Joseph Salama

Overview:

I have the privilege to be the Chief of the Durham VA Radiation Oncology Service, where I care for veterans who have served our country. I am a dedicated educator, serving as the Residency Program Director for the Duke Radiation Oncology Residency Program.  I am also a cancer researcher developing novel treatment techniques for patients with head and neck cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and those limited metastatic disease, and integration of these treatments with drug therapies. 

Positions:

Professor of Radiation Oncology

Radiation Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2001

Baylor College of Medicine

Transitional Year Resident, Radiation Oncology

University of Texas Medical School, Houston

Resident, Radiation Oncology

The University of Chicago

Chief Resident, Radiation Oncology

The University of Chicago

Grants:

Publications:

Facilitating the Transition to Independent Radiation Oncology Practice Through a Resident-Led, Veterans Affairs Teaching Hospital Service.

Authors
Price, JG; Moravan, MJ; Boyer, MJ; Palta, M; Stephens, SJ; Eyler, CE; Siglin, JJ; Solanki, AA; Patel, PR; Lee, WR; Salama, JK
MLA Citation
Price, Jeremy G., et al. “Facilitating the Transition to Independent Radiation Oncology Practice Through a Resident-Led, Veterans Affairs Teaching Hospital Service.Pract Radiat Oncol, vol. 11, no. 6, Nov. 2021, pp. 441–47. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.prro.2021.08.006.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1500590
PMID
34742458
Source
pubmed
Published In
Pract Radiat Oncol
Volume
11
Published Date
Start Page
441
End Page
447
DOI
10.1016/j.prro.2021.08.006

Veliparib in combination with carboplatin/paclitaxel-based chemoradiotherapy in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer.

OBJECTIVES: Veliparib is a potent poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase (PARP) 1 and 2 inhibitor that impedes repair of DNA damage induced by cytotoxic and radiation therapies. This phase 1 study evaluated veliparib in combination with chemoradiotherapy in patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients received veliparib orally twice daily (BID) in escalating doses (60-240 mg, Day -3 to 1 day after last dose of radiation) combined with weekly carboplatin (area under the curve [AUC] 2 mg/mL/min), paclitaxel (45 mg/m2), and daily radiation therapy (60 Gy in 30 fractions), followed by two cycles of veliparib (120-240 mg BID, Days -2 through 5 of each 21-day cycle), carboplatin (AUC 6 mg/mL/min, Day 1 of each cycle), and paclitaxel (200 mg/m2, Day 1 of each cycle) consolidation. Endpoints included veliparib maximum tolerated dose (MTD), recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D), pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy. RESULTS: Forty-eight patients were enrolled. The MTD/RP2D of veliparib was 240 mg BID with chemoradiotherapy followed by 120 mg BID with consolidation. The most common any-grade adverse events (AEs) in this cohort for the whole treatment period were nausea (83%), esophagitis (75%), neutropenia (75%), and thrombocytopenia (75%). Dose-proportional pharmacokinetics of veliparib were observed. Median progression-free survival (mPFS) was 19.6 months (95% CI: 9.7-32.6). Median overall survival was estimated to be 32.6 months (95% CI: 15.0-not reached). In patients treated with the RP2D, mPFS was 19.6 months (95% CI: 3.0-not reached). CONCLUSIONS: When combined with standard concurrent chemoradiotherapy and consolidation chemotherapy in patients with stage III NSCLC, veliparib demonstrated an acceptable safety profile and antitumor activity with an mPFS of 19.6 months.
Authors
Kozono, DE; Stinchcombe, TE; Salama, JK; Bogart, J; Petty, WJ; Guarino, MJ; Bazhenova, L; Larner, JM; Weiss, J; DiPetrillo, TA; Feigenberg, SJ; Chen, X; Sun, Z; Nuthalapati, S; Rosenwinkel, L; Johnson, EF; Bach, BA; Luo, Y; Vokes, EE
MLA Citation
Kozono, David E., et al. “Veliparib in combination with carboplatin/paclitaxel-based chemoradiotherapy in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer.Lung Cancer, vol. 159, Sept. 2021, pp. 56–65. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.lungcan.2021.06.028.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1489835
PMID
34311345
Source
pubmed
Published In
Lung Cancer
Volume
159
Published Date
Start Page
56
End Page
65
DOI
10.1016/j.lungcan.2021.06.028

Effective Pain Control With Very Low Dose Palliative Radiation Therapy for Patients With Multiple Myeloma With Uncomplicated Osseous Lesions.

