Susan Schneider

Overview:

Dr. Schneider is Associate Professor and serves as faculty lead for the oncology specialty at the School of Nursing. She received her doctorate in nursing from Case Western Reserve University, her Master of Science degree from Texas Woman’s University, and her BSN from the University of Akron. Dr. Schneider has extensive experience in pediatric and adult oncology nursing. She holds certification as a clinical nurse specialist and as an advanced oncology certified nurse.

Prior to joining the faculty at Duke University, Dr. Schneider taught in the oncology program at Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing at Case Western Reserve University, and was a clinical nurse specialist at University Hospitals of Cleveland. She is professionally active in a number of nursing . She has chaired the American Cancer Society Peer Review Committee on Scholarships and Professorships in Oncology Nursing, served as a member of the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) national board of directors, and is Past President of ONS. She is a board member for the Biden Cancer Initiative.  Dr. Schneider has received both the Excellence in Cancer Nursing Research and Excellence in Cancer Nursing Education Awards from the Oncology Nursing Society and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing.

Dr. Schneider's research interests include management of symptom distress in cancer patients, the use of distraction interventions to enhance coping, and the use of tailored protocols to promote chemotherapy adherence.

* Cancer Care
* Symptom Management
* Distraction Interventions
* Virtual Reality

Positions:

Associate Professor Emerita in the School of Nursing

School of Nursing
School of Nursing

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.S. 1985

Texas Woman's University

Ph.D. 1998

Case Western Reserve University

Research Assistant, Cystic Fribrosis

University Hospitals of Cleveland

Staff Nurse, Comprehensive Cancer Center

Ohio State University

Oncology CNS, Oncology

University Hospitals of Cleveland

Grants:

Informal Caregiver Training in Cancer Symptom Management

Administered By
School of Nursing
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Graduate Scholarship in Cancer Nursing Practice - Hartman

Administered By
School of Nursing
Awarded By
American Cancer Society, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Graduate Scholarship in Cancer Nursing Practice - Stewart

Administered By
School of Nursing
Awarded By
American Cancer Society, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Graduate Scholarship in Cancer Nursing Practice - Watson

Administered By
School of Nursing
Awarded By
American Cancer Society, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Graduate Scholarship in Cancer Nursing Practice - Burbage

Administered By
School of Nursing
Awarded By
American Cancer Society, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Music Intervention: Nonpharmacologic Method to Reduce Pain and Anxiety in Adult Patients Undergoing Bone Marrow Procedures.

<h4>Background</h4>Bone marrow procedures cause anxiety and pain in adult patients with cancer. Music is a safe, inexpensive, noninvasive intervention that is easy to implement and is well received by patients and providers.<h4>Objectives</h4>The purpose of this quality improvement project was to develop, implement, evaluate, and sustain a music protocol during bone marrow biopsy and aspiration procedures for adult patients with hematologic malignancies. In addition, this project sought to decrease pain, anxiety, heart rate, and blood pressure in patients undergoing bone marrow procedures.<h4>Methods</h4>The project coordinator collected baseline data regarding toleration of bone marrow procedures and then implemented a music protocol during the procedures during a six-month intervention phase. Comparison variables included pain, anxiety, heart rate, blood pressure, and subjective impressions.<h4>Findings</h4>The music protocol resulted in improved patient anxiety, decreased procedure time, and decreased medication use during bone marrow procedures. All patients who used the music intervention indicated they would use it again.
Authors
Schandert, LC; Affronti, ML; Prince, MS; Schneider, SM
MLA Citation
Schandert, Laura C., et al. “Music Intervention: Nonpharmacologic Method to Reduce Pain and Anxiety in Adult Patients Undergoing Bone Marrow Procedures.Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, vol. 25, no. 3, June 2021, pp. 314–20. Epmc, doi:10.1188/21.cjon.314-320.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1482874
PMID
34019034
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
25
Published Date
Start Page
314
End Page
320
DOI
10.1188/21.cjon.314-320

Preoperative Carbohydrate Loading in Patients Undergoing Thoracic Surgery: A Quality-Improvement Project.

<h4>Purpose</h4>The purpose of this project was to implement carbohydrate loading in patients undergoing thoracic surgery in an effort to decrease postoperative pain, nausea, and length of stay as a part of an enhanced recovery after surgery protocol.<h4>Design</h4>This quality-improvement project used a preintervention and postintervention design.<h4>Methods</h4>Carbohydrate loading was given to 50 patients before undergoing thoracic surgery. Chart review was performed for 47 patients who received standard preoperative instructions in the preintervention group as historical control.<h4>Findings</h4>Patients who received carbohydrate loading had a decreased use of opioids in the first 4 hours after surgery (P = .028) and decreased use of antiemetic medication in the first 24 hours after surgery compared with the preintervention group (P = .066). Patients who were instructed to consume carbohydrate loading complied 87% of the time.<h4>Conclusions</h4>Carbohydrate loading can decrease postoperative nausea and pain in patients undergoing thoracic surgery.
Authors
Pachella, LA; Mehran, RJ; Curtin, K; Schneider, SM
MLA Citation
Pachella, Laura A., et al. “Preoperative Carbohydrate Loading in Patients Undergoing Thoracic Surgery: A Quality-Improvement Project.Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing : Official Journal of the American Society of Perianesthesia Nurses, vol. 34, no. 6, Dec. 2019, pp. 1250–56. Epmc, doi:10.1016/j.jopan.2019.05.007.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1425030
PMID
31445819
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing : Official Journal of the American Society of Perianesthesia Nurses
Volume
34
Published Date
Start Page
1250
End Page
1256
DOI
10.1016/j.jopan.2019.05.007

Larotrectinib: A Targeted Therapy for Solid Tumors.

