April Salama

Positions:

Associate Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2004

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Internal Medicine

University of Chicago

Hematology/Oncology

University of Chicago

Grants:

Collaborative Success: Expanding Options for Patients with Melanoma

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Project Lead
Start Date
End Date

MK-3475-587-00

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

ECHO-208

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

(BMS Adjuvant-915)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Immunocore

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Operative and peri-operative considerations in the management of brain metastasis.

The number of patients who develop metastatic brain lesions is increasing as the diagnosis and treatment of systemic cancers continues to improve, resulting in longer patient survival. The role of surgery in the management of brain metastasis (BM), particularly multiple and recurrent metastases, remains controversial and continues to evolve. However, with appropriate patient selection, outcomes after surgery are typically favorable. In addition, surgery is the only means to obtain a tissue diagnosis and is the only effective treatment modality to quickly relieve neurological complications or life-threatening symptoms related to significant mass effect, CSF obstruction, and peritumoral edema. As such, a thorough understanding of the role of surgery in patients with metastatic brain lesions, as well as the factors associated with surgical outcomes, is essential for the effective management of this unique and growing patient population.
Authors
Sankey, EW; Tsvankin, V; Grabowski, MM; Nayar, G; Batich, KA; Risman, A; Champion, CD; Salama, AKS; Goodwin, CR; Fecci, PE
MLA Citation
Sankey, Eric W., et al. “Operative and peri-operative considerations in the management of brain metastasis..” Cancer Med, vol. 8, no. 16, Nov. 2019, pp. 6809–31. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cam4.2577.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1415257
PMID
31568689
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Medicine
Volume
8
Published Date
Start Page
6809
End Page
6831
DOI
10.1002/cam4.2577

Mind the Gap: Gendered Publication Trends in Academic Oncology

Authors
Dalal, NH; Chino, F; Williamson, H; Beasley, G; Salama, AKS; Palta, M
MLA Citation
Dalal, N. H., et al. “Mind the Gap: Gendered Publication Trends in Academic Oncology.” International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics, vol. 105, no. 1, Elsevier BV, 2019, pp. E146–E146. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2019.06.2198.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1415246
Source
crossref
Published In
International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics
Volume
105
Published Date
Start Page
E146
End Page
E146
DOI
10.1016/j.ijrobp.2019.06.2198

Dabrafenib and trametinib in patients with tumors with BRAF V600E/K mutations: Results from the molecular analysis for therapy choice (MATCH) Arm H.

Authors
Salama, AKS; Li, S; Macrae, ER; Park, J-I; Mitchell, EP; Zwiebel, JA; Chen, HX; Gray, RJ; McShane, L; Rubinstein, L; Patton, D; Williams, PM; Hamilton, SR; Armstrong, DK; Conley, BA; Arteaga, CL; Harris, L; O'Dwyer, PJ; Chen, AP; Flaherty, K
MLA Citation
Salama, April K. S., et al. “Dabrafenib and trametinib in patients with tumors with BRAF V600E/K mutations: Results from the molecular analysis for therapy choice (MATCH) Arm H..” Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 37, no. 15_suppl, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), 2019, pp. 3002–3002. Crossref, doi:10.1200/jco.2019.37.15_suppl.3002.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1415586
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
37
Published Date
Start Page
3002
End Page
3002
DOI
10.1200/jco.2019.37.15_suppl.3002

Neoadjuvant systemic therapy in melanoma: recommendations of the International Neoadjuvant Melanoma Consortium.