BACKGROUND: Osteolytic lesions are present in 75% of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and frequently require palliation with radiation therapy (RT). Prior case series of patients with MM with bone pain undergoing palliative RT suggests doses ≥12 Gy (equivalent dose in 2Gy fractions, EQD2) provide excellent bone pain relief. However, recent advances in care and novel biologic agents have significantly improved overall survival and quality of life for patients with MM. We hypothesized that lower-dose RT (LDRT, EQD2 <12 Gy) offers an effective alternative to higher-dose RT (HDRT, EQD2 ≥12 Gy) for palliation of painful, uncomplicated MM bone lesions. METHODS: We retrospectively identified patients with MM treated with RT for uncomplicated, painful bone lesions and stratified by EQD2 ≥/< 12 Gy. Clinical pain response (CPR) rates, acute and late toxicity, pain response duration, and retreatment rates between LDRT and HDRT groups were analyzed. RESULTS: Thirty-five patients with 70 treated lesions were included: 24 patients (48 lesions) treated with HDRT and 11 patients (22 lesions) with LDRT. Median follow-up was 14 and 16.89 months for HDRT and LDRT, respectively. The median dose of HDRT treatment was 20 Gy versus 4 Gy in the LDRT group. The CPR rate was 98% for HDRT and 95% for LDRT. There was no significant difference in any-grade acute toxicity between the HDRT and LDRT cohorts (24.5% vs 9.1%, Χ2 P = .20). Pain recurred in 10% of lesions (12% HDRT vs 9.5% LDRT). Median duration of pain response did not significantly differ between cohorts (P = .91). Five lesions were retreated, 2 (9.5%) in the LDRT cohort, and 3 (6.3%) in the HDRT cohort. CONCLUSION: In this study, LDRT effectively palliated painful, uncomplicated MM bony lesions with acceptable CPR and duration of palliation. These data support prospective comparisons of LDRT versus HDRT for palliation of painful, uncomplicated MM bony lesions.
Authors
Price, JG; Niedzwiecki, D; Oyekunle, T; Arcasoy, MO; Champ, CE; Kelsey, CR; Salama, JK; Moravan, MJ
MLA Citation
Price, Jeremy G., et al. “Effective Pain Control With Very Low Dose Palliative Radiation Therapy for Patients With Multiple Myeloma With Uncomplicated Osseous Lesions.Adv Radiat Oncol, vol. 6, no. 4, July 2021, p. 100729. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.adro.2021.100729.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1488947
PMID
34258474
Source
pubmed
Published In
Advances in Radiation Oncology
Volume
6
Published Date
Start Page
100729
DOI
10.1016/j.adro.2021.100729

Nomogram Predicting Overall Survival Benefit of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

OBJECTIVES: To develop and validate a nomogram that predicts overall survival (OS) for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) vs. observation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Adults with biopsy-proven T1-T2N0 NCSLC treated with SABR (30-70 Gy in 1-10 fractions with biologically effective dose ≥100 Gy10) or observation between 2004 and 2015 in the National Cancer Database (NCDB) were identified. Propensity score was used to match SABR and observation cohorts on prognostic demographic and clinicopathologic factors identified by logistic regression. Using backward selection, a multivariable Cox proportional hazard was identified predicting 2- and 5-year OS via a nomogram. Model prediction accuracy was assessed by time-dependent receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and integrated area under the ROC curve (AUC) analysis. RESULTS: A total of 22,073 adults met inclusion criteria and 4418 matched pairs (total n = 8836) were identified for nomogram development. The factors most strongly associated with improved OS on multivariable analysis included younger age (HR 0.82 by decade, P < .001), female sex (HR 0.81, P < .001), lower comorbidity index (HR 0.65 for 0 vs. ≥3, P < .001), smaller tumor size (HR 0.60 for ≤3 cm vs. 5.1-7 cm, P < .001), adenocarcinoma histology (P < .001), and receipt of SABR (P < .001). Interaction between SABR and histology was significantly associated with OS (P = .017). Relative to adenocarcinoma, patients with squamous cell carcinoma who were observed (HR 1.44, 95% CI 1.33-1.56) or treated with SABR (HR 1.24, 95% CI 1.14-1.35) had significantly worse OS. The nomogram demonstrated fair accuracy for predicting OS, with an integrated time-dependent AUC of 0.694 over the entire follow-up period. CONCLUSION: This nomogram estimates OS at 2 and 5 years based on whether medically inoperable early-stage NSCLC patients receive SABR or elect for observation. Incorporation of other variables not captured within the NCDB may improve the model accuracy.
Authors
Jacobs, CD; Mehta, K; Gao, J; Wang, X; Salama, JK; Kelsey, CR; Torok, JA
MLA Citation
Jacobs, Corbin D., et al. “Nomogram Predicting Overall Survival Benefit of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.Clin Lung Cancer, June 2021. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.cllc.2021.06.008.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1489730
PMID
34301453
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clin Lung Cancer
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.cllc.2021.06.008

Strike or Spare? A Review of Lung-Sparing Therapies for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma.

Authors
Kruser, TJ; Robinson, C; Owen, D; Salama, JK; Daly, ME
MLA Citation
Kruser, Tim J., et al. “Strike or Spare? A Review of Lung-Sparing Therapies for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma.International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, vol. 110, no. 2, June 2021, pp. 257–60. Epmc, doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2021.02.016.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1482190
PMID
33989566
Source
epmc
Published In
International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics
Volume
110
Published Date
Start Page
257
End Page
260
DOI
10.1016/j.ijrobp.2021.02.016