Stefanie Sarantopoulos

Positions:

Associate Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
School of Medicine

Associate Professor of Immunology

Immunology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1998

Boston University

Ph.D. 1998

Boston University School of Medicine

Intern, Internal Medicine

Boston University School of Medicine

Resident, Internal Medicine

Boston University School of Medicine

Chief Resident, Internal Medicine

Boston University School of Medicine

Fellowship, Hematology/ Oncology

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Grants:

BAFF Pathology: Novel Therapeutic Targets in Chronic Graft versus Host Disease

Administered By
Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Breaking B-Cell Tolerance to Produce Antibodies that Eradicate Leukemias and Lymphomas

Administered By
Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
Awarded By
Department of Defense
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

The Notch2-BCR Axis: Targeting Drivers of B cell Fate in Chronic GVHD

Administered By
Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
Awarded By
Leukemia & Lymphoma Society
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Understanding Aberrant TLR7 Signaling in B Cells from Patients with Chronic GVHD

Administered By
Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
Awarded By
American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase II of Entospletinib, a SYK Inhibitor, First line cGVHD patients

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Gilead Sciences, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Phase I dose escalation study of naive T-cell depleted donor lymphocyte infusion following allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

Prophylactic donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI) are used to augment post-transplant immune recovery to reduce both infectious complications and disease recurrence. Preclinical studies implicate the naive T-cell subset as the primary driver of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). In this phase I dose escalation study, we assessed the safety of a DLI that was depleted of CD45RA+ naive T cells. Sixteen adult patients received a prophylactic DLI at a median of 113 days (range 76-280 days) following an HLA-identical, non-myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Three patients each received the naive T-cell depleted DLI with a CD3+ dose of 1 × 105/kg, 1 × 106/kg, and 5 × 106/kg. The maximum dose of 1 × 107/kg was expanded to 7 patients. No dose-limiting grade III/IV acute GvHD or adverse events attributable to the DLI were observed at any dose level. One patient developed grade 2 acute GvHD of skin and upper intestines, and another developed moderate chronic GvHD of the lungs following the DLI. With a median follow-up of 2.8 years, 2-year progression-free and overall survival is 50.0% and 68.8%, respectively. In conclusion, these data suggest that a DLI that has been depleted of CD45RA+ naive T cells is feasible and carries a low risk of acute or chronic GvHD.
Authors
Maung, KK; Chen, BJ; Barak, I; Li, Z; Rizzieri, DA; Gasparetto, C; Sullivan, KM; Long, GD; Engemann, AM; Waters-Pick, B; Nichols, KR; Lopez, R; Kang, Y; Sarantopoulos, S; Sung, AD; Chao, NJ; Horwitz, ME
MLA Citation
Maung, Ko K., et al. “Phase I dose escalation study of naive T-cell depleted donor lymphocyte infusion following allogeneic stem cell transplantation.Bone Marrow Transplant, July 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41409-020-0991-5.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1450672
PMID
32624583
Source
pubmed
Published In
Bone Marrow Transplant
Published Date
DOI
10.1038/s41409-020-0991-5

Allogeneic HSCT for autoimmune disease: a shared decision.

MLA Citation
Sullivan, Keith M., and Stefanie Sarantopoulos. “Allogeneic HSCT for autoimmune disease: a shared decision.Nat Rev Rheumatol, vol. 15, no. 12, Dec. 2019, pp. 701–02. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41584-019-0306-7.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1412070
PMID
31530942
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nat Rev Rheumatol
Volume
15
Published Date
Start Page
701
End Page
702
DOI
10.1038/s41584-019-0306-7

Employment, Insurance, and Financial Experiences of Patients with Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease in North America.

Understanding the socioeconomic impact of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) on affected patients is essential to help improve their overall well-being. Using data from the Chronic GVHD Consortium, we describe the insurance, employment, and financial challenges faced by these patients and the factors associated with the ability to work/attend school and associated financial burdens. A 15-item cross-sectional questionnaire designed to measure financial concerns, income, employment, and insurance was completed by 190 patients (response rate, 68%; 10 centers) enrolled on a multicenter Chronic GVHD Consortium Response Measures Validation Study. Multivariable logistic regression models examined the factors associated with financial burden and ability to work/attend school. The median age of respondents was 56years, and 87% of the patients were white. A higher proportion of nonrespondents had lower income before hematopoietic cell transplantation and less than a college degree. All but 1 patient had insurance, 34% had faced delayed/denied insurance coverage for chronic GVHD treatments, and 66% reported a financial burden. Patients with a financial burden had greater depression/anxiety and difficulty sleeping. Nonwhite race, lower mental functioning, and lower activity score were associated with a greater likelihood of financial burden. Younger age, early risk disease, and higher mental functioning were associated with a greater likelihood of being able to work/attend school. In this multicenter cohort of patients with chronic GVHD, significant negative effects on finances were observed even with health insurance coverage. Future research should investigate potential interventions to provide optimal and affordable care to at-risk patients and prevent long-term adverse financial outcomes in this vulnerable group.
Authors
Khera, N; Hamilton, BK; Pidala, JA; Wood, WA; Wu, V; Voutsinas, J; Onstad, L; Alousi, AM; Broady, R; Chen, GL; Arora, M; Cutler, C; Flowers, ME; Ganetsky, A; Jagasia, M; McCarthy, PL; Sarantopoulos, S; Abel, GA; Majhail, NS; Lee, SJ
MLA Citation
Khera, Nandita, et al. “Employment, Insurance, and Financial Experiences of Patients with Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease in North America.Biol Blood Marrow Transplant, vol. 25, no. 3, 2019, pp. 599–605. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.bbmt.2018.09.040.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1306711
PMID
30296479
Source
pubmed
Published In
Biol Blood Marrow Transplant
Volume
25
Published Date
Start Page
599
End Page
605
DOI
10.1016/j.bbmt.2018.09.040

National Institutes of Health Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Late Effects Initiative: The Immune Dysregulation and Pathobiology Working Group Report.