<h4>Background</h4>Although neurotrophic tyrosine receptor kinase (NTRK) gene fusions are not common in most cancers, they are present in more than 90% of some rare tumors. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved larotrectinib for patients with NTRK gene fusion-positive cancers that meet certain criteria. With ongoing advancements in tumor sequencing, it is anticipated that cancer treatment will be determined by genetic variants rather than by cancer type in the future.<h4>Objectives</h4>This article provides an overview of larotrectinib, a targeted therapy.<h4>Methods</h4>This article reviews clinical trial results and highlights implications for oncology nurses caring for patients taking larotrectinib.<h4>Findings</h4>Larotrectinib is an effective treatment option for some patients with NTRK gene fusion-positive cancers. Oncology nurses are key to educating patients on dosing, administration, side effects, and precautions.
Authors
Mota-George, G; Schneider, SM
MLA Citation
Mota-George, Gabriela, and Susan M. Schneider. “Larotrectinib: A Targeted Therapy for Solid Tumors.Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, vol. 25, no. 2, Apr. 2021, pp. 181–87. Epmc, doi:10.1188/21.cjon.181-187.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1476534
PMID
33739345
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
25
Published Date
Start Page
181
End Page
187
DOI
10.1188/21.cjon.181-187

Low-Dose Computed Tomography: Effects of Oncology Nurse Navigation on Lung Cancer Screening.

<h4>Background</h4>Low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) lung cancer screening is an evidence-based and reimbursable strategy to decrease lung cancer and all-cause mortality in qualifying patients, but there remains low use and variation in providers' LDCT screening, ordering, and referring knowledge.<h4>Objectives</h4>The purpose of this quality improvement project was to examine the effects of oncology nurse navigation on assisting patients and ensuring optimal LDCT lung cancer screening.<h4>Methods</h4>Oncology nurse navigators conducted LDCT provider education and navigated 133 eligible patients to LDCT during a five-month intervention time period.<h4>Findings</h4>Provider education resulted in improved documented tobacco cessation discussions and increased LDCT screening ordering fidelity. Mean days from LDCT to provider notification and mean days from LDCT to patient notification improved significantly.
Authors
Watson, J; Broome, ME; Schneider, SM
MLA Citation
Watson, Joni, et al. “Low-Dose Computed Tomography: Effects of Oncology Nurse Navigation on Lung Cancer Screening.Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, vol. 24, no. 4, Aug. 2020, pp. 421–29. Epmc, doi:10.1188/20.cjon.421-429.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1452125
PMID
32678377
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
24
Published Date
Start Page
421
End Page
429
DOI
10.1188/20.cjon.421-429

Optimizing Advanced Care Planning in Hospitalized Patients With Advanced Cancers: A Quality Improvement Initiative.

<h4>Background</h4>Advance care planning (ACP) that generates an advanced directive (AD) can ensure patient autonomy at end of life. ACP is challenging for healthcare providers. Delaying patient ACP may lead to poor quality end-of-life care. Facilitation of early ACP by bedside RNs and social workers (SWs) may improve end-of-life care.<h4>Objective</h4>To determine whether improved ACP by RNs and SWs impacts care transition times for patients with advanced cancers.<h4>Methods</h4>A pre-/post-educational intervention designed to reinforce the roles of RNs and SWs in facilitating early ACP and timely documentation of an AD on an inpatient oncology unit.<h4>Results</h4>AD documentation increased by 12% between pre- and post-intervention period. There was a nonsignificant trend toward longer lengths of stay for patients transitioning care without an AD compared to those patients with and AD.<h4>Discussion</h4>Bedside RNs and SWs are in a key position to facilitate early ACP which can positively impact care quality at end of life. However, ACP is a collaborative team effort, best initiated early by the primary oncology providers.<h4>Conclusion</h4>Early ACP may improve quality end-of-life care.<h4>Implications for nursing</h4>Continuing education for RNs and SWs to enhance coordination with primary oncology teams to facilitate earlier ACP is recommended.
Authors
Jackson, GL; Padilla, BI; Schneider, SM; Kyte, JJ
MLA Citation
Jackson, Gloria L., et al. “Optimizing Advanced Care Planning in Hospitalized Patients With Advanced Cancers: A Quality Improvement Initiative.Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice, vol. 12, no. 2, Oct. 2019, pp. 239–45. Epmc, doi:10.1891/2380-9418.12.2.239.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1423355
PMID
32745036
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice
Volume
12
Published Date
Start Page
239
End Page
245
DOI
10.1891/2380-9418.12.2.239

Research Areas:

Nursing
Oncology