Joseph Salama

Overview:

Development of novel radiation treatment techniques for patients with limited metastatic disease, and integration of these treatments with systemic therapies. Treatment of head and neck cancers with chemotherapy, radiation and novel targeted drugs. Improving outcomes for medically inoperable patients with lung cancer with new radiation methods. Developing predictors for toxicity of patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation therapy for non-small cell and small cell lung cancer.

Positions:

Professor of Radiation Oncology

Radiation Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2001

Baylor College of Medicine

Transitional Year Resident, Radiation Oncology

University of Texas Medical School at Houston

Resident, Radiation Oncology

University of Chicago

Chief Resident, Radiation Oncology

University of Chicago

Grants:

Publications:

Development and Implementation of an Educational Simulation Workshop in Fiberoptic Laryngoscopy for Radiation Oncology Residents.

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: Fiberoptic laryngoscopy (FOL) is a critical tool for the diagnosis, staging, assessment of treatment response, and detection of recurrence for head and neck (H&N) malignancies. No standardized recommendations exist for procedural FOL education in radiation oncology. We therefore implemented a pilot simulation workshop to train radiation oncology residents in pertinent H&N anatomy and FOL technique. MATERIALS/METHODS: A two-phase workshop and simulation session was designed. Residents initially received a lecture on H&N anatomy and the logistics of the FOL exam. Subsequently, residents had a practical session in which they performed FOL in two simulated environments: a computerized FOL program and a mannequin-based practice. Site-specific attending physicians were present to provide real-time guidance and education. Pre- and post-workshop surveys were administered to the participants to determine the impact of the workshop. Subsequently, postgraduate year (PGY)-2 residents were required to complete six supervised FOL exams in clinic and were provided immediate feedback. RESULTS: Annual workshops were performed in 2017-2019. The survey completion rate was 14/18 (78%). Participants ranged from fourth year medical students (MS-4) to PGY2-PGY-5 residents. All PGY-2 residents completed their 6 supervised FOL exams. On a 5-point Likert scale, mean H&N anatomy knowledge increased from 2.4 to 3.7 (standard deviation=0.6, p<0.0001). Similarly, mean FOL procedural skill confidence increased from 2.2 to 3.3 (standard deviation=0.7, p<0.0001). These effects were limited to novice (MS4-PGY2) participants. 100% of participants found the exercise clinically informative. CONCLUSION: A simulation-based workshop for teaching FOL procedural skills increased confidence and procedural expertise of new radiation oncology residents and translated directly to supervised clinical encounters. Adoption of this type of program may help to improve resident training in H&N cancer.
Authors
Price, JG; Spiegel, DY; Yoo, DS; Moravan, MJ; Mowery, YM; Niedzwiecki, D; Brizel, DM; Salama, JK
MLA Citation
Price, Jeremy G., et al. “Development and Implementation of an Educational Simulation Workshop in Fiberoptic Laryngoscopy for Radiation Oncology Residents.Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys, May 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2020.05.009.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1441495
PMID
32417408
Source
pubmed
Published In
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.ijrobp.2020.05.009

DOES ABDOMINAL AND PELVIC ADIPOSE TISSUE DISTRIBUTION IMPACT PROSTATE CANCER-SPECIFIC OUTCOMES AFTER RADIATION THERAPY?

Authors
Di Bella, CM; Howard, LE; Oyekunle, T; De Hoedt, AM; Salama, JK; Freedland, SJ; Allott, EH
MLA Citation
Di Bella, Claire M., et al. “DOES ABDOMINAL AND PELVIC ADIPOSE TISSUE DISTRIBUTION IMPACT PROSTATE CANCER-SPECIFIC OUTCOMES AFTER RADIATION THERAPY?Journal of Urology, vol. 203, LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, 2020, pp. E784–E784.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1441808
Source
wos
Published In
The Journal of Urology
Volume
203
Published Date
Start Page
E784
End Page
E784

Survival Advantage With Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Veterans Health Administration Analysis.

BACKGROUND: Adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) after chemoradiation (CRT) and surgery for locoregionally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) is a standard of care in the United States. This study examined the role, optimal regimen, and duration of AC using data from the largest integrated health system in the United States. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Using the Veterans Affairs Central Cancer Registry, patients with stage II-III rectal cancer diagnosed in 2001 through 2011 who received neoadjuvant CRT and surgery with or without AC were identified. Kaplan-Meier analysis, log-rank tests, and propensity score (PS) adjustment analysis were used to assess survival. RESULTS: A total of 866 patients were identified; 417 received AC and 449 did not (observation [OBS] group). Median follow-up was 109 months. Median disease-specific survival (DSS) was not reached. Six-year DSS was 73.7%; 79.5% for the AC group versus 68.0% for the OBS group. PS-matched analysis for DSS favored AC (P=.0002). Median overall survival (OS) was 90.8 months. Six-year OS was 56.7%; 64.3% for AC versus 49.6% for OBS. In PS-matched analysis, median OS was 117.4 months for AC and 74.3 months for OBS (P<.0001). A DSS advantage was seen when comparing ≥4 months with <4 months of AC (P=.023). No difference in DSS or OS was seen with single-agent versus multiagent AC. CONCLUSIONS: In this population of patients with LARC treated with neoadjuvant CRT and surgery, OS and DSS were improved among those treated with AC versus OBS. DSS benefits were seen with ≥4 months of AC. No additional benefit was observed with multiagent therapy. In the absence of phase III data, these findings support the use of AC for LARC.
Authors
Spiegel, DY; Boyer, MJ; Hong, JC; Williams, CD; Kelley, MJ; Salama, JK; Palta, M
MLA Citation
Spiegel, Daphna Y., et al. “Survival Advantage With Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Veterans Health Administration Analysis.J Natl Compr Canc Netw, vol. 18, no. 1, Jan. 2020, pp. 52–58. Pubmed, doi:10.6004/jnccn.2019.7329.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1427151
PMID
31910388
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Natl Compr Canc Netw
Volume
18
Published Date
Start Page
52
End Page
58
DOI
10.6004/jnccn.2019.7329

Signals from SABR-COMET time to move on to phase III studies.

Authors
Milano, MT; Chowdhry, AK; Salama, JK; Chmura, SJ
MLA Citation
Milano, Michael T., et al. “Signals from SABR-COMET time to move on to phase III studies.Ann Transl Med, vol. 7, no. Suppl 8, Dec. 2019, p. S316. Pubmed, doi:10.21037/atm.2019.09.152.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1427286
PMID
32016034
Source
pubmed
Published In
Annals of Translational Medicine
Volume
7
Published Date
Start Page
S316
DOI
10.21037/atm.2019.09.152

Combining immunotherapy and radiotherapy for the STAR treatment.

Authors
Torok, JA; Salama, JK
MLA Citation
Torok, Jordan A., and Joseph K. Salama. “Combining immunotherapy and radiotherapy for the STAR treatment.Nat Rev Clin Oncol, vol. 16, no. 11, Nov. 2019, pp. 666–67. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41571-019-0277-2.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1412038
PMID
31541199
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nature Reviews. Clinical Oncology
Volume
16
Published Date
Start Page
666
End Page
667
DOI
10.1038/s41571-019-0277-2