Stefanie Sarantopoulos

Positions:

Associate Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
School of Medicine

Associate Professor of Immunology

Immunology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1998

Boston University

Ph.D. 1998

Boston University School of Medicine

Intern, Internal Medicine

Boston University School of Medicine

Resident, Internal Medicine

Boston University School of Medicine

Chief Resident, Internal Medicine

Boston University School of Medicine

Fellowship, Hematology/ Oncology

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Grants:

BAFF Pathology: Novel Therapeutic Targets in Chronic Graft versus Host Disease

Administered By
Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Breaking B-Cell Tolerance to Produce Antibodies that Eradicate Leukemias and Lymphomas

Administered By
Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
Awarded By
Department of Defense
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

The Notch2-BCR Axis: Targeting Drivers of B cell Fate in Chronic GVHD

Administered By
Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
Awarded By
Leukemia & Lymphoma Society
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Understanding Aberrant TLR7 Signaling in B Cells from Patients with Chronic GVHD

Administered By
Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
Awarded By
American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase II of Entospletinib, a SYK Inhibitor, First line cGVHD patients

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Gilead Sciences, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Phase I dose escalation study of naive T-cell depleted donor lymphocyte infusion following allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

Prophylactic donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI) are used to augment post-transplant immune recovery to reduce both infectious complications and disease recurrence. Preclinical studies implicate the naive T-cell subset as the primary driver of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). In this phase I dose escalation study, we assessed the safety of a DLI that was depleted of CD45RA+ naive T cells. Sixteen adult patients received a prophylactic DLI at a median of 113 days (range 76-280 days) following an HLA-identical, non-myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Three patients each received the naive T-cell depleted DLI with a CD3+ dose of 1 × 105/kg, 1 × 106/kg, and 5 × 106/kg. The maximum dose of 1 × 107/kg was expanded to 7 patients. No dose-limiting grade III/IV acute GvHD or adverse events attributable to the DLI were observed at any dose level. One patient developed grade 2 acute GvHD of skin and upper intestines, and another developed moderate chronic GvHD of the lungs following the DLI. With a median follow-up of 2.8 years, 2-year progression-free and overall survival is 50.0% and 68.8%, respectively. In conclusion, these data suggest that a DLI that has been depleted of CD45RA+ naive T cells is feasible and carries a low risk of acute or chronic GvHD.
Authors
Maung, KK; Chen, BJ; Barak, I; Li, Z; Rizzieri, DA; Gasparetto, C; Sullivan, KM; Long, GD; Engemann, AM; Waters-Pick, B; Nichols, KR; Lopez, R; Kang, Y; Sarantopoulos, S; Sung, AD; Chao, NJ; Horwitz, ME
MLA Citation
Maung, Ko K., et al. “Phase I dose escalation study of naive T-cell depleted donor lymphocyte infusion following allogeneic stem cell transplantation.Bone Marrow Transplant, July 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41409-020-0991-5.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1450672
PMID
32624583
Source
pubmed
Published In
Bone Marrow Transplant
Published Date
DOI
10.1038/s41409-020-0991-5

Allogeneic HSCT for autoimmune disease: a shared decision.

MLA Citation
Sullivan, Keith M., and Stefanie Sarantopoulos. “Allogeneic HSCT for autoimmune disease: a shared decision.Nat Rev Rheumatol, vol. 15, no. 12, Dec. 2019, pp. 701–02. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41584-019-0306-7.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1412070
PMID
31530942
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nat Rev Rheumatol
Volume
15
Published Date
Start Page
701
End Page
702
DOI
10.1038/s41584-019-0306-7

Delayed Reconstitution of Bone Marrow B Cell Precursors After Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation Is Associated With Chronic Graft Versus Host Disease (cGVHD)

Authors
Fedoriw, Y; Cichon, L; Dokouhaki, P; Mathews, S; Sharf, A; Sarantopoulos, S
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1064834
Source
wos
Published In
Modern Pathology : an Official Journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc
Volume
28
Published Date
Start Page
344A
End Page
344A

Bone marrow B cell precursor number after allogeneic stem cell transplantation and GVHD development.

Patients without chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) have robust B cell reconstitution and are able to maintain B cell homeostasis after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). To determine whether B lymphopoiesis differs before cGVHD develops, we examined bone marrow (BM) biopsies for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) and PAX5 immunostaining early post-HSCT at day 30 when all patients have been shown to have high B cell activating factor (BAFF) levels. We found significantly greater numbers of BM B cell precursors in patients who did not develop cGVHD compared with those who developed cGVHD (median = 44 vs 2 cells/high powered field [hpf]; respectively; P < .001). Importantly, a significant increase in precursor B cells was maintained when patients receiving high-dose steroid therapy were excluded (median = 49 vs 20 cells/hpf; P = .017). Thus, we demonstrate the association of BM B cell production capacity in human GVHD development. Increased BM precursor B cell number may serve to predict good clinical outcome after HSCT.
Authors
Fedoriw, Y; Samulski, TD; Deal, AM; Dunphy, CH; Sharf, A; Shea, TC; Serody, JS; Sarantopoulos, S
MLA Citation
Fedoriw, Yuri, et al. “Bone marrow B cell precursor number after allogeneic stem cell transplantation and GVHD development.Biol Blood Marrow Transplant, vol. 18, no. 6, June 2012, pp. 968–73. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.bbmt.2012.03.005.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1115018
PMID
22446015
Source
pubmed
Published In
Biol Blood Marrow Transplant
Volume
18
Published Date
Start Page
968
End Page
973
DOI
10.1016/j.bbmt.2012.03.005

Generation of a polyclonal Fab phage display library to the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum.

We had developed a technology for creation of recombinant polyclonal antibody libraries, standardized perpetual mixtures of polyclonal whole antibodies for which the genes are available and can be altered as desired. We report here the first phase of generating a polyclonal antibody library to Cryptosporidium parvum, a protozoan parasite that causes severe disease in AIDS patients, for which there is no effective treatment. BALB/c mice, immunized by neonatal oral infection with oocysts followed by intraperitoneal immunization with a sporozoite/oocyst preparation of C. parvum, were used for construction of a Fab phage display library in a specially-designed bidirectional vector. This library was selected for reactivity to an oocyst/sporozoite preparation, and was shown to be antigen-specific and diverse. Following mass transfer of the selected variable region gene pairs to appropriate mammalian expression vectors, such anti-C. parvum Fab phage display libraries could be used to develop chimeric polyclonal antibody libraries, with mouse variable regions and human constant regions, for passive immunotherapy of C. parvum infection.
Authors
Baecher-Allan, CM; Santora, K; Sarantopoulos, S; Den, W; Sompuram, SR; Sharon, J; Cevallos, AM; Bhat, N; Ward, H
MLA Citation
Baecher-Allan, C. M., et al. “Generation of a polyclonal Fab phage display library to the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum.Comb Chem High Throughput Screen, vol. 2, no. 6, Dec. 1999, pp. 319–25.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1115037
PMID
10644857
Source
pubmed
Published In
Combinatorial Chemistry & High Throughput Screening
Volume
2
Published Date
Start Page
319
End Page
325