Immune reconstitution after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) beyond 1 year is not completely understood. Many transplant recipients who are free of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and not receiving any immunosuppression more than 1 year after transplantation seem to be able to mount appropriate immune responses to common pathogens and respond adequately to immunizations. However, 2 large registry studies over the last 2 decades seem to indicate that infection is a significant cause of late mortality in some patients, even in the absence of concomitant GVHD. Research on this topic is particularly challenging for several reasons. First, there are not enough long-term follow-up clinics able to measure even basic immune parameters late after HCT. Second, the correlation between laboratory measurements of immune function and infections is not well known. Third, accurate documentation of infectious episodes is notoriously difficult. Finally, it is unclear what measures can be implemented to improve the immune response in a clinically relevant way. A combination of long-term multicenter prospective studies that collect detailed infectious data and store samples as well as a national or multinational registry of clinically significant infections (eg, vaccine-preventable severe infections, opportunistic infections) could begin to address our knowledge gaps. Obtaining samples for laboratory evaluation of the immune system should be both calendar and eventdriven. Attention to detail and standardization of practices regarding prophylaxis, diagnosis, and definitions of infections would be of paramount importance to obtain clean reliable data. Laboratory studies should specifically address the neogenesis, maturation, and exhaustion of the adaptive immune system and, in particular, how these are influenced by persistent alloreactivity, inflammation, and viral infection. Ideally, some of these long-term prospective studies would collect information on long-term changes in the gut microbiome and their influence on immunity. Regarding enhancement of immune function, prospective measurement of the response to vaccines late after HCT in a variety of clinical settings should be undertaken to better understand the benefits as well as the limitations of immunizations. The role of intravenous immunoglobulin is still not well defined, and studies to address it should be encouraged.
Authors
Gea-Banacloche, J; Komanduri, KV; Carpenter, P; Paczesny, S; Sarantopoulos, S; Young, J-A; El Kassar, N; Le, RQ; Schultz, KR; Griffith, LM; Savani, BN; Wingard, JR
MLA Citation
Gea-Banacloche, Juan, et al. “National Institutes of Health Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Late Effects Initiative: The Immune Dysregulation and Pathobiology Working Group Report.Biol Blood Marrow Transplant, vol. 23, no. 6, June 2017, pp. 870–81. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.bbmt.2016.10.001.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1147488
PMID
27751936
Source
pubmed
Published In
Biol Blood Marrow Transplant
Volume
23
Published Date
Start Page
870
End Page
881
DOI
10.1016/j.bbmt.2016.10.001

Phase I/II Trial of Dose-Escalated Busulfan Delivered by Prolonged Continuous Infusion in Allogeneic Transplant Patients.

Intensive chemotherapy or chemotherapy plus irradiation and allogeneic stem cell transplantation can be curative for patients with hematologic diseases. Reduced-intensity transplants can also achieve cure and result in less treatment-related mortality but higher relapse rates. Thus, optimizing the conditioning regimens used in allogeneic transplantation remains an important goal. We conducted a phase I/II trial to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of a continuous infusion of busulfan over 90 hours in conjunction with fludarabine followed by allogeneic related or unrelated donor transplant. Fifty-four patients with advanced hematologic malignancies were enrolled on this study. The MTD was identified as a 24-hour area under the curve (AUC) of approximately 7095 μM/min, which represents a 43% increase over the standard total daily AUC dose of 4800 μM/min given by intermittent schedules. DLTs at doses over 8000 μM/min were identified by a desquamative skin rash and mucositis. No dose-related increase in hepatic, pulmonary, or other organ toxicities were seen, whereas efficacy appeared to be improved at higher dose levels. Continuous-infusion busulfan with intermittent fludarabine provides an alternative treatment strategy that is generally well tolerated and permits an increase in total busulfan dose with encouraging efficacy. (NCI study no. NCT00448357.).
Authors
Shea, TC; Walko, C; Chung, Y; Ivanova, A; Sheets, J; Rao, K; Gabriel, D; Comeau, T; Wood, W; Coghill, J; Armistead, P; Sarantopoulos, S; Serody, J
MLA Citation
Shea, Thomas C., et al. “Phase I/II Trial of Dose-Escalated Busulfan Delivered by Prolonged Continuous Infusion in Allogeneic Transplant Patients.Biol Blood Marrow Transplant, vol. 21, no. 12, Dec. 2015, pp. 2129–35. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.bbmt.2015.07.016.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1080738
PMID
26210442
Source
pubmed
Published In
Biol Blood Marrow Transplant
Volume
21
Published Date
Start Page
2129
End Page
2135
DOI
10.1016/j.bbmt.2015.07.016