Advances in the treatment of metastatic melanoma have improved responses and survival. However, many patients continue to experience resistance or toxicity to treatment, highlighting a crucial need to identify biomarkers and understand mechanisms of response and toxicity. Neoadjuvant therapy for regional metastases might improve operability and clinical outcomes over upfront surgery and adjuvant therapy, and has become an established role for drug development and biomarker discovery in other cancers (including locally advanced breast cancer, head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, gastroesophageal cancer, and anal cancer). Patients with clinically detectable stage III melanoma are ideal candidates for neoadjuvant therapy, because they represent a high-risk patient population with poor outcomes when treated with upfront surgery alone. Neoadjuvant therapy is now an active area of research for melanoma with numerous completed and ongoing trials (since 2014) with disparate designs, endpoints, and analyses under investigation. We have, therefore, established the International Neoadjuvant Melanoma Consortium with experts in medical oncology, surgical oncology, pathology, radiation oncology, radiology, and translational research to develop recommendations for investigating neoadjuvant therapy in melanoma to align future trial designs and correlative analyses. Alignment and consistency of neoadjuvant trials will facilitate optimal data organisation for future regulatory review and strengthen translational research across the melanoma disease continuum.
Authors
Amaria, RN; Menzies, AM; Burton, EM; Scolyer, RA; Tetzlaff, MT; Antdbacka, R; Ariyan, C; Bassett, R; Carter, B; Daud, A; Faries, M; Fecher, LA; Flaherty, KT; Gershenwald, JE; Hamid, O; Hong, A; Kirkwood, JM; Lo, S; Margolin, K; Messina, J; Postow, MA; Rizos, H; Ross, MI; Rozeman, EA; Saw, RPM; Sondak, V; Sullivan, RJ; Taube, JM; Thompson, JF; van de Wiel, BA; Eggermont, AM; Davies, MA; International Neoadjuvant Melanoma Consortium members,; Ascierto, PA; Spillane, AJ; van Akkooi, ACJ; Wargo, JA; Blank, CU; Tawbi, HA; Long, GV
MLA Citation
Amaria, Rodabe N., et al. “Neoadjuvant systemic therapy in melanoma: recommendations of the International Neoadjuvant Melanoma Consortium..” Lancet Oncol, vol. 20, no. 7, July 2019, pp. e378–89. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/S1470-2045(19)30332-8.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1395908
PMID
31267972
Source
pubmed
Published In
Lancet Oncol
Volume
20
Published Date
Start Page
e378
End Page
e389
DOI
10.1016/S1470-2045(19)30332-8

Neuro-ophthalmic side effects of molecularly targeted cancer drugs.

The past two decades has been an amazing time in the advancement of cancer treatment. Molecularly targeted therapy is a concept in which specific cellular molecules (overexpressed, mutationally activated, or selectively expressed proteins) are manipulated in an advantageous manner to decrease the transformation, proliferation, and/or survival of cancer cells. In addition, increased knowledge of the role of the immune system in carcinogenesis has led to the development of immune checkpoint inhibitors to restore and enhance cellular-mediated antitumor immunity. The United States Food and Drug Administration approval of the chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) rituximab in 1997 for the treatment of B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma ushered in a new era of targeted therapy for cancer. A year later, trastuzumab, a humanized mAb, was approved for patients with breast cancer. In 2001, imatinib was the first small-molecule kinase inhibitor approved. The approval of ipilimumab-the first in class immune checkpoint inhibitor-in 2011 serves as a landmark period of time in the resurgence of immunotherapy for cancer. Despite the notion that increased tumor specificity results in decreased complications, toxicity remains a major hurdle in the development and implementation of many of the targeted anticancer drugs. This article will provide an overview of the current cellular and immunological understanding of cancer pathogenesis-the foundation upon which molecularly targeted therapies were developed-and a description of the ocular and neuro-ophthalmic toxicity profile of mAbs, immune checkpoint inhibitors, and small-molecule kinase inhibitors.
Authors
Bhatti, MT; Salama, AKS
MLA Citation
Bhatti, M. T., and A. K. S. Salama. “Neuro-ophthalmic side effects of molecularly targeted cancer drugs..” Eye (Lond), vol. 32, no. 2, Feb. 2018, pp. 287–301. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/eye.2017.222.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1279684
PMID
29052609
Source
pubmed
Published In
Eye (London, England)
Volume
32
Published Date
Start Page
287
End Page
301
DOI
10.1038/eye.2017.222