April Salama

Positions:

Associate Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2004

University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

Internal Medicine

The University of Chicago

Hematology/Oncology

The University of Chicago

Grants:

Collaborative Success: Expanding Options for Patients with Melanoma

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Project Lead
Start Date
End Date

A Multicenter, Open label, Phase III Extension Trial to Study the Long-term Safety and Efficacy in Participants with Advanced Tumors Who Are Currently on Treatment or in Follow-up in a Pembrolizumab Trial.

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Merck Sharp & Dohme
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

INCB 24360-208 A Phase 1/2, Open-Label, Dose-Escalation, Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy Study of Epacadostat and Nivolumab in Combination With Immune Therapies in Subjects With Advanced or Metastatic Malignancies (ECHO-208)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Incyte Corporation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase 3, Randomized Study of Adjuvant Immunotherapy with Nivolumab Combined with Ipilimumab versus Nivolumab Monotherapy after Complete Resection of Stage IIIb/c/d or Stage IV Melanoma

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Bristol-Myers Squibb Company
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase II Randomized, Open-label, Multi-center Study of the Safety and Efficacy of IMCgp100 Compared with Investigator's Choice in HLA-A*0201 Positive Patients with Previously Untreated Advanced Uveal Melanoma

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Immunocore Limited
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Checkpoint Inhibitors in Melanoma Patients with Underlying Autoimmune Disease.

The development of immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) has dramatically changed the clinical management of metastatic melanoma and other solid tumors. Despite exclusion from initial clinical trials, there is a growing body of retrospective data that suggest ICI can be used in patients with underlying autoimmune disease (AID) with a tolerable level of anticipated immune-related adverse events (irAEs) and a rate of severe irAEs comparable to that of patients without underlying AID. Coordination with other subspecialists and careful monitoring for irAEs is critical in safely managing these patients. Studies exploring novel approaches examining the use of targeted immunosuppressants in the prevention and management of irAEs, as well as multiple studies currently underway are aimed at establishing safe clinical practices when using ICI in patients with underlying AID.
Authors
Dietz, H; Weinmann, SC; Salama, AK
MLA Citation
Dietz, Hilary, et al. “Checkpoint Inhibitors in Melanoma Patients with Underlying Autoimmune Disease.Cancer Manag Res, vol. 13, 2021, pp. 8199–208. Pubmed, doi:10.2147/CMAR.S283217.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1501363
PMID
34754240
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Management and Research
Volume
13
Published Date
Start Page
8199
End Page
8208
DOI
10.2147/CMAR.S283217

A Need for More Molecular Profiling in Brain Metastases.

As local disease control improves, the public health impact of brain metastases (BrM) continues to grow. Molecular features are frequently different between primary and metastatic tumors as a result of clonal evolution during neoplasm migration, selective pressures imposed by systemic treatments, and differences in the local microenvironment. However, biomarker information in BrM is not routinely obtained despite emerging evidence of its clinical value. We review evidence of discordance in clinically actionable biomarkers between primary tumors, extracranial metastases, and BrM. Although BrM biopsy/resection imposes clinical risks, these risks must be weighed against the potential benefits of assessing biomarkers in BrM. First, new treatment targets unique to a patient's BrM may be identified. Second, as BrM may occur late in a patient's disease course, resistance to initial targeted therapies and/or loss of previously identified biomarkers can occur by the time of occult BrM, rendering initial and other targeted therapies ineffective. Thus, current biomarker data can inform real-time treatment options. Third, biomarker information in BrM may provide useful prognostic information for patients. Appreciating the importance of biomarker analyses in BrM tissue, including how it may identify specific drivers of BrM, is critical for the development of more effective treatment strategies to improve outcomes for this growing patient population.
Authors
Shen, E; Van Swearingen, AED; Price, MJ; Bulsara, K; Verhaak, RGW; Baëta, C; Painter, BD; Reitman, ZJ; Salama, AKS; Clarke, JM; Anders, CK; Fecci, PE; Goodwin, CR; Walsh, KM
MLA Citation
Shen, Erica, et al. “A Need for More Molecular Profiling in Brain Metastases.Front Oncol, vol. 11, 2021, p. 785064. Pubmed, doi:10.3389/fonc.2021.785064.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1509906
PMID
35145903
Source
pubmed
Published In
Frontiers in Oncology
Volume
11
Published Date
Start Page
785064
DOI
10.3389/fonc.2021.785064

Identification of a Germline Pyrin Variant in a Metastatic Melanoma Patient With Multiple Spontaneous Regressions and Immune-related Adverse Events.

The mechanisms underlying tumor immunosurveillance and their association with the immune-related adverse events (irAEs) associated with checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapies remain poorly understood. We describe a metastatic melanoma patient exhibiting multiple episodes of spontaneous disease regression followed by the development of several irAEs during the course of anti-programmed cell death protein 1 antibody immunotherapy. Whole-exome next-generation sequencing studies revealed this patient to harbor a pyrin inflammasome variant previously described to be associated with an atypical presentation of familial Mediterranean fever. This work highlights a potential role for inflammasomes in the regulation of tumor immunosurveillance and the pathogenesis of irAEs.
Authors
Oswalt, CJ; Al-Rohil, RN; Theivanthiran, B; Haykal, T; Salama, AKS; DeVito, NC; Holtzhausen, A; Ko, DC; Hanks, BA
MLA Citation
Oswalt, Cameron J., et al. “Identification of a Germline Pyrin Variant in a Metastatic Melanoma Patient With Multiple Spontaneous Regressions and Immune-related Adverse Events.J Immunother, vol. 45, no. 6, July 2022, pp. 284–90. Pubmed, doi:10.1097/CJI.0000000000000425.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1522074
PMID
35621992
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Immunother
Volume
45
Published Date
Start Page
284
End Page
290
DOI
10.1097/CJI.0000000000000425

A Marathon Not a Sprint: Improving Outcomes for Patients With Metastatic Melanoma in 2022 and Beyond.

Authors
Kennedy, LB; Salama, AKS
MLA Citation
Kennedy, Lucy Boyce, and April K. S. Salama. “A Marathon Not a Sprint: Improving Outcomes for Patients With Metastatic Melanoma in 2022 and Beyond.Jco Oncol Pract, vol. 18, no. 5, May 2022, pp. 353–54. Pubmed, doi:10.1200/OP.22.00012.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1511970
PMID
35196070
Source
pubmed
Published In
Jco Oncol Pract
Volume
18
Published Date
Start Page
353
End Page
354
DOI
10.1200/OP.22.00012

1014P Characterization of cytokine release syndrome (CRS) following treatment with tebentafusp in previously untreated patients with metastatic uveal melanoma

Authors
Salama, AKS; Cheshuk, V; Siveke, J; Berrocal, A; Abdullah, SE; Lockwood, S; McCully, ML; Kee, D
MLA Citation
Salama, A. K. S., et al. “1014P Characterization of cytokine release syndrome (CRS) following treatment with tebentafusp in previously untreated patients with metastatic uveal melanoma.” Annals of Oncology, vol. 32, Elsevier BV, 2021, pp. S855–S855. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.annonc.2021.08.1398.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1498876
Source
crossref
Published In
Annals of Oncology
Volume
32
Published Date
Start Page
S855
End Page
S855
DOI
10.1016/j.annonc.2021.08.1398