, doi:10.1002/cncr.32818.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1435855
PMID
32212334
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer
Volume
126
Published Date
Start Page
2859
End Page
2865
DOI
10.1002/cncr.32818

Phase I study of cemiplimab, a human monoclonal anti-PD-1, in patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC): Longer follow-up efficacy and safety data.

Authors
Owonikoko, TK; Papadopoulos, KP; Gil-Martin, M; Moreno, V; Salama, AK; Calvo, E; Safran, H; González-Martín, A; Aljumaily, R; Mahadevan, D; Niu, J; Kal Mohan, K; Li, J; Stankevich, E; Mathias, M; Lowy, I; Fury, MG; Babiker, HM
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1434090
PMID
32137181
Source
pubmed
Published In
Ann Oncol
Volume
29 Suppl 8
Published Date
Start Page
viii461
End Page
viii462
DOI
10.1093/annonc/mdy289.048

A tumor-intrinsic PD-L1/NLRP3 inflammasome signaling pathway drives resistance to anti-PD-1 immunotherapy.

An in-depth understanding of immune escape mechanisms in cancer is likely to lead to innovative advances in immunotherapeutic strategies. However, much remains unknown regarding these mechanisms and how they impact immunotherapy resistance. Using several preclinical tumor models as well as clinical specimens, we identified a mechanism whereby CD8+ T cell activation in response to programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) blockade induced a programmed death ligand 1/NOD-, LRR-, and pyrin domain-containing protein 3 (PD-L1/NLRP3) inflammasome signaling cascade that ultimately led to the recruitment of granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (PMN-MDSCs) into tumor tissues, thereby dampening the resulting antitumor immune response. The genetic and pharmacologic inhibition of NLRP3 suppressed PMN-MDSC tumor infiltration and significantly augmented the efficacy of anti-PD-1 antibody immunotherapy. This pathway therefore represents a tumor-intrinsic mechanism of adaptive resistance to anti-PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapy and is a promising target for future translational research.
Authors
Theivanthiran, B; Evans, KS; DeVito, NC; Plebanek, M; Sturdivant, M; Wachsmuth, LP; Salama, AK; Kang, Y; Hsu, D; Balko, JM; Johnson, DB; Starr, M; Nixon, A; Holtzhausen, A; Hanks, BA
MLA Citation
Theivanthiran, Balamayoora, et al. “A tumor-intrinsic PD-L1/NLRP3 inflammasome signaling pathway drives resistance to anti-PD-1 immunotherapy.J Clin Invest, vol. 130, no. 5, May 2020, pp. 2570–86. Pubmed, doi:10.1172/JCI133055.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1431106
PMID
32017708
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Clin Invest
Volume
130
Published Date
Start Page
2570
End Page
2586
DOI
10.1172/JCI133055

Phase Ib/II study of the combination of SD-101 and pembrolizumab in patients with advanced melanoma who had progressive disease on or after prior anti-PD-1 therapy.

Authors
Ribas, A; Mehmi, I; Medina, T; Lao, C; Kummar, S; Amin, A; Deva, S; Salama, AK; Tueting, T; Milhem, M; Hoimes, CJ; Daniels, G; Shaheen, M; Jang, S; Barve, M; Powell, A; Chandra, S; Schmidt, EV; Janssen, R; Long, GV
MLA Citation
Ribas, A., et al. “Phase Ib/II study of the combination of SD-101 and pembrolizumab in patients with advanced melanoma who had progressive disease on or after prior anti-PD-1 therapy.Ann Oncol, vol. 29 Suppl 8, Oct. 2018, pp. viii451–52. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/annonc/mdy289.021.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1434144
PMID
32137150
Source
pubmed
Published In
Ann Oncol
Volume
29 Suppl 8
Published Date
Start Page
viii451
End Page
viii452
DOI
10.1093/annonc/mdy289.021

A review of cancer immunotherapy toxicity.

Cancer immunotherapies, including checkpoint inhibitors and adoptive cell therapy, manipulate the immune system to recognize and attack cancer cells. These therapies have the potential to induce durable responses in multiple solid and hematologic malignancies and thus have transformed treatment algorithms for numerous tumor types. Cancer immunotherapies lead to unique toxicity profiles distinct from the toxicities of other cancer therapies, depending on their mechanism of action. These toxicities often require specific management, which can include steroids and immune-modulating therapy and for which consensus guidelines have been published. This review will focus on the toxicities of checkpoint inhibitors and chimeric antigen receptor T cells, including pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management.
Authors
Kennedy, LB; Salama, AKS
MLA Citation
Kennedy, Lucy Boyce, and April K. S. Salama. “A review of cancer immunotherapy toxicity.Ca Cancer J Clin, vol. 70, no. 2, Mar. 2020, pp. 86–104. Pubmed, doi:10.3322/caac.21596.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1428543
PMID
31944278
Source
pubmed
Published In
Ca: a Cancer Journal for Clinicians
Volume
70
Published Date
Start Page
86
End Page
104
DOI
10.3322/caac.